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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Pego
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    My diabetes doctor insists that I see an opthalmologist annually.
    Wise. Listen!
    I have seen the same opthalmologist for the past 15 years, since before I became diabetic. She says my eyes have remained remarkably stable and there is no physical reason that I cannot see out of the center of my left eye.
    She, and other doctors, have even said the bad eye might develop if I lost the sight of my good idea. Not a possibility I am eager to explore.

    Leave a comment:


  • no one
    replied
    glasses since 8 yrs. Contacts at 17 thru 20 primarily for basketball - then 'John Denver/hippy' glasses till 26 with contacts still for b-ball. I'm 'legally blind' - or so I've been told ... about 20/600. Currently have kept a number of the old ones as I can use for reading computer - like Hammy in prob 5 or so places. Had soft lense contacts but they kept getting cloudy.

    2 daughters and a son have had Lasik. They like

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  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    My diabetes doctor insists that I see an opthalmologist annually.
    Wise. Listen!

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    I always bring sunglasses to the ophthalmologist's whether or not it's a sunny day, just cuz of that. It's still painful to walk outdoors, but less so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by marknhj
    I go every few years to professionals who invade my personal space, peer at me, ask me trick questions, tell me if they can see cholesterol, and take delight in attacking my eyeballs with powerful puffs of wind. A few times they've taken a photo of my retinas with a flash so bright I'm almost blind for the next thirty minutes.
    What about those b*stards that put special drops in your eyes to 'dilate' (opti-talk for "let's play a great joke on this guy") them, so walking outside is like trying to navigate the surface of the sun - everything is a blinding white light! :shock:

    Leave a comment:


  • nevetsllim
    replied
    I've had glasses for about 10 years now but I've only started wearing them most of the time in the past 3-4y. I always have them with me because they are absolutely imperative for long-distances because I cannot see a thing without them (as I discovered at the World Indoors in Valencia when they fell out of my pocket in the cab on the way to Heathrow Airport.)

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by marknhj
    I go every few years to professionals who invade my personal space, peer at me, ask me trick questions, tell me if they can see cholesterol, and take delight in attacking my eyeballs with powerful puffs of wind. A few times they've taken a photo of my retinas with a flash so bright I'm almost blind for the next thirty minutes. In my mind they're ophthalmic opticians, hence my abbreviation. Of course I see an optometrist!
    Good. I'm glad to hear that. The only reason I mentioned it at all is that I know people who are sensible in almost every aspect of their lives except that they do not regularly see physicians, including specialists in certain fields. I've seen this omission result in terrible consequences.

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    Originally posted by marknhj
    On my return to LA I headed straight to the optician and a few days later had my first pair of glasses. . . . .I tried contacts a few times when offered free samples by opticians.
    Opticians are fine for getting glasses, but you really ought to see an ophthalmologist, or at least an optometrist, every few years. There's more to eye health than having the right corrective lenses.
    You know, it never occurred to me to walk into an establishment that sells glasses and say, "Hey mate, can't a see bloody thing, take your best shot and give us a pair of glasses". Perhaps I could get a better deal?

    I go every few years to professionals who invade my personal space, peer at me, ask me trick questions, tell me if they can see cholesterol, and take delight in attacking my eyeballs with powerful puffs of wind. A few times they've taken a photo of my retinas with a flash so bright I'm almost blind for the next thirty minutes. In my mind they're ophthalmic opticians, hence my abbreviation. Of course I see an optometrist!

    Steve, no idea what you mean...

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    My diabetes doctor insists that I see an opthalmologist annually.

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    Originally posted by marknhj
    On my return to LA I headed straight to the optician and a few days later had my first pair of glasses. . . . .I tried contacts a few times when offered free samples by opticians.
    Opticians are fine for getting glasses, but you really ought to see an ophthalmologist, or at least an optometrist, every few years. There's more to eye health than having the right corrective lenses.
    Mark probably misspoke when he said "optician." As we all know, opticians make them, but Optometrists prescribe them. And ophthalmologists are medcial doctors specializing in eyes.

    In any event, Mark, I bet I now know who your favorite lady hj'er is... and she's now the OG champ !

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by marknhj
    On my return to LA I headed straight to the optician and a few days later had my first pair of glasses. . . . .I tried contacts a few times when offered free samples by opticians.
    Opticians are fine for getting glasses, but you really ought to see an ophthalmologist, or at least an optometrist, every few years. There's more to eye health than having the right corrective lenses.

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    I've worn glasses for the past twenty years because of the French.

