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  • pound makes racist statement about canada's indigenous peopl

    while i very much support his anti drug stance i am appalled at this statement
    mr pound made that"We must not forget that 400 years ago, Canada was a land of savages,"
    this is just straight up racism.
    i am a film maker and found out about when i received a copy of this letter.


    Letter to the President of the International Olympic Committee Ethics Commission

    Posted by Administrator
    Montreal, October 2nd 2008

    International Olympic Committee Ethics Commission
    Mr Youssoupha NDIAYE, Chairman
    Villa du Centenaire
    Avenue de l'Élysée 28
    1006 Lausanne
    Switzerland


    Dear Mr Chairman,

    The purpose of this letter is to lodge a complaint against Mr Richard Pound for uttering racist and discriminatory words causing a grave prejudice to Amerindians. He thereby contravened his duty as an Olympic official to “fidelity to the Olympic ideal inspired by Pierre de Coubertin” (foreword to the IOC Code of Ethics. The Olympic Charter stipulates that “Any form of discrimination with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement”.

    The facts

    Following a question by journalist Agnès Gruda,

    Q: And yet, since Beijing was chosen as host city for the Games, we have seen the repression of the Tibetan revolt, Chinese support to the Sudanese government against Darfur and the jailing of many dissidents. Don’t you find this embarrassing?

    Mr Richard Pound responds:
    “A: We must not forget that 400 years ago, Canada was a land of savages, with scarcely 10 000 inhabitants of European descent, while in China, we’re talking about a 5000-year-old civilization. We must be prudent with our great experience of three or four centuries before telling the Chinese how to manage China. The president of China has to make sure 1.3 billion people can eat two meals a day. Their situation is not comparable with ours”.

    These words were widely circulated because the interview was published in the first section of the Montreal daily La Presse, Saturday August 9th, 2008, and made available over the Internet afterwards on the site www.cyberpresse.ca (http://www.cyberpresse.ca/article/20080 ... ACTUALITES)

    The prejudice

    Mr Richard Pound is a distinguished man. He has been Chancellor of McGill University, member of the Quebec and Ontario Bars, member of the International Olympic Committee, president of the World Ant doping Agency, author of works about law and history. His social role as spokesperson for the Olympic movement and his professional titles confer upon him prestige giving his opinions an important stature in public opinion, and in the case before us, have a considerable impact on the people he is denigrating.

    Through his words, he is affirming that the Amerindians had no culture or civilization (“a land of savages”) and that only the presence of “scarcely 10 000 people of European descent” represents civilized life in the Canadian landscape. He reaffirms these words by speaking of our experience “of three or four centuries”, leaving the cultural and civilizing contributions of the Amerindian nations out of humanity’s heritage and Canadian history. Over the course of thousands of years of life in these lands, these nations have developed languages, cultures, social and political organizations, networks of trade exchanges, farming techniques, religions, artistic practices, sports (now Olympic Games events), diplomatic relations and environmentally-respectful models of development.

    Racial and ethnic prejudices against Amerindians have had tragic historical consequences: exclusion from political life, relegation on reserves, denial of social rights, expropriation of lands, locking up children in concentration-camp residential schools.

    This painful legacy is a long way from overcome since the marginalization of people belonging to First Nations remains to this day a constant challenge for the progress of human rights in Canada and throughout the Americas. Evidence of this is the solemnity of the recent official Parliament of Canada ceremony apologizing to residential school victims, the international community’s concern expressed through a Universal Declaration of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, the many awareness-raising programs about First Peoples’ history and current situation that have emerged to in Quebec and Canada, including the program established by the Quebec Commission on Human Rights and Youth (Commission des droits de la personne et de la jeunesse du Québec).

    When the most stubborn prejudices are suddenly bolstered by a public figure representing the prestige and authority of the Olympic movement, this is a significant step backwards for people who have organized to combat the discrimination First Nations have been victims of. Olympic prestige is the very reason the speaker of the aforementioned words will reach a significant audience through mass circulation media.

    The sanction

    Simply closing our eyes to the expression of discriminatory comments about First Nations would encourage bigots against Amerindian people to persevere in their sinister crusade, in other words, give ethnic and racial prejudice a free rein.

    Thus we call upon the IOC Ethics Commission for sanctions against Mr Richard Pound for his racist statements about Amerindians, and that a strong sanction be pronounced to let Canadians know the Olympic movement does not subscribe to Richard Pound’s racist creed, on the eve of the Vancouver Olympic Games.


