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Blame it all on the Be-in

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  • Blame it all on the Be-in

    This about sums it up:

    ""Over the years, probably a dozen people have come up to me and said "You guys were fantastic!' I say, "We weren't there,' " said David Getz, drummer for Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Janis Joplin-fronted band that was not on the lineup the day of the Be-In. "And they say, "No, I saw you!' Maybe they did.""


    http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20 ... 046439.asp

  • #2
    Having been 'up close and personal' to this era, it has always intrigued me 'how' it all started (hippies, drugs, 'Love & Peace', etc.). Certainly this was a watershed event

    In many ways, the psychedelic '60s were born Jan. 14, 1967, when musicians, poets, visionaries, student radicals and wayward youth gathered in Golden Gate Park. It was the unofficial birth of the counterculture movement that defined San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district, a prelude to the social and political upheaval that followed.
    but without the Beat Generation of the 50s, and the single most seminal event of the entire era, the Beatles' eruption onto the scene, it could not have been.

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    • #3
      It all started with Elvis; under-rated as a key force in the rebuilding of society.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by gh
        It all started with Elvis; under-rated as a key force in the rebuilding of society.
        certainly broke the levees of Black Music into the backwaters of White America, but even with his pelvic thrusts, he was an all-American kid. The Beatles with their long hair and rapidly evolving musical tastes/cultural consciousness-raising elements, broke of the back of America's love of conformity.

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        • #5
          no Elvis, no Beatles

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gh
            no Elvis, no Beatles
            And somehow, a large province of music has devolved into the most mindless, repetitive, cockroach-IQ [c]rap.

            hum-a hum-a ding dong
            singin' me a sing-song
            booty so dee-licious
            gonna grant ur wishes

            HELP :lol:
            Take good care of yourself.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gh
              no Elvis, no Beatles
              That's a continuum that extends FAR FAR beyond Elvis. I'm looking for the most paradigm-shifting event, and I'll say Beatles beat Elvis by one Frank Sinatra (oh Fraaaaaaankie!).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tafnut
                Originally posted by gh
                no Elvis, no Beatles
                That's a continuum that extends FAR FAR beyond Elvis. I'm looking for the most paradigm-shifting event, and I'll say Beatles beat Elvis by one Frank Sinatra (oh Fraaaaaaankie!).
                no Elvis, no Beatles; it's as simple as that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gh
                  no Elvis, no Beatles
                  But most of their covers were of Chucky Berry. Stones did that too.

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                  • #10
                    You're both wrong(well, gh is half right). It all started with Robert Johnson. Draw a direct line from him to Sam Phillips who figured Elvis could bring the blues to the white masses. Then, of course, there is that deal that Johnson made...

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