    Although I was always aware that I probably should wear them, from the time I reached the sixth form at school and was unable to read the hymn numbers posted at school assemblies, I'd never got around to it.

    But when I was 31, and working at a convention in Orlando, I found I was unable to avoid running into certain clients who were in a high state of emotional dissatisfaction at the services provided by a French registration vendor we had contracted with. Outrageously, they blamed me for the vendors shrug-shouldered and chain smoking customer service (lack of) ethic. After three days of groveling apologies, arranging for support staff to work throughout the night, and doing everything possible to deal with the problem, I'd had enough and resolved to avoid, if at all possible, three clients. This proved impossible because they always saw me before I'd spotted them in very large crowds. The result was another public and humiliating ass reaming.

    On my return to LA I headed straight to the optician and a few days later had my first pair of glasses. I remember the drive home to Manhattan Beach. I almost rear-ended a car in front of me as I was looking in wonderment at the clouds and trees. I had no idea you could see individual leaves and the various shapes within clouds.

    I tried contacts a few times when offered free samples by opticians. But, it took an age to insert them, a procedure I found most unpleasant. And anyway, I don't wear them for reading or looking at a computer screen so figured if I did, I'd have to get reading glasses.

    Other influences in my decision have been the numerous times I've witnessed friends being rendered temporarily blind by a spec of something getting under the lens, the lens relocating itself on their eyeball or it falling out altogether. The most memorable example of the latter resulted in my friend and I crawling on hands and knees on the beer soaked floor and under the feet of a pogoing punk rock crowd at the Marquee Club in London, circa 1975, looking for his MIA lens.

    I like wearing glasses and enjoy changing styles every year or so. Plus, I am rather partial to the librarian look on some women who wear them...

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    What a boring thread.

    I have worn glasses since I was 9 to "see" at a distance( and I NEED them !), and like a lot of people, started wearing bifocals in my early 40's to "uncorrect"( plain glass for this new bottom part) my glasses when I am reading, if I want to see at a distance at the same time. If all I am doing is reading/typing on the computer, I don't need/wear them.
    I wore hard contacts for a while before I needed bifocals, but when that occured, I gave up the contacts.
    I also have a special pair of "music" glasses that correct me at about 3-4 feet, for use solely while playing trombone in a few bands.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    People with two eyes sometimes have one eye corrected for distance and one for reading but I did not have that option. Nor, will my doctor perform lasik surgery on a one-eyed person just in case that patient is the 1 in 10,000 when something bad happens.
    In my old age, I have developed far-sightedness, so one contact lens is for near- and the other is for far-. It sounded weird when the doctor explained it to me, but it works like champ. I can see just fine, near and far now.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    I was born with strabismus (crossed eye) in my left eye and although there is nothing physically wrong with the eye, the optic nerves did not develop when I was a baby. Despite patching when I was four to five years old, I am legally blind in that eye with only periphiral vision. I have never seen things in three dimensions. It has not been a real handicap except in judging distances between about 8-12 feet. I can't tell how far my car is from the curb when parallel parking until the tires hit the curb. And, I am sure being blind in the left eye explains my inability to hit a fast ball right handed. Or, left handed.
    It does not affect my far distance judgement or ability to fire a rifle. It did not DQ me for military service during Korea although, when I was discharged, the doctors asked me how I got into the Army and advised me to claim service connected disability, l which I did not do.
    I had excellent 20/15 vision, far and near, in my right eye. I could read the song book two pews in front. At about age 35, I began to notice that other people did not have to get out of their cars and walk up to read street signs. From that time until I had cataract surgery lens implant last year, I required glasses for driving and television but could read anything including a computer screen at any comfortable distance.
    Around age 45, I experimented with both hard and soft contact lenses for my right eye only but since single vision contacts required glass for reading, I soon gave up on them.
    I have had bi-focals, both progressive and regular, but could never read very well with them and constantly sat on and lost them. Photochromatic lenses were convenient but cut down on my indoor, low light vision and I did not like the sunglasses in the house image.
    When I had the lens implant I was given a choice of far or closeup vision. Having been near sighted for thirty years, I decided to try far sighted for the next thirty. Now I can see from here to as far as you can point but can't read my cell phone without glasses. Still not sure which is bigger nuisance. Now, I have a handful of drug store reading glasses scattered around the house and car.
    People with two eyes sometimes have one eye corrected for distance and one for reading but I did not have that option. Nor, will my doctor perform lasik surgery on a one-eyed person just in case that patient is the 1 in 10,000 when something bad happens.

    Leave a comment:

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