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What are some of your favorite oxymorons?

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  • proofs in the pudd'in
    replied
    How about :

    OXYMORON

    Leave a comment:


  • Novitiate
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by Mennisco

    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier mache pommes de terror des arbres.
    terrified apples?

    No, terrified apple TREES, sweetie!
    Must be canadian french (or my french is woeful, don't ask!). But wouldn't they use plaster of paris, not paper?
    Plaster of Montreal?

    Leave a comment:


  • Novitiate
    replied
    Civil War.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mennisco
    replied
    [quote=Daisy]
    Originally posted by Mennisco
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by Mennisco
    Originally posted by mike renfro
    Originally posted by "piaba":2txel10a
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.
    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier mache pommes de terror des arbres.
    terrified apples?
    No, terrified apple TREES, sweetie!
    Must be canadian french![/quote:2txel10a]

    They ram it down our throats in school, some takes and the rest goes to ecology!

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by Mennisco
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by Mennisco
    Originally posted by mike renfro
    Originally posted by piaba
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.
    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier mache pommes de terror des arbres.
    terrified apples?
    No, terrified apple TREES, sweetie!
    Must be canadian french (or my french is woeful, don't ask!). But wouldn't they use plaster of paris, not paper?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mennisco
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by Mennisco
    Originally posted by mike renfro
    Originally posted by piaba
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.
    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier mache pommes de terror des arbres.
    terrified apples?
    No, terrified apple TREES, sweetie!

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by mike renfro
    Originally posted by piaba
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.
    You have to understand we prefer what you call bland and over cooked. There is an art to that style of cooking that is clearly lost on the rest of the world.

    Originally posted by Mennisco

    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier mache pommes de terror des arbres.
    terrified apples?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mennisco
    replied
    Originally posted by mike renfro
    Originally posted by piaba
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.
    Yes, the British with their DRY sense of humour - that was obviously a pre-packaged bunch of paper MASHÈ potatoes - known in France as the dreaded papier-mâché pommes de terror des arbres.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    I've seen a version of that book, with the cover title "What I Really Undertand About Women" :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • mike renfro
    replied
    Originally posted by piaba
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...
    Not true anymore, but in the not that distant past, twas so. I once saw a book in a bookstore "Best of British Cooking". It contained blank pages.

    Leave a comment:


  • piaba
    replied
    i hear "british cuisine" used to be one...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mennisco
    replied
    Originally posted by tafnut
    Originally posted by piaba
    ever heard of "american culture" (or "australian", or "canadian")?

    how about "german humor"?
    You need to get out more. None of those are oxymoronic. Even in a tongue-in-cheek sense.
    Maybe dj stands for disc jockey: disc Jockeys? disc Calvins? disc undies?

    Leave a comment:


  • tafnut
    replied
    Originally posted by piaba
    ever heard of "american culture" (or "australian", or "canadian")?

    how about "german humor"?
    You need to get out more. None of those are oxymoronic. Even in a tongue-in-cheek sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • piaba
    replied
    ever heard of "american culture" (or "australian", or "canadian")?

    how about "german humor"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mennisco
    replied
    Originally posted by kuha
    "You're a WANG-ker, Mennisco"

    But, ya gotta admit that this is a brilliant pun!
    If ever a brill-ee-ant pun there wuz
    The weasel of puns was one because
    Because because becuz becuz becuz.......
    Because of the foxy punz she duz...

    brilliant pun = through to the finals for oxymoron of the year!

    Ya got me there Kuha! Hoo-ha!

    Leave a comment:

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