Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Placebo Effect

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Placebo Effect

    Interesting article linked on home page. I am firmly 100% convinced that if you gave an athlete a placebo, telling him it had twice the effect of steroids with NO side effects, he would make significant gains in the weight room, and achieve much better performances. You can ALWAYS work harder in the Weight Room or on the track, but often lack the will. With the Super-Pill in your system, you will gain the will to work harder and you WILL improve faster!

  • #2
    Sugar Pills and Sports

    An ABA coach used to allow his players to take "oxygen" from what were really empty tanks when they played Mile High Denver, complaining about the altitude. He said they played better after using the tanks. To paraphrase Yogi Berra, a lot of sport, at that level, is mental. If placebos work as remedies, they'd work for performance.

    In T & F, Gale Sayers, h.s. track coach at Omaha Central, Frank Smagacz, before Sayers' final jump vs. Bobby Williams of Lincoln in the state meet, played a mind game as his athlete walked back to his mark. The coach moved the towel where Gale had just landed at 23'6", a little shy of what he needed to clinch, up about a foot and a half. Aiming for the towel, Sayers leapt 24'11" and change, setting a state mark that stood for years (and would have placed in the Big Eight Relays that year).

    BCB

    Comment


    • #3
      That's a nice story about Sayers, and there's a similar story about Jesse Owens in the LJ qual at the '36 Olympics.

      But here's the question for any long jumpers out there. Suppose I put a marker in the pit, or beside the pit. When you're standing at the head of the runway, can you really see it? And when you're taking off the board, are you looking at the marker? And when you're in the air, and finally see the marker, is there much you can do to extend to reach that marker that isn't already determined by everything that went into the takeoff?

      In other words, does that marker do much good?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dj
        In other words, does that marker do much good?
        The marker often works because it (can) alters the angle of takeoff, which is typically too low (in HS). If you're running fast, the higher the t/o angle (relatively speaking) the farther you go.

        It works great in the HJ and PV to LIE to your athlete when you say how high the bar is.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dj
          In other words, does that marker do much good?
          NCAA, USATF, IAAF and HS all allow markers adjacent to the runway but prohibit markers on the runway or in the landing area. NCAA allows a marker adjacent to the landing area but the other rules do not speak to this point.
          Surprisingly, NCAA TJ rules do not prohibit a marker between takeoff board and pit. . (unless that has been changed since 2007)
          The only benefit I can see to a target marker is it may inspire the jumper to try to extend farther trying to reach the marker. Once you leave the board at a given speed and angle about all you can do is maintain balance and try to extend the maximum without falling back.

          Comment


          • #6
            My take on the marker, from my experience, is that it serves as motivation for keeping your legs up higher in front of you, thereby delaying your point of impact.

            While I understand, in theory, the placebo, and many athletes MAY be lifting less than they can when going all-out in the weight room, I would not think it would have as much improving effect as an actual PED. My own experience with different types of OTC strenght supplements shows that some really do work that well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Placebo

              The subconscious has a powerful effect on the physical- which is why , under suggestion, hypnotists can convince a person a warm room is cold. Or that they cannot lift their left arm. Perhaps you have read the pyschological journal report of weightlifters who lifted personal bests under the impression there was a weight on the bar they had successfully lifted before, when in fact they hadn't.

              BCB

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dj
                That's a nice story about Sayers, and there's a similar story about Jesse Owens in the LJ qual at the '36 Olympics......
                Ecker's Olympic Facts & Fables effectively puts the lie to the Owens story, and it should also be noted (at least as Ecker tells it) that the supposed towel in that instance was before the board, not in the pit; was supposedly an aid to keep him from fouling; not reach any set distance.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lifting More Weight Than They Thought

                  In "Psychological Dynamics of Sport and Exercise" By Diane L. Gill, read the Verbal Persuasion section on the 1979 (Ness & Patton) study on weight lifting.

                  (also cited in "Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology" By Robert Stephen Weinberg, Daniel Gould)

                  see:

                  http://www.springerlink.com/content/p55l0486g771p723/

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X