Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the 2nd highest price you can pay for your country?

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is the 2nd highest price you can pay for your country?

    In discussing his wife's candidacy this past weekend, Bill Clinton said that John McCain had paid the highest price you can pay for your country, short of giving your life. I disagree with that statement because I feel that there are many vets who would gladly trade places with John McCain, including amputees, parapalegics, burn victims and brain damage victims to start with. But of course, we can never fully appreciate what it's like to spend five years in the Hanoi Hilton. Supposedly, McCain tried to commit suicide four times. Having said all that, who really paid the higher price in Veitnam, John McCain or Max Cleland?

  • #2
    Re: What is the 2nd highest price you can pay for your count

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    In discussing his wife's candidacy this past weekend, Bill Clinton said that John McCain had paid the highest price you can pay for your country, short of giving your life. I disagree with that statement because I feel that there are many vets who would gladly trade places with John McCain, including amputees, parapalegics, burn victims and brain damage victims to start with. But of course, we can never fully appreciate what it's like to spend five years in the Hanoi Hilton. Supposedly, McCain tried to commit suicide four times. Having said all that, who really paid the higher price in Veitnam, John McCain or Max Cleland?
    Very difficult to measure differances in pain and suffering. I saw a tv documentary on a woman who had her legs removed and was dirt poor. She was happy and had no self pity while there are physically heathly millionares commiting suicide.
    phsstt!

    Comment


    • #3
      War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
      There are no strings on me

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by guru
        War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
        Couldn't agree more.
        "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
        by Thomas Henry Huxley

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by guru
          War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
          Thank you well put.
          You also leave a bit of yourself behind, an innocence, if you will,never to be recaptured.
          Tom Hyland:
          "squack and wineturtle get it"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by guru
            War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
            Reminds me of the great quote I think it went something like- Its not gutzy i reached the finish line of the marathon. Its gutzy i was at the starting line.
            phsstt!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by guru
              War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
              Not quite so sure of that. In 2006 I had the honor to be visiting professor of orthopaedics at Walter Reed Medical Center. I visited all the wounded on the wards and in the PT section. In the PT section was a woman whose chopper had been hit by an RPG and had lost both legs, one arm, and the other was badly damaged. Seems like a pretty high price. She later ran for Congress, and it was featured in USA Today, but I don't think she won.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bambam
                Not quite so sure of that. In 2006 I had the honor to be visiting professor of orthopaedics at Walter Reed Medical Center. I visited all the wounded on the wards and in the PT section. In the PT section was a woman whose chopper had been hit by an RPG and had lost both legs, one arm, and the other was badly damaged. Seems like a pretty high price. She later ran for Congress, and it was featured in USA Today, but I don't think she won.
                I remember her story and you're correct, she did lose.

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tammy_Duckworth

                I suspect that she might have won had she come out of the Iraq war in one piece. Sending a crippled woman to congress was probable too much for some people. Would the American elect a President who had been crippled in battle?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bambam
                  Originally posted by guru
                  War is hell, period. No matter what you bring home with you in terms of physical and/or emotional baggage, the "2nd greatest price" is paid as soon as you step on that battlefield. To try and quantify beyond that is a fools endeavour.
                  Not quite so sure of that. In 2006 I had the honor to be visiting professor of orthopaedics at Walter Reed Medical Center. I visited all the wounded on the wards and in the PT section. In the PT section was a woman whose chopper had been hit by an RPG and had lost both legs, one arm, and the other was badly damaged. Seems like a pretty high price.

                  I'll let you tell the guy who came back physically intact, but saw his buddy blown to 100 pieces in front of him by a roadside bomb, that his experience was more positive than hers.

                  Everyone who goes into combat has their own horror they have to live with, be it physical or mental. To say one experience is worse than another from an OUTSIDER'S perspective is just that, an outsider's perspective. That's why I say they all pay the 2nd highest price just for being out there, and one experience is no more valuable, or heart-rending, than another. We are not worthy of making that judgement.
                  There are no strings on me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by guru
                    We are not worthy of making that judgement.
                    I agree. Never having been in combat, I would never presume to comment on the experience other than to say that I have no quarrel with General Sherman's view of it ("war is hell").

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by guru
                      I'll let you tell the guy who came back physically intact, but saw his buddy blown to 100 pieces in front of him by a roadside bomb, that his experience was more positive than hers.
                      I'll bet that every one of those guys thinks to himself, "I'm glad it was him and not me." They may feel guilty about it. They may even be tormented about it for the rest of their lives, but they still think it. My Dad won a Bronze Star in Vietnam, but he says that he's grateful that he didn't win a Purple Heart. And he's still tormented by the things he did, the stuff he saw and the friends he lost. But he said that no soldier wants to win a Purple Heart.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jazzy, she might have had a better chance than you think, as Max Clelland (mentioned earlier) was in pretty much the same boat. He served as a US Senator and Director of Veterans Affairs. Right up until his opponent in his last election declared that he was not strong enough on defense. :shock:

                        This is like asking any group of people what heaven is like. Each argument made above is valid. For me, though, the second highest price to pay would be losing a child in battle.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kevin Richardson
                          For me, though, the second highest price to pay would be losing a child in battle.
                          The other side of that coin is pretty bad, too--a child losing a parent.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tandfman
                            Originally posted by Kevin Richardson
                            For me, though, the second highest price to pay would be losing a child in battle.
                            The other side of that coin is pretty bad, too--a child losing a parent.
                            Not even close, no matter how old the child is, they will learn to live with the lose, the parent will never learn to live with it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Second highest price I could pay?

                              My life.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X