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Andre The Giant (read w/ many grains of salt)

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  • #16
    Re: Andre The Giant (read w/ many grains of salt)

    Originally posted by gh
    http://worldofbeer.com/brightbeer/canbeermyth.html
    "The standard strength of most major brewery beers -- 5% by volume in Canada; 4% by weight in the United States -- are actually more-or-less equal."

    Don't we deal in precise measurements on this website? Is it or isn't it? My marathon time is more or less equal to the WR.

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    • #17
      That makes the assumption that beer (of any stripe) (including red--pun intended) is made to decimal-like precision. It's not.

      And as the quote says, "more or less," which means that some Canadians are stronger, some are equal, some are less.... but on average, they're the same thing.

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      • #18
        Ok, but they have given an example comparing 5% by volume to 4% by weight. I assume that if we knew the density of alcohol, you would be able to say definitely:

        "Beer, 5% by volume in Canada, 4% by weight in the United States, is "x percent stronger(weaker) in Canada."

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        • #19
          You're looking for a level of accuracy that isn't there. Even within any given batch of brew from the same company. It's not an industry that works with tight standards; it's a biological process dependent upon a myriad of variables.

          Related: by California law, for example, a wine needs to be within 0.5% of what's on the label. So if you buy a Zin that's 16.2% (yeah, baby!), the actual alcohol in the bottle is between 15.7 and 16.7.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by gh
            You're looking for a level of accuracy that isn't there. Even within any given batch of brew from the same company. It's not an industry that works with tight standards; it's a biological process dependent upon a myriad of variables.

            Related: by California law, for example, a wine needs to be within 0.5% of what's on the label. So if you buy a Zin that's 16.2% (yeah, baby!), the actual alcohol in the bottle is between 15.7 and 16.7.
            The reason for this is that the number of degrees on the bottle of beer do not represent an alcohol, but a sugar content. As the fermentation process continues (dependending on many variables, such as temperature, type of container etc.), even the same batch has variable alcohol content.
            "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
            by Thomas Henry Huxley

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            • #21
              I believe all the mass-produced North American beer is pasteurized, so there's no change in alcohol once the "batch" is done.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by gh
                I believe all the mass-produced North American beer is pasteurized, so there's no change in alcohol once the "batch" is done.
                Good point, but some fermentation occurs even without any bacteria present, so I don't think pasteurization will completely stop the process of changing sugar to alcohol.
                "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                • #23
                  Fermentation, of course, doesn't use bacteria, but the fungus (yeast) Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. I was meaning pasteurization would kill it, but in googling, I discover that's not true. Common source of spoilage in pasteurized orange juice, apparently.

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                  • #24
                    I am not sure I remember my biochemistry that well, but isn't there a cellular process where under less than aerobic conditions glucose is metabolised to alcohol without any outside help (bacteria, yeast)?
                    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                    by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                    • #25
                      Hey, when I was taking biochem there were only 27 elements :-)

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by gh
                        Hey, when I was taking biochem there were only 27 elements :-)
                        Young whelp. We just had earth, wind, fire and water when I was a kid. Uphill both ways :shock:

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                        • #27
                          The Sports Illustrated reference to his capacity (this written by Terry Todd in an '81 edition):

                          <<....This lesson learned, I spent the remainder of my time drinking *with* Andre, not against him, and I can report with confidence that his capacity for alcohol is extraordinary.

                          During the week or so I was with him, his average daily consumption was a case or so of beer; a total of two bottles of wine, generally French, with his meals; six or eight shots of brandy, usually Courvoisier or Napoléon, though sometimes Calvados; half a dozen standard mixed drinks, such as Bloody Marys or Screwdrivers; and the odd glass of Pernod.

                          He drinks as many Frenchman drink - throughout the day - and he takes genuine comfort in his drinking, seemingly in agreement with the line from Housman that "Malt does more than Milton can / To justify God's ways to man."

                          But during the time I was with Andre, never once did I see him give any indication that the alcohol was affecting him. Several friends who have known him over the years say that on the rare occasion when he feels the need to tie one on he avoids beer or wine and goes quickly through three fifths of vodka.....>>

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