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  • All time high

    Talking about high prices on gasoline?...in the US?
    Don´t think so !?

    Hmm today prices reached 14 SEK/liter in Sweden (and probably about the same in many European countries....

    14 SEK/liter is about 8.50 USD/gallon (3.78 liter)...

  • #2
    Be honest -- how much of that is taxes? Apples and oranges.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gm
      Be honest -- how much of that is taxes? Apples and oranges.
      While apples and oranges, people still buy it. And are their overall taxes actually lower than in the US (excluding gas tax). This seems to be your assumption and may well be true, I just don't know. Clearly all this is complicated to compute since college and health care expenses are different too.

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      • #4
        Gotta love those economists who, last week in Dagens-Nyheter, stated the bensin prices would not breach the 14,00/ltr threshold.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Daisy
          Originally posted by gm
          Be honest -- how much of that is taxes? Apples and oranges.
          While apples and oranges, people still buy it. And are their overall taxes actually lower than in the US (excluding gas tax). This seems to be your assumption and may well be true, I just don't know. Clearly all this is complicated to compute since college and health care expenses are different too.
          Actually, it is quite simple. How much of that high gas price in Sweden is taxes?

          According to a CNN story:
          The main factor in price disparities between countries is government policy, according to AirInc, a company that tracks the cost of living in various places around the world. Many European nations tax gasoline heavily, with taxes making up as much as 75 percent of the cost of a gallon of gasoline, said a spokesperson for AirInc.

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          • #6
            Everybody pays taxes. The question is what is the payoff ... how do the tax payers benefit? Epelle has lived in California and Sweden. Whattya think, E?
            Do you get a reasonable return for those high tax rates?

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            • #7
              I like the idea of taxing the hell out of gasoline. Put a $2.00 per gallon tax on with the proceeds going to social medicine for everyone. The money cannot be used for the general fund, or anything else. Americans are adaptable. They will whine and cry, but they will still drive.

              A secondary benefit will be American auto manufacturers actually building a real gas-frugal auto instead of paying lip service. It appears the rest of the world can do it....so why can't we?

              The feds can offer relief to the airlines and trucking industry.

              Our old Chris Craft will become our cabin on the water. Hell, it already costs $5.00 per mile to run now. Will make a neat cabin without doing a thing. Just crank up those old Chrysler 440s every now and then just to hear em idle. Works for me. Meet me on the foredeck for cocktails and whale watching.

              Think of all the steel we can recycle from the crushed SUVs.

              I just topped off my Prius, 6.54 gallons for 318 miles at $4.49 per gallon, SF Bay area prices.

              Also, just heard that San diegoans are flocking to Tijuana, Mexico to fuel up. Something about the price being $2.54 per gallon. Pretty funny actually, Mexicans sneak up here to work and we sneak down there to buy gas.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gm
                Originally posted by Daisy
                Originally posted by gm
                Be honest -- how much of that is taxes? Apples and oranges.
                While apples and oranges, people still buy it. And are their overall taxes actually lower than in the US (excluding gas tax). This seems to be your assumption and may well be true, I just don't know. Clearly all this is complicated to compute since college and health care expenses are different too.
                Actually, it is quite simple. How much of that high gas price in Sweden is taxes?
                I don't think it is that simple. Clearly they pay way more because of high taxes at the pump but what if they then pay nothing for education? Then who's laughing at the pump? You have to factor in all taxes rather than one in isolation to calculate value.

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                • #9
                  Of the 14.00 SEK/l, it's 7.86 SEK/l which is taxes here in Sweden, a little more than half of the total.

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                  • #10
                    Daisy, the Swedes pay much higher income taxes as well. All that free stuff don't come cheap.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gm
                      Daisy, the Swedes pay much higher income taxes as well. All that free stuff don't come cheap.
                      All our non-free stuff does not come cheap either

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Daisy
                        Originally posted by gm
                        Daisy, the Swedes pay much higher income taxes as well. All that free stuff don't come cheap.
                        All our non-free stuff does not come cheap either
                        And that is the point. Just returned from a stint in Japan. Food costs are high but at restaurants the price listed includes tax, and there is no tipping. At my hotel in Kyoto, I made a brief long distance call within Japan and was charged 31 yen (about 30 cents). Anyone recall using a hotel/motel room phone in the US and not paying at least a few bucks? Gas over there converts to about $7.50 a gallon.
                        Public transport is wonderful and fast between cities. For a tourist, a day bus pass in Kyoto (as many rides as you like within city limits) is ~$5. Many bus routes and buses very frequent - at least every ten minutes. A good public transport system would seem to be part of the answer, but apparently too little and too late in the USA.

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                        • #13
                          Petrol Payoff

                          The payoff for high petrol prices in Hong Kong is that people don't buy cars, and those who buy them for show don't drive them daily. Air quality certainly benefits, and traffic safety too, but of course you need the geography for a convenient public transport system.

                          Quick Silver
                          Hong Kong

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                          • #14
                            Some in the US are taking things into their own hands:

                            http://www.10tv.com/live/content/crimet ... ml?sid=102

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                            • #15
                              I try not to complain about gas prices around my German counterparts. They just mock me. I think I'm gonna apply for a job as a motorcycle salesman.

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