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  • #61
    Originally posted by tandfman
    But I think when you get to the "you can die in bed" argument, you're really getting a little silly.
    True. I just don't think that everyone fully understands that doing what LOOKED dangerous to us, was second nature to him. He knew the risks of everything he did (including 'playing' with rays) and felt that the benefit to others (and animal conservation) was worth it. I just don't get people who think his death was irresponsible or avoidable (in the ordinary sense) or foolhardy. His death was no more 'avoidable' than me crossing a busy intersection. This IS a real risk, but I do it to 'get to the other side'. That's all the Croc Hunter was doing.

    (this is, however, infinitely more tragic than any dope bust in track T&F, regardless of which test comes up neg or pos)

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    • #62
      Originally posted by tafnut
      Originally posted by SQUACKEE
      For me, who loves sick humour, its a little early for jokes. But its a free country so knock yourself out.
      The irony is, of course, that Steve himself probably would have laughed at this joke at his expense.
      There was this South African climber named Dave Cheesmond, did a huge number of difficult first ascents in the Canadian Rockies in the 1980s, climbs that have seen few or no repeats. Killed with his partner on the Hummingbird Ridge on Mt. Logan (Canada) in 1987, presumably in a cornice collapse. A friend later named a new climb "Creamed Cheese." Cheesmond reportedly would have approved.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by tandfman
        I understand that and I think I made it clear, early in this thread, that I did not think he was wrong doing what he was doing. But I think when you get to the "you can die in bed" argument, you're really getting a little silly.
        I did not think it was silly mentioning about death in a bed. I just listed a range of things that I considered, being risks.

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        • #64
          Man, some people here get carried away. The point is that the locations and activities people generally feel safe in are the most dangerous (as far as linkage to death and injury) - sleeping, bathroom activities, driving. People are complacent about risks they are exposed to constantly and frightened about trivial risks they are unfamiliar with. I didn't like the Irwin persona but he knew what he was doing and the risks he faced from crocodiles etc, were less than everyday activities millions engage in without a second thought. If you want to make a lot of money like Irwin, then start a business based on asymmetrical understanding of risks, it is the path to wealth.

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          • #65
            I drive down the same twisty stretch of 2 lane road everyday to work and back. Last year a retired couple on their way to the airport for a vacation was driving on that very road when a massive dump truck cross over into their lane and killed both of them.
            phsstt!

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            • #66
              Originally posted by El Toro
              Man, some people here get carried away. The point is that the locations and activities people generally feel safe in are the most dangerous (as far as linkage to death and injury) - sleeping, bathroom activities, driving. People are complacent about risks they are exposed to constantly and frightened about trivial risks they are unfamiliar with. I didn't like the Irwin persona but he knew what he was doing and the risks he faced from crocodiles etc, were less than everyday activities millions engage in without a second thought. If you want to make a lot of money like Irwin, then start a business based on asymmetrical understanding of risks, it is the path to wealth.
              spoken like a man either born into oodles of money or one not caring that he has none.
              ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by tafnut
                True. I just don't think that everyone fully understands that doing what LOOKED dangerous to us, was second nature to him. He knew the risks of everything he did (including 'playing' with rays) and felt that the benefit to others (and animal conservation) was worth it. I just don't get people who think his death was irresponsible or avoidable (in the ordinary sense) or foolhardy. His death was no more 'avoidable' than me crossing a busy intersection. This IS a real risk, but I do it to 'get to the other side'. That's all the Croc Hunter was doing.

                Whenever something shocking and sad happens many of us analytic types immediately try to unwravel the tragedy and in our minds and hearts find a way to undo what has been done by believing it could have been avoided or seeing the scenario in a way that supports our comfortable beliefts about the way such things should be. I know that was my first reaction to the grief. There is alot that can be said about the program and the risks that were taken on camera.

                Irwin lived a short life and died a tragic death, but in his few years with us he accomplished much more than many of us ever do. He was truely, genuinely passionate about wildlife and the mystery and beauty of the animal kingdom. He spread that passion to many many others. He lived a full and meaningful life and has inspired millions to do the same. I dont think it is an exageration to say that for a troubled teenager fliping through the stations, some of the best character development could be gained simply be watching the shinning positive hopeful face of Irwin. Dont underestimate the power of a good life. Very few people who live 80 years can ever say that. He was a lovable, intrinsically kind and generous soul. That much came across vividly on the screen and made any person even moderately interested in wildlife and some Im sure that weren't want to be with him.
                ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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                • #68
                  You may have seen this touching cartoon in your paper. It shows a cartoon of a very sad sting ray and the caption reads,

                  " Im sorry steve, i didnt know it was you."
                  phsstt!

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