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  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by cullman
    Question 5

    Big Bill and Dandy Dan Miller were brothers
    Ivan and Karol Kalmikoff (not real brothers)
    Boris and Nicoli Volkoff (not real brothers)

    cman
    Big Bill and Dan Miller..???? Wow :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • cullman
    replied
    Question 5

    Big Bill and Dandy Dan Miller were brothers
    Ivan and Karol Kalmikoff (not real brothers)
    Boris and Nicoli Volkoff (not real brothers)

    cman

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Re: *** { Trivia } ***

    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Texas
    Think...old! I have the original 8-)
    OK, you sent me on a google search. You have this one?

    Originally posted by wiki
    The song was originally recorded by Burnett as "Farewell Song" printed in a Richard Burnett songbook, c. 1913.
    I'm talking about the first time we read..."I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow"..on a record label. That would be...(I have this one)

    ARTHUR, EMRY

    Date of Birth: Ca. 1900
    Place of Birth: Wayne County, Kentucky
    Date of Death: 1966
    Marital Status: Divorced
    Musical Syle: Country-Folk
    Talents: Singer, Songwriter, Guitar

    Recommend Record Albums:
    "I Am a Man of Constant Sorrow" (Old Homestead)


    Biography:

    He is remembered today by Old Time music fans and Folk song students, but in his prime, from 1928 to1935, singer and songwriter Emry Arthur was one of the most popular and prolific early Country singers. He was one of the best singers to come from the rich Kentucky Folk tradition and one of the best to translate that tradition into commercial terms. He recorded some 78 sides for major labels like Vocalion and Decca and for the independent Paramount and Lonesome Ace labels. He was the first to record the haunting I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow, the Bluegrass standard made famous by the Stanley Brothers years later. Arthur was born in the remote Elk Spring Valley in south central Kentucky, in an area rich in traditional musicians. His father was a collector of old songs and his brothers Sam and Henry (who were later to accompany him on some of his records) were skilled instrumentalists. Neighbors included Dick Burnett, Leonard Rutherford and William Rexroat, all of whom also recorded. When he was young, a hunting accident took one of his fingers, making him adopt a plain percussion guitar style that is heard on most of his records. About 1925, young Arthur moved to Indianapolis to work in factories and do other odd jobs. An audition for Vocalion Records (then an independent company, though later a division of ARC) brought him a contract and on January 17, 1928, in Chicago, Emry and his brother Henry recorded 10 songs. Two of the cuts, jaunty versions of the old Gospel songs Love Lifted Me and Shining For The Master, became hits and within six months the company wanted more. Arthur’s repertoire ranged from old Wayne County traditional songs like Going Around The World to old Pop songs like In The Heart Of The City That Has No Heart. By August 1929, though, Arthur’s professional and personal life fell apart. "I had to leave everything I had," he wrote and had to move to his brother’s home in Jacksonville, Illinois. His wife sued him for divorce and his recording contract was dropped. The Depression made work hard to find and soon he was working at a chair factory in Port Washington, Wisconsin, the very company that owned Paramount Records. When his bosses discovered who he was, more recordings followed, but none were successful. A short-lived stint with the independent West Virginia label Lonesome Ace also fell through. He managed to get a last session with Decca in 1934, redoing some of his old hits and cutting new songs like Empty Pockets Blues. Eventually he returned to Indianapolis, where he died in 1966.
    Charles K. Wolfe

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: *** { Trivia } ***

    Originally posted by Texas
    Think...old! I have the original 8-)
    OK, you sent me on a google search. You have this one?

    Originally posted by wiki
    The song was originally recorded by Burnett as "Farewell Song" printed in a Richard Burnett songbook, c. 1913.

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Re: *** { Trivia } ***

    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Texas
    4.Who recorded the original...."I'm A Man Of Constant Sorrow"..remember the movie?
    The Soggy Bottom Boys outta Cottondelia, Mississippi! :wink:

    The original was a turn-of-the-century folk song, but O Brother, Where Art Thou? sure made it famous.
    No not really. It's actually a very old tune. Yes it was reworked a litle differently for the movie but it's basically the same song. Think...old! I have the original 8-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: *** { Trivia } ***

    Originally posted by Texas
    4.Who recorded the original...."I'm A Man Of Constant Sorrow"..remember the movie?
    The Soggy Bottom Boys outta Cottondelia, Mississippi! :wink:

    The original was a turn-of-the-century folk song, but O Brother, Where Art Thou? sure made it famous.

