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  • Bob H
    replied
    My was 80 years old when he died of medical malpractice. He had Alzheimer's at the time, and so the fact that the doctors totally botched the treatment of his kidney problem seemed less of a tragedy than it otherwise might have been. Perhaps if he had been himself, he might have dealt with the docs better than my mother did. I don't dwell on this. He was not himself, and hadn't been for several years.

    My father was a high school principal before he retired, and he was extraordinarily intelligent and knowledgable about a wide range of subjects. He was the kindest, most decent human being you'd ever want to meet. He taught me much of what I ever needed to know about life, both by instruction and by example. He also took me to my first track meet.

    Over the years, I've also thought of my father at many important moments in my life, and I've reflected on how he would have reacted to them. I believe he would have been proud of my successes, and forgiving of my failures. I can't truthfully say that I think of him every single day, but even without this thread, I would have thought of him today; he died on this date 21 years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • jamese1045
    replied
    Re: Your Dad

    Originally posted by bambam
    I have to do this because I need to tell somebody about this and my wife is in New Hampshire right now.

    Eight years ago to this day, my father died. He was a great Dad, as so many Dads are. He was always very supportive of any of my sports endeavours and worked hard to give me every opportunity he never had. Dad was a national calibre cyclist and speedskater who went to the Olympic Trials in both sports, though he never made the team. But interest in those sports was what got me interested in the Olympics and watching track & field.

    Dad had a great life - got pneumonia when he was 86 while still in very good health and died within a few days. Actually a great way to go, as we all must.

    The night before he died I drove up to Washington DC to see him at the hospital. The Tour de France was going on that day and we talked for awhile about it while he was lying in his hospital bed. It was a day on which Lance Armstrong crushed the field climbing the Hautacam.

    Dad asked me how Lance had done, and I told him "He put four minutes into the leaders on the Hautacam." He then told me he was tired and wanted to go to sleep, and that I should drive back to Durham. He died that night and those were the last words we ever spoke.

    They climbed the Hautacam today in the Tour and they just showed Lance on that climb from 2000. I guess its OK if I just cried a bit again.

    Any stories about your Dad?
    My dad was a U.S. Navy musician who collected boxes of diving and swimming medals and boxed competitively in his Fleet Championships. He said he palled around with Buster Crabbe and Wiesmuller, and some other athletes when he qualified for the '36 olympic swim trials. Don't know how much was fact, but he did have a slew of medals and some photos with Crabbe and some others in them.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhc68
    replied
    Thanks Bam, gm, and mojo. These are the best posts I've seen here in all these years.

    My Dad was always old as far as I knew! He was 48 when I was born, 62 years ago so he'd be 110 now. He passed away 21 years ago. A solid, stubborn Missouri farm guy who didn't graduate from high school until he was 21 -- I think that had something to do with his own dad wanting to keep him on the farm instead of going off to WW I. A little wiry guy with powerful, but gentle hands who always told me to avoid "roughnecks". He'd work 12 hours a day and then come home and watch TV wrestling and become enraged by the incompetence of the referees ( "Couldn't he see that low-blow !?!")

    During the Vietnam era he consistently counseled me to avoid the military, or if I couldn't, to join the Navy ("At least you won't have to sleep in the dirt!"). Thing is, my Dad had an old school, almost tribal, attitude. He could understand getting mad at the neighbors or your brother-in-law and wanting to fight him, but the idea of going half-way around the world to fight strangers never added up to anything he thought his family should be involved in. He was a genuinely odd guy. I miss him still.

    Leave a comment:


  • mojo
    replied
    The last time I saw my father was when I was 10 years old-on Christmas Day.
    He gave me a shiny red bike, my first two wheeler, as a present.
    I remember riding out to the car with him and he told me to ride safely and help my mum look after my brother and sister. He promised we would go horseback riding when he got back from his 3 month business trip to the Phillipines.

    I barely paid much attention to his words because I was so excited about the bike but to this day i can still see the old white station wagon turn the corner and go out of sight.

    He was killed in a car accident about three weeks later.
    I felt so guilty that my priority had been that bike and not saying goodbye.

    I kept riding the bike but i always felt a twinge of guilt and sadness when I did.

    That is a very moving story anout your dad bambam. Thanks so much for sharing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • gm
    replied
    That is a very moving story, Bill. Thank you for sharing something so personal.

    I am blessed to still have my dad (78) here to keep me grounded with tales of life back in the "good old days" -- you know, those good old days that really actually sucked for the most part.

    His father was killed when my dad was 3, and my dad had to go to work in the oil fields when he was 12 to help support the large family, but he still had time at school to be a manager for the track team at Baytown (TX) Lee HS, where they had some rather good relays over the years.

    Looking back through some of his faded pictures from the '40s when I was young sparked my interest in the sport, and he has always encouraged me despite the comparatively meager fiscal rewards to pursue my love of track and field.

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam
    started a topic Your Dad

    Your Dad

    I have to do this because I need to tell somebody about this and my wife is in New Hampshire right now.

    Eight years ago to this day, my father died. He was a great Dad, as so many Dads are. He was always very supportive of any of my sports endeavours and worked hard to give me every opportunity he never had. Dad was a national calibre cyclist and speedskater who went to the Olympic Trials in both sports, though he never made the team. But interest in those sports was what got me interested in the Olympics and watching track & field.

    Dad had a great life - got pneumonia when he was 86 while still in very good health and died within a few days. Actually a great way to go, as we all must.

    The night before he died I drove up to Washington DC to see him at the hospital. The Tour de France was going on that day and we talked for awhile about it while he was lying in his hospital bed. It was a day on which Lance Armstrong crushed the field climbing the Hautacam.

    Dad asked me how Lance had done, and I told him "He put four minutes into the leaders on the Hautacam." He then told me he was tired and wanted to go to sleep, and that I should drive back to Durham. He died that night and those were the last words we ever spoke.

    They climbed the Hautacam today in the Tour and they just showed Lance on that climb from 2000. I guess its OK if I just cried a bit again.

    Any stories about your Dad?
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