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Classical music: The Three Bs

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  • Classical music: The Three Bs

    I heard Maestro Bob Bernhardt of the Chattanooga Symphony give a talk today. He spoke of the Three Bs.

    Can anybody name them? This is a good trivia! No Googling.

  • #2
    Georges Bizet, Benjamin Britten, and Mili Balakirev? :-)

    Comment


    • #3
      3 Bs

      Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. Always have been, always will be. Will "B".

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 3 Bs

        Originally posted by dr ngo
        Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. Always have been, always will be. Will "B".
        One must be Johnny "B" Goode, no? :-)

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        • #5
          Re: 3 Bs

          Originally posted by dr ngo
          Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. Always have been, always will be. Will "B".
          Correct, Doc! Bernhardt said that Brahms was so intimidated by Beethoven, he waited many years to come out with his first symphony (or something to that effect). However, Brahms knew he had it the whole time.

          What an interesting talk about classical music. He brought a boom box with some CDs to help illustrate what he was saying. He played a piece written by Mozart at age 19. And it was either Mozart or Brahms who wrote first piece at age 8. With several instruments and lines of music.

          http://www.chattanoogasymphony.org/

          That is a link on our symphony.

          Bernhardt is also a fan of the Beatles. He played more obscure songs, "My Bird Can Sing (?)," that had two guitars playing in harmony. He said, "The Allmans did this later, but the Beatles did it first." I guess it is stuff like this why the Beatles are considered by experts to be the best ever.

          Ben, you'll appreciate this, speaking of the Beatles. They were talking about various celebs from Atlanta and Nashville who enjoy coming to Chattanooga and really like the city. The Civitan president said that Ringo Starr, who lives in Nashville, is in town all the time and particularly enjoys eating at The Blue Plate, which serves comfort food in a sophisticated setting. That really impressed me, but I'm not surprised. They said that Ringo loves Chattanooga.

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          • #6
            Would have been great to be inTennesee, sounds like a wonderful evening.
            ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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            • #7
              Music

              paul, I heard him speak to the Civitan Club. I wish I had been able to make the performance. They are also playing tonight at 8.

              http://www.chattanoogasymphony.org/inde ... recNbr=142

              Wanted to add this. Bernhardt mentioned the above violinist, who is one of the best in the world. Guest of the Chattanooga Symphony.

              This is the interesting part to me. Bernhardt said he heard him playing and instantly recognized his violin. "What a violin, what a sound, etc...," Bernhardt said. "How old is that violin?"

              "I got it in January."

              "Yes, but how old is it?"

              "January." (Laughter from the crowd.)

              There is a violin company in Germany that makes incredible violins. I don't know the name, but this was interesting to me.

              This makes me want to see the symphony play and learn about this music.

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              • #8
                it seems that in the last 10 years or more the understanding of what had made the great violins great has been unwraveled to a large extent. ..it is now more science than art.
                ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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                • #9
                  There's only one "B". Beethoven was God (or if you prefer, part of the triune God along witth Isaac Newton and Mark Twain).

                  Those other guys just don't belong even being mentioned in the same breath. Good as their stuff was, they were "B" leaguers by comparison.

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                  • #10
                    B-sharp, B-flat, and B????

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                    • #11
                      Brahms is probably a little over-rated in that company. His four symphonies are adequate and melodic but certainly neither innovative nor very original; his "Deutsches Requiem" on the other hand is a superb piece of music, his best composition by far, but it's the only Brahms composition which deserves to rank right up there with the world's best.

                      With Bach, on the other hand, we really are lucky to have anything by him; his work was largely forgotten until Mendelsohn "recovered" his music in the 19th century - and what a wealth of it there is.

                      Mahler, anyone? Or, for that matter, Sibelius, whose music seems to be enjoying a resurgence?

                      Mozart? Don't get me started.......

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                      • #12
                        Deity

                        Bach is God.

                        Mozart is his Only Begotten Son.

                        Beethoven is over-rated, and could not, for the life of him, figure out how to finish a piece. I'd like someone to run a stopwatch on the time from when he starts his first "closing" cadence until he actually runs out of steam (or the orchestra just gives up and goes home). Important in the history of music, yes. Divine? Hell, no.

                        If you'll allow operatic composers in as well - and why not? - Verdi and Puccini are Archangels at least.

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                        • #13
                          A Beethoven enthusiast passes.

                          http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/17/arts/ ... ref=slogin

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                          • #14
                            Re: Deity

                            Originally posted by dr ngo
                            Bach is God.

                            Mozart is his Only Begotten Son.

                            Beethoven is over-rated . . .
                            I'll heartily endorse the first part of that. The second is a stretch but I wouldn't quibble with it. The third is absurd. Beethoven was a great composer by any standards.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Deity

                              Originally posted by dr ngo
                              If you'll allow operatic composers in as well - and why not? - Verdi and Puccini are Archangels at least.

                              Wagner completes the triumvirate. Mozart was an outstanding, if underappreciated, operatic composer as well, with Cosi Fan Tutte, Marriage of Figaro, and The Magic Flute chief among his works.
                              There are no strings on me

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