Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

John Konrads selling all his golds

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • John Konrads selling all his golds

    http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/oly ... 32595.html


    sad

  • #2
    Re: John Konrads selling all his golds

    Originally posted by gh
    http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/olympics-hero-says-goodbye-to-gold/2008/10/31/1224956332595.html


    sad
    Many former Olympic champs finish up years later in very poor conditions. I was not too surprised to read that Shirley Strickland was reduced to selling her medals. I believe she was looking after her grandchildren and needed ready cash quite often.

    On a somewhat related note, who were the women who lead the torch parade in 2000 in Sydney? I recall Cuthbert, Strickland, Boyle and Kathy Freeman - was there anyone else? (Dawn Fraser? - but she was always out of favor with the powers that be.). For me, the most moving moment was to see Cuthbert in a wheelchair (pushed along by Boyle). This was the woman who won four Oly golds over 8 years, and prompted that most unforgettable of lead headlines in a major (city, Melbourne) newspaper in 1956 with her anchoring the 4 x 100 m relay victory. "Betty, You Beaut".

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: John Konrads selling all his golds

      Originally posted by catson52
      in 1956 with her anchoring the 4 x 100 m relay victory
      americans drop the baton that meet ?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: John Konrads selling all his golds

        Originally posted by eldrick
        Originally posted by catson52
        in 1956 with her anchoring the 4 x 100 m relay victory
        americans drop the baton that meet ?
        Given your knowledge of TFN, I presume your comment was missing a smiley face. Cuthbert overtook Armitage (GB) on the anchor leg for the gold. The US got the bronze with Wilma Rudolph running the third leg.

        Comment


        • #5
          no smiley

          modern times tells us that if americans have a good run, they shoud be no worse than 2nd

          if they were outside this in the"ole" days, then either they ran crap or had got some inadequate talent on show

          looking at this event, it looked severely under-developed until ~ '64 when poland (?!), presumably with irena put the record to a respectable level with 43.69

          a very arcane correlation is that the relay record shoud be ~ 1.5s faster ( maybe upto 2s ) than men's individual 400wr at the time if relay is not under-developed

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by eldrick
            no smiley

            modern times tells us that if americans have a good run, they shoud be no worse than 2nd

            if they were outside this in the"ole" days, then either they ran crap or had got some inadequate talent on show

            looking at this event, it looked severely under-developed until ~ '64 when poland (?!), presumably with irena put the record to a respectable level with 43.69

            a very arcane correlation is that the relay record shoud be ~ 1.5s faster ( maybe upto 2s ) than men's individual 400wr at the time if relay is not under-developed
            The US women were not really a "world force" from about 1936 until about 1960. The 60's Poland team were helped considerably by Eva K, who had other unfortunate problems in the mid--late sixties. Her anchor leg against the WG team at the 1966 Euros (making up over 5 m to win) stands out.

            Comment


            • #7
              checking the books, americans between '48 - '60, out of a possible 18 medals over 100/200 garnered an absolutely pathetic

              1 bronze

              this fact alone shoud underline the under-development of sprints at the time

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eldrick
                checking the books, americans between '48 - '60, out of a possible 18 medals over 100/200 garnered an absolutely pathetic

                1 bronze

                this fact alone shoud underline the under-development of sprints at the time
                You mean 48-56, right?

                And what sort of a criterion is that, anyway? Americans won no medals in 1972 or 1976 - would you say the women's sprints were less developed then than they had been in the 1960s, when US sprinters were dominating?
                Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: John Konrads selling all his golds

                  Originally posted by catson52
                  On a somewhat related note, who were the women who lead the torch parade in 2000 in Sydney? I recall Cuthbert, Strickland, Boyle and Kathy Freeman - was there anyone else? (Dawn Fraser? - but she was always out of favor with the powers that be.). For me, the most moving moment was to see Cuthbert in a wheelchair (pushed along by Boyle). This was the woman who won four Oly golds over 8 years, and prompted that most unforgettable of lead headlines in a major (city, Melbourne) newspaper in 1956 with her anchoring the 4 x 100 m relay victory. "Betty, You Beaut".
                  The women in Sydney were:

                  Betty Cuthbert (pushed by Boyle)
                  Dawn Fraser
                  Shirley Strickland
                  Shane Gould
                  Debbie Flintoff-King
                  Cathy Freeman

                  Marjorie Jackson would have been in it but she had a leg problem and so was one of the eight gold medallists who carried the Olympic flag into the stadium

                  Originally posted by eldrick
                  checking the books, americans between '48 - '60, out of a possible 18 medals over 100/200 garnered an absolutely pathetic

                  1 bronze
                  and this bronze (the very first Olympic medal won by an African-American female I think) was (30 years later) found to be an incorrect result and should have actually been awarded to Shirley Strickland.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: John Konrads selling all his golds

                    Originally posted by Vault-emort
                    Originally posted by catson52
                    On a somewhat related note, who were the women who lead the torch parade in 2000 in Sydney? I recall Cuthbert, Strickland, Boyle and Kathy Freeman - was there anyone else? (Dawn Fraser? - but she was always out of favor with the powers that be.). For me, the most moving moment was to see Cuthbert in a wheelchair (pushed along by Boyle). This was the woman who won four Oly golds over 8 years, and prompted that most unforgettable of lead headlines in a major (city, Melbourne) newspaper in 1956 with her anchoring the 4 x 100 m relay victory. "Betty, You Beaut".
                    The women in Sydney were:

                    Betty Cuthbert (pushed by Boyle)
                    Dawn Fraser
                    Shirley Strickland
                    Shane Gould
                    Debbie Flintoff-King
                    Cathy Freeman

                    Marjorie Jackson would have been in it but she had a leg problem and so was one of the eight gold medallists who carried the Olympic flag into the stadium

                    Originally posted by eldrick
                    checking the books, americans between '48 - '60, out of a possible 18 medals over 100/200 garnered an absolutely pathetic

                    1 bronze
                    and this bronze (the very first Olympic medal won by an African-American female I think) was (30 years later) found to be an incorrect result and should have actually been awarded to Shirley Strickland.
                    Thanks for the details. Certainly brings back many memories.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X