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  • Originally posted by DrJay View Post
    Did you play in that game??
    Pretty funny, Jay. I remember the day I had my first beer, too.

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    • John L. Spivak
      Secret Armies: The New Technique of Nazi Warfare
      Modern Age Books
      1939

      Controversial, contemporary investigative reporting on Fifth Column activity in Europe and the Americas by Axis agents and local sympathizers. The Russians—and their sympathizers—are up to similar shenanigans in the Ukraine—and elsewhere—these days. Also given away by the aforementioned former colleague, it is available online.

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      • Did Doris Duke kill her interior designer in a fit of temper? I read this because I thought I may recognize a few names in the content. I didn't except for an undertaker. Anyway the tobacco/power/other heiress got away with things in '66 Newport (she also lived in NJ/HI) at the "Rough Point" estate. The fellow died by being rammed against a front iron gate with a station wagon.
        Last edited by Adam$; 01-31-2022, 07:01 PM.

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        • John Steinbeck
          The Grapes of Wrath
          Bantam Books
          1972

          Somehow I stumbled through both high school and college without reading this masterpiece. The copy I just consumed—or by which I was just consumed—bears ink stamps from my alma mater high school on the inside front cover, and at the bottom of Page 100. I'll be on the lookout for Lt. Joe Bookman:



          I've added Whose Names Are Unknown to my reading list.

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          • I just read Around The World In 80 Days by Jules Verne to see if the current Masterpiece Series on PBS follows the book. The short answer is that other than the route, the series has little resemblance to the book. Characters and incidents do not match. Even Phineas Fogg is vastly different.

            The book is easy reading since it was originally written as a newspaper serial. There are 175 pages divided into 37 chapters - less than 5 pages per chapter.

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            • Arthur Koestler
              Darkness at Noon
              Translated by Daphne Hardy
              Signet Books
              Published by The New American Library of World Literature
              Twelfth printing
              September 1960

              Hype from the back cover:

              Brainwashed!

              One of the memorable novels of modern times, this is the story of a strong and dedicated man who was destroyed by the dictator state he had helped to create.

              Moving and dramatic, Darkness at Noon gives a potent and intimate picture of totalitarian terrorism—and of a man of dignity and integrity who finally succumbed to fiendish psychological torture, betrayed the woman that he loved, and confessed to crimes he never committed.

              A widely acclaimed work of fiction, Darkness at Noon became an outstanding Broadway hit, won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for the Best American Play of the season, and recently received nationwide praise when it was given a brilliant production on television.
              Also given away by the aforementioned former colleague, an earlier printing is available online.

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              • Rob Roy by Sir Walter Scott. I thought I would read it, then watch the movie. Turns out the movie is no relation to the classic novel.

                Totally engrossing, but be prepared to wrangle with reading Scottish words that bear a passing resemblance to their English counterparts. 10/10.

                Some time back I started reading from the Classics shelf in my local library, which is sorted by author. I started in the Zs and am working backward.

                Really enjoyed The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington. I was born near Cincinnati, OH in the '50s and feel like I touched a little bit of family history in reading these books.

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                • About halfway thru "Apollo's Arrow" by Nicholas Christakis, which is about the pandemic. I've kinda gotten into reading about the pandemic so I can try to understand it better. This is very good.

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                  • 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoyevsky. Recommended to me as beneficial for Lent. (I may finish it by Pentecost - it's not what one would call a "quick read"!)

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                    • Originally posted by cigar95 View Post
                      'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoyevsky. Recommended to me as beneficial for Lent. (I may finish it by Pentecost - it's not what one would call a "quick read"!)
                      Good for you! Even as a 30-year lit instructor, I can't slog through tomes like that . . . or War and Peace . . . or Moby Dick. Give me Dan Brownian 3-page chapters, with a cliff-hanger ending in each one!

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                      • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                        Good for you! Even as a 30-year lit instructor, I can't slog through tomes like that . . . or War and Peace . . . or Moby Dick. Give me Dan Brownian 3-page chapters, with a cliff-hanger ending in each one!
                        For some reason, about two decades ago I forced myself to make it through The Brothers K but wasn't happy about it. As for W&P, I've attempted that about a half-dozen times without making it out of the opening party scene. One time I bypassed that section, going straight to the military stuff - that didn't work either. Never tried MD but enjoyed the John Huston/Ray Bradbury/Gregory Peck movie as a kid.

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                        • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                          Good for you! Even as a 30-year lit instructor, I can't slog through tomes like that . . . or War and Peace . . . or Moby Dick. Give me Dan Brownian 3-page chapters, with a cliff-hanger ending in each one!
                          On the other hand, put 'Les Miserables' in my hands and I'll probably finish it in about ten days. (Although there's one section I have skipped every time I've read it.)

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                          • Originally posted by cigar95 View Post
                            (Although there's one section I have skipped every time I've read it.)
                            I have always thought Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the Great American Novel (first serious examination of racism in America), but the Mississippi River Folklore sections can easily be skipped over. Same with The Great Gatsby and all the party scenes.

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                            • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                              I have always thought Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the Great American Novel (first serious examination of racism in America), but the Mississippi River Folklore sections can easily be skipped over. Same with The Great Gatsby and all the party scenes.
                              If you've read any Hugo you know he enjoys going off on tangents. So I skip his discussion of Napoleon at Waterloo, with the exception of the last few pages that connect it to the rest of the story. But somehow I'm fascinated by his discourse on the Paris sewers. Go figure.

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                              • Starting Ivanhoe.

                                And finished. From someone with zero literary bona fides, I couldn't put it down. Literary art, just beautiful.
                                Last edited by Steele; 03-14-2022, 05:11 AM.

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