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  • LHC to fire up on Sep 10th!

    I recall discussing this before, but thought I'd create a new thread as a public-outreach service.

    For those with a passing interest in the "other" stuff I do, there's big news on the horizon for ... well, all of physics! The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will begin beam testing this Wednesday, with plans to bring the experiment to full energy by early next year. The LHC will collide protons head-on at energies that will re-create conditions like those that existed shortly after the Big Bang (the energy is 14 TeV per collision, for those who are scientifically-inclined). The energy of each collision is almost 1,000,000 times the energy released from a typical fission or fusion reaction.

    There's a good overview on the BBC's website here:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7543089.stm

    The LHC website has another good (non-technical) overview:

    http://www.interactions.org/LHC/what/index.html

    The big expectations for the LHC are, in order of likelihood:

    1. Discovery of the Higgs particle -- will explain where mass comes from.
    2. Discovery of supersymmetry (every particle has an "evil twin" that acts like a force)
    3. Detection of extra dimensions of space!

    If anyone is interested in learning more, PM me or post to this thread. The LHC going on-line will mark the culmination of almost 25 years of planning, and a decade of construction (at an historically-unprecedented price tag for particle physics). This is an exciting time for my discipline!

  • #2
    You're gonna destroy us all!!

    (Or discover God! Have you read Blasphemy?)
    You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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    • #3
      Re: LHC to fire up on Sep 10th!

      Originally posted by JRM
      1. Discovery of the Higgs particle -- will explain where mass comes from.
      well jeeez, I can tell you that one - too many carbs! :roll: :twisted:

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      • #4
        One of the founders of FAST and editor of FASTracks for many years, was Dave Carey, who also co-wrote the American Women's Record Progression with Scott Davis. Dave is a physicist who works at Fermilab and I'm sure he has more than a passing interest in the LHC coming on-line.

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        • #5
          Has the Large Hadron Collider destroyed the world yet?

          http://hasthelargehadroncolliderdestroy ... ldyet.com/

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gh
            Has the Large Hadron Collider destroyed the world yet?
            Unfortunately, for one young girl and her family, yes.

            http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/w ... 727903.ece
            There are no strings on me

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            • #7
              No wonder nobody was answering at the United Airlines help desk.

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              • #8
                Oh well. That was fun while it lasted. The end of the world has been delayed. Please mark your calendars.

                ===========================================
                Helium leak forces two-month shutdown at LHC

                Posted by Michelle Meyers

                The world's largest particle collider has been shut down for at least two months due to a large helium leak stemming from an incident Friday, officials said.

                The Large Hadron Collider is a gigantic particle accelerator located in a nearly 17-mile-long circular tunnel along the French-Swiss border about 330 feet underground. It was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, also known as CERN.

                The collider was officially launched on September 10 when the first particle beam was successfully sent around the full circuit. On the heels of an earlier malfunction due to a faulty transformer, CERN said Friday's incident was most likely caused "by a faulty electrical connection between two magnets, which probably melted at high current leading to mechanical failure." At no time was there any risk to people, CERN added.

                Complete story: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-10047185-76.html

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                • #9
                  10 Billion dollars....and it leaks!!!!!?!?!?!? :evil: [/b]
                  You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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                  • #10
                    I just watched a documentary, shot in 2007, on the construction of this contraption. This aint just a circular tunnel.. Unbelievably immense and complex.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JRM
                      The world's largest particle collider has been shut down for at least two months due to a large helium leak stemming from an incident Friday, officials said.
                      Oh you sheep. You actually bought that disinformation?! There was no helium leak. That's what the Illuminati want you to believe. Did you not read Angels & Demons? This collider is merely another means of establishing the New World Order. The Priory of Zion had it built to blackmail the G-9 heads. It makes ANTI-MATTER and it got shut down because the containment buffer was defective!! As soon as the tachyon array is reinitialized, it'll be back on line.

                      Get your heads out of the sand, people! MattM would have told you this before now, except for the fact that Nurse Ratchet took away his internet privileges.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lonewolf
                        I just watched a documentary, shot in 2007, on the construction of this contraption. This aint just a circular tunnel.. Unbelievably immense and complex.
                        The LHC project is extensive, no question. CERN itself has a massive campus. Note that the circular tunnel has existed for some time, too. Long before it became the LHC, the tunnel housed the LEP (Large Electron-Positron) collider.

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                        • #13
                          JRM - is the LHC in anyway supposed to help solve the dark matter/dark energy puzzle, or is that a problem needing other solutions?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bambam
                            JRM - is the LHC in anyway supposed to help solve the dark matter/dark energy puzzle, or is that a problem needing other solutions?
                            Evidence for dark matter is one of the laundry-list items that the LHC is expected to find, but this is nested within another project -- the search for supersymmetry. Basically, evidence for supersymmetry will show itself in the form of new particles that are otherwise invisible to us. There are a number of theories that suggest dark matter is simply the "lighest supersymmetric partner" (LSP) of an already-existing particle (most likely the neutrino's partner, the neutralino, or possibly the photon's partner, the photino).

                            Supersymmetric particles aren't thought to be stable, which is why we can't see them not (they decayed away long ago). But, in some circumstances the LSP can be stable, in which case it's floating around in the universe and being a little gravitational pest -- hence dark matter.

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                            • #15
                              My local radio station educated me to the fact that it is not pronounced coll-eye-der but rather coll-ih-der. Must be a physics thing.

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