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Alltime chokes in sports bureaucracy history

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  • #16
    And how would that fly with the American public tandfman, seizing passports or locking Americans out of the US? I suspect if the USOC's House of Delegates had shown some backbone and stood up to the Carter administration that would have been the end of it as far as the athletes were concerned. Carter was already in deep s**t after the failed hostage rescue. They couldn't afford another PR disaster like a battle over innocent athletes would have been. They would have folded. BUT.......

    The USOC would have likely had its tax-exempt status revoked, and that threat was the REAL deal-sealer. But as I mentioned earlier, it wouldn't have lasted into the next fiscal year anyway once Reagan was in office, and anyone with half a brain could see Carter wasn't going to be re-elected.

    What a bunch of spineless jellyfish.
    There are no strings on me

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    • #17
      Originally posted by guru
      The USOC would have likely had its tax-exempt status revoked, and that threat was the REAL deal-sealer.
      As I recall, the thing that was really scaring them was the prospect that their sponsors might be given a choice--if you want to continue doing busines with the US Government, you'd better not continue your sponsorship with the USOC if they send a team. When you think about how much Coca-Cola the Government buys (for military bases, Coke machines in gov't office buildings, etc), you realize that the sponsors would have folded quickly, and then the tax-exempt status would have been irrelevant--they wouldn't have had any income to tax.

      (I'm not 100% sure that Coca-Cola was one of the sponsors--I think they were but it doesn't matter. There aren't many large corporations that don't sell lots of their products to the government.)

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      • #18
        Your point regarding the sponsor angle makes sense, and I don't doubt for a second that you know exactly what you're talking about. But again, I just can't see any possible sanctions, from what was for all intent and purposes a lame-duck administration, causing the USOC to cower in the corner. Were it Reagan and the Moscow situation in '84 instead of '80? Ok. He's going to be around for 4 more years, has all the power any president could ever have.

        Why the Carter administration at that point would strike fear into anyone's heart is beyond me. It certainly didn't scare some college kids in Iran.
        There are no strings on me

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        • #19
          Originally posted by guru
          I just can't see any possible sanctions, from what was for all intent and purposes a lame-duck administration
          That's easy to say with hindsight. The USOC decision was made in April, 1980. I'm not sure everyone knew then that Carter would not be re-elected in November. I didn't.

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          • #20
            Re: Alltime chokes in sports bureaucracy history

            Originally posted by DrJay
            OK, we have a "chokes in track history" thread. What are some of the greatest "chokes" in sports history made by officials/drug testers/management/coaches/politicos? I'll throw out the 1980 Olympic boycott as another nomination to get things going.

            Don't want to sidetrack the boycott tangent (interesting), but I'll place my vote for:

            #1. (large scope) The morons who awarded the 1968 Games to Mexico City--unfair to non-altitude born distance runners and producing a slew of artificial sprint times it would take an entire T&F generation (and some state of the art track surfaces) to overcome at sea-level.

            #2. (small scope) The morons who first put Jim Ryun in the wrong heat because his 3:52 Mile time was believed to be a 1500m. time and thus very slow, and who then refused to even consider reinstating him after he was fouled/tripped in the prelim race--depriving all T&F fans of the drama of seeing a fit Ryun at a sea-level venue take on defending champion Kip Keino and (soon-to-be champion) Pekka Vasala.


            Coincidently, both of these concern Ryun; talk about a star-crossed Olympic career!

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            • #21
              Of course the idiots who created and continue to perpetuate the 1600 meter distance for US high school runners.

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