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  • At What Point . . .

    do you kick OJ out of the Pro Football Hall of Fame? Article in USAT asks that.

    OJ is not a convicted murderer, but he was found 'responsible' for his ex-wife's death, and that's why he owes the Goldmans $33 million. Now what if he is convicted of a felony armed theft charge? At what point is he an embarrassment to the sport?

    Or . . . do his on-field exploits keep him in there forever? Certainly there are crimes heinous enough to get him kicked out. Where should they draw the line?

  • #2
    I'd keep Hitler in a sports HOF. What happens elsewhere should count for zip.

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    • #3
      That kills that thread!

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      • #4
        :twisted: (should I have used Stalin or Pol Pot instead?)

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        • #5
          I cannot stand OJ, he makes me sick, but I agree with GH.

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          • #6
            The only reason I can think of to keep OJ in the HoF is the notion that he went completely insane AFTER his playing days were over, and the guy in the HoF is just a different guy from the psycho.

            If a serial rapist-killer had happened to be the 3-time Super Bowl MVP while he was piling up bodies in his basement, I'm pretty sure no one would want him in the Hall of Fame.

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            • #7
              A HOF is there to celebrate the performance of the athlete over a period of time. Whatever they do after that should not result in their removal from the Hall. They guy was a fabulous athlete....a rotten former athlete, however. Keep him in and just try to ignore him outside of that context.

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              • #8
                Of course this discussion kind of ignores the fact that OJ has never been found criminally guilty of a major crime . . . :P

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bad hammy
                  Of course this discussion kind of ignores the fact that OJ has never been found criminally guilty of a major crime . . . :P
                  refer to Post #1 - he IS responsible for his ex-wife's death.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tafnut
                    Originally posted by bad hammy
                    Of course this discussion kind of ignores the fact that OJ has never been found criminally guilty of a major crime . . . :P
                    refer to Post #1 - he IS responsible for his ex-wife's death.
                    Never convicted of a major crime . . .

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                    • #11
                      Is Bob Hayes in the HoF ??? I seem to remember him being kept out because of the problems he had. I think they happened after he had retired or was it towards the end of career ???

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by trackworld
                        Is Bob Hayes in the HoF ??? I seem to remember him being kept out because of the problems he had. I think they happened after he had retired or was it towards the end of career ???
                        Barnes & Noble yesterday at lunch browsing and came across a new book by Sal Paolantonio, that ESPN guy on the Most Overrated and Underrated Moments/Games/etc. in Sports. For Most Underrated Moments, his #2 moment was when the Dallas Cowboys drafted Bob Hayes. He argues, and I think correctly, that Hayes (besides being the fastest man of all time, IMHO) completely changed the game of pro football. Pass defenses had to change completely to deal with his game-changing speed. Prior to Hayes, everybody played simple man-to-man but that was impossible with Hayes. Paolantonio also notes, and I agree, that Hayes definitely belongs in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

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                        • #13
                          [quote=bad hammy]
                          Originally posted by tafnut
                          Originally posted by "bad hammy":dpxny5f0
                          Of course this discussion kind of ignores the fact that OJ has never been found criminally guilty of a major crime . . . :P
                          refer to Post #1 - he IS responsible for his ex-wife's death.
                          Never convicted of a major crime . . .[/quote:dpxny5f0]
                          So what? All that means is that the jury in the criminal case found that there was some element of reasonable doubt, perhaps a small one, that he was guilty. But the fact remains that a civil jury, presumably weighing the same evidence, in a case in which OJ was represented by competent counsel, found that the preponderance of the evidence led to the conclusion that he killed her. In other words, they found it more likely than not that he WAS responsible for her death, as tafnut points out.

                          This means, among other things, that tafnut and others can say he killed her without risking a defamation action. It also means that he and others can post that statement on this Board and the mods won't pull it on the grounds that it is an unsupported accusation. And it seems relevant to the consideration of his HOF status if you believe that non-sports deeds and mis-deeds should be relevant, which I, for one, don't.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Law dude
                            if you believe that non-sports deeds and mis-deeds should be relevant, which I, for one, don't.
                            so just so I have this straight, if we have my scenario from above:

                            A serial rapist-killer is the 3-time Super Bowl MVP while he is piling up bodies in his basement, . . . . he gets to stay in the HoF after he's convicted of the 40 rape-murders?

                            How do you reconcile that with the feelings and needs of the victims' families and society in general?

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