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by Whitman
    5. I think these were real brothers:

    John and Chris Tolos
    Barry and Kendall Windham
    Kerry, Kevin, and David Von Erich
    Jerry and Nick Kozak
    Terry and Dory Funk
    Jack and Jerry Briscoe
    Mark, Ted, and Donn Lewin
    Jake Roberts and Sam Houston
    Bill and Scott "Hoss" Irwin

    Not brothers:

    The Von Brauners
    Gene and Ole Anderson
    Gene and Steve Stanlee

    Unsure:

    Brett and Buzz Sawyer
    Bill,Ed and Dan Miller
    Don and Al Greene
    Great job!!!!

    Now add..

    Art and Stan Neilson
    Doc and Mike Gallagher
    The Von Stroheims
    Rick and Scott Steiner
    Mike and Ben Sharpe
    Enrique, Ramon and Alberto Torres
    Rocket and Sputnik Monroe....haha!!!!!!!
    Jimmy, Johnny and Jerry Valiant
    Red and Lou Bastien
    Reggie and Stan Lisowski (who was also Stan Neilson...ha!)
    Jack and Jim Dalton

    Leave a comment:


  • Whitman
    replied
    5. I think these were real brothers:

    John and Chris Tolos
    Barry and Kendall Windham
    Kerry, Kevin, and David Von Erich
    Jerry and Nick Kozak
    Terry and Dory Funk
    Jack and Jerry Briscoe
    Mark, Ted, and Donn Lewin
    Jake Roberts and Sam Houston
    Bill and Scott "Hoss" Irwin

    Not brothers:

    The Von Brauners
    Gene and Ole Anderson
    Gene and Steve Stanlee

    Unsure:

    Brett and Buzz Sawyer
    Bill,Ed and Dan Miller
    Don and Al Greene

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    And in the you-can-find-anything-on-the-internet department, here's a site on the harmonica in Beatle music. Lennon playing dates back to at least early '62, predating Dylan's visit by months. No mention of Dylan as teacher

    http://www.vex.net/~paulmac/beatles/btt/little.htm
    Dylan had nothing to do with John Lennon and the harmonica. Then there was...

    Delbert McClinton

    A Million Highlights
    by Kerry Dexter

    Blues was a good part of life in far west Texas in the 1940s and 50s. Tex-Mex, country, roadhouse rock, folk, honky-tonk, and blues met and commingled as people came up from Mexico to pick cotton, passed through on their way to brighter dreams of California, or just explored the wide open spaces of the west. Delbert McClinton was born in Lubbock, a crossroads town where his father worked for the railroads and his mother was a beautician. The young McClinton sought a different path: music. "I think music was just born with me," he said, reflecting on a 40-year career that's seen him teach harmonica licks to John Lennon, share a Grammy award with Bonnie Raitt, and write and perform a basketful of creative genre-crossing country and blues roadhouse songs that still keep musicians, critics, and fans watching for his next move.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    And in the you-can-find-anything-on-the-internet department, here's a site on the harmonica in Beatle music. Lennon playing dates back to at least early '62, predating Dylan's visit by months. No mention of Dylan as teacher

    http://www.vex.net/~paulmac/beatles/btt/little.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    8. Dylan?

    cant be Dylan, hadnt meet him in yet in 63
    Dylan isn't much of a harp man. He barely gets by, more like a Jimmy Reed than a Little Walter.

    This guy spent some time over in England, there he'd meet up with the Fab Four and somehow got around to showing Lennon the basic harmonica licks. Not a rock and roller.

    Leave a comment:


  • SQUACKEE
    replied
    8. Dylan?

    cant be Dylan, hadnt meet him in yet in 63

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    3. is probably Johnny Mathis.
    Bingo!

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    3. is probably Johnny Mathis.

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    started a topic *** { Trivia } ***

    *** { Trivia } ***

    1.Who was the first athlete from the HBCU to gain a 1000 yds in an NFL season?

    2.Who is acknowledged as the first blues guitarist to record?

    3.What well known singer was also a notable (locally) high jumper in college?

    4.Who recorded the original...."I'm A Man Of Constant Sorrow"..remember the movie?

    5.Name 15 rasslin' brothers real or imagined...ha!

    6.Who was the first athlete from the HBCU to gain a 1000 yds as a receiver in an NFL season?

    7.Name 5 sub10.10 sprinters who played in the NFL. We won't count Jimmy Hines for obvious reasons.

    8.Who taught John Lennon the harmonica?

    9.Name 10 musical artists who have covered Robert Johnson tunes?

    10.Name 10 sprinters who were there in San Jose State/Speed City between 1958-1970
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