Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The War

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I'm watching the series earnestly, but I don't find it as compelling and tight as his previous ones on the Civil War or baseball.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by bad hammy
      The factoid I liked so far is that US automobile production went from (and I am now making up these numbers 'cause I don't remember the actual figures, but you get the point) a million cars a year to 169 total from 1942-1945. My question is - who got those 169 cars??
      Maybe my Dad got one of them... I remember our 1942 Ford, and my Dad said it was one of the last ones off the line ! True remembrance here.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by dukehjsteve
        Maybe my Dad got one of them... I remember our 1942 Ford, and my Dad said it was one of the last ones off the line ! True remembrance here.
        Dukehjsteve, I got curious (it's the never ending hunt for trivia and other arcane crap!) and looked it up on Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_Ford#1942

        "Ford halted its car and truck lines on February 10, 1942 to begin war production, but not before a short run of 1942 cars was built. Changes were made to the car besides a three-part "electric shaver" grille — the frame was lowered and softer springs were used to improve the ride. War rationing required auto makers to black out their chrome trim, and a Special Fordor model was produced with no chrome at all for military use. The pickup received new styling as well, with heavy vertical bars, and truck production lasted through March 3."

        cman

        Comment


        • #19
          It has definitely grown on me. The first hour and a half of the first episode was a bit of information overload but I eventually got into the pacing and rhythm of the series. It plays back to back on two different PBS channels up here in the PNW so I've been getting a second and third crack at absorbing the info.

          By the way, I've never seen so many severed heads since Time magazine was printing photos of decolonization of Africa during the early 60s. The amount of coverage of the Americans of Japanese ancestry is unprecedented...and I haven't heard the "J" word used that much since I was a kid.

          cman

          Comment


          • #20
            I saw Burns on the Daily Show, last night. He explained that he and his partner were able to come up with so much "new" (unseen) footage was that they spent 6 years on this project, whereas most documentaries are done over months. He also stressed that this was the perfect time for such a project, as the age of most of the surviving soldiers emboldened them with a sense of urgency to share the entire story of their experience. It provided a very interesting insight into the way he thinks and works. It will probably replay early this evening on Comedy Central, if anyone is interested.

            Comment


            • #21
              I've watched every minute and think it's superbly made and a compelling mix of history, social observation and commentary, human interest, the horrors of war and how people react to it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Episode 5: Fubar has just started. They've dropped the "F" bomb twice already. :P

                cman

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by cullman
                  Episode 5: Fubar has just started. They've dropped the "F" bomb twice already. :P

                  cman
                  They did not bleep it out ? They were on my telecast in Indiana.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Kevin Richardson
                    He also stressed that this was the perfect time for such a project, as the age of most of the surviving soldiers emboldened them with a sense of urgency to share the entire story of their experience.
                    Caught the first episode re-broadcast last night. I fully agree with this sentiment. Anyone who sees any five minute segment from this series will get a big lesson in history, and realize that no other scrap in recent history comes even close to WWII in scope, scale, and sacrifice.

                    I've recently been re-reading several accounts of the Manhattan Project, and of how these regular scientists and their families had their lives turned upside-down to move to Los Alamos, NM. But, it's rare you really see the plight of the average American citizen. I think Burns' doc is a must see for everyone, to understand exactly what real war is.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by dukehjsteve
                      Originally posted by cullman
                      Episode 5: Fubar has just started. They've dropped the "F" bomb twice already. :P

                      cman
                      They did not bleep it out ? They were on my telecast in Indiana.
                      I guess us Bay Area lefties are deemed too sensitive to hear that word - they bleeped it out here too.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by dukehjsteve
                        Originally posted by cullman
                        Episode 5: Fubar has just started. They've dropped the "F" bomb twice already. :P

                        cman
                        They did not bleep it out ? They were on my telecast in Indiana.
                        We get WTVS Detroit PBS in Delta, BC. It wasn't bleeped in the first one but was in the repeat telecast. Seattle PBS bleeped it out.

                        The rest of the episode was incredibly hard hitting. I pretty much lost it during every segment.

                        cman

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Slowly weeping my way through this thing (locally we've had some regional-interest add-ons as well, such as The Nisei and Soldados). Watched the penultimate one last night. Battle of the Bulge and Iwo Jima, mainly.

                          They got into battle fatigue/shell shock, etc. Said that was reponsible for 1 in every 4 soldiers lost. But the "fact" that really shocked me was that the War Department decided that the normal man could take only 240 days in battle "before going mad." But they weren't worried about it particularly, because not many made it that far anyway.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by gh
                            the normal man could take only 240 days in battle "before going mad."
                            I would think (and Tim O'Brien says as much in The Things They Carried) that after being in harm's way and seeing your friends' heads blown off on a routine basis, one wouldn't make it much past a week without becoming totally desensitized to the Evil around you and become insane with apathy.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by bad hammy
                              The factoid I liked so far is that US automobile production went from (and I am now making up these numbers 'cause I don't remember the actual figures, but you get the point) a million cars a year to 169 total from 1942-1945. My question is - who got those 169 cars??
                              One '43 Chevy coupe went to a Mr. Burge just outside Ellensberg, WA. I learned to drive in the cool machine (and also on a J.D. tractor) who lived on our ranch when I was a boy, in 1947.

                              I still haven't run across one of those '43 pennies.....

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X