    André Dudemaine
    Director
    InSights, society for the dissemination of Aboriginal culture

  • #2
    Good grief. I've never been a big supporter of Pound's harsh methods, but on this one I feel the need to back him up. He's not making up lies. What he says is a simple historical fact and nothing for modern folks with that heritage to be ashamed of or offended by. I can trace my lineage back to pagan-atheistic Saxon roots -- a bunch of flat-out barbarians, they were -- but I don't get offended or ashamed of it when historians point that out.

    I am what I am now, and I have no control over what my ancestors, 400 or 4,000 years ago, did or were.

    When "Political Correctness" prevents us from telling the truth about historical facts, we are seriously doomed. It's just a matter of perspective. He's not calling anyone nowadays "savages", he's just saying that Canada is a young civilization and that China has 4,500 more years of experience running a civilized country. If anything, he was being PC toward the Chinese.

    Comment


    • #3
      "Canada was a land of savages"....... I think savages is not a good discription of the natives who were living in peace with nature and other tribes. I'm aware there are exceptions.

      They may have been primitive in relation to the dudes with the boats and guns but not savages.
      phsstt!

      Comment


      • #4
        Gotta agree with Rich. A primary definition is:
        â–¸ noun: a member of an uncivilized people
        uncivilized itself is an un-PC word, but it merely is from the perspective of the 'more' civilized (technologically advanced) culture. It's all somebodyelse-centric semantics. No reason to get worked up. We, right now, are savages to our future selves or alien civilizations. I see that very clearly on a daily basis.

        Comment


        • #5
          Richxx87, Marlow, you can defend Pound as much as you want by semantics, finesse of language or intent.
          The fact remains that this statement is as naked, vicious, racist comment as one hears. Jimmy the Greek was a boy scout next to this.
          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
          by Thomas Henry Huxley

          Comment


          • #6
            From now on im gonna call Marlow a savage because the Marlow's from the year 2145 will be so much more civilized. I hope he doesnt mind. :P
            phsstt!

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't think Pound should lose his job over this but it a completely insensitive and inaccurate statement.
              Our indigineous people had a knowledge and relationship with the natural world that was highly sophsticated and remarkable. The art, jewllery, tools and houses they created using only raw materials are beautiful and to this day admired and collected by galleries and individuals around the world.



              The savages were the European explorers who came to this land with no regard for the people who lived there.

              If any of you are ever in Vancouver I urge you to visit the UBC Museum of Anthropology. You will see artifacts and structures that will leave you awestruck and erase any notion that native Canadians"savages".

              http://www.moa.ubc.ca/

              Shame on Dick Pound (this story first surfaced months ago by the way).

              Comment


              • #8
                As a guy who grew up on the coast of B.C., Pound would certainly be aware of the accomplishment of the Haida and other Northwest people. But as a wel educated man, and one who has spent most of his life on the east coast, he'd certainly be well acquainted with how the Iroquois and their brethren behaved. Anybody else remember Father Brebeuf? (not for the squeamish)

                <<....The captives were herded with sticks and clubs toward the nearby town of St. Ignace, the two Jesuits having been roughly stripped to the skin. At the entrance to the town all were forced to run a gantlet of screaming, mocking Iroquois, emerging on the other side bruised, slashed, and broken. About noon the torture began in earnest. De Brébeuf, whom the Iroquois evidently regarded as a special prize, was selected as the first victim, and Lalemant and the Hurons were made to witness his torments.

                A simple recital of the separate cruelties they wreaked upon his giant frame makes it clear, without benefit of gruesome adjectives, that his torture has seldom been equaled in the whole Christian martyrology. First they tied him to a post and scorched his entire body with fire, seeking to silence him as he exhorted the Christians among the Hurons to keep up their courage and put their trust in God, who would welcome them into Paradise after the brief time of trial ahead. As he continued to speak, the Iroquois thrust burning brands down his throat, but still he cried out to his followers, “Jésus taiteur!” (“Jesus, have mercy upon us!”) And from Lalemant and the Hurons the answer came back: “Jésus taiteur!” De Brébeuf had a moment of surcease as his torturers fashioned a rope of vines, strung metal axe-heads on it, and heated them red-hot in the fire. This they then placed around his neck. If he leaned forward, the axe-heads behind scorched his back; if he writhed backward, his chest felt the hot iron; if he stood still, the torture was doubled. As he bore each fresh torment without flinching or crying out, the fury of the Iroquois mounted. Next they fastened a girdle of pitch-filled bark around his waist and loins and set fire to it, but he still shouted encouragement to his flock. A renegade Huron who had been adopted into one of the Iroquois tribes now came close to de Brébeuf and said to him: “Echon, you have often told us that we must be baptized in order that we may have eternal happines after we die. In turn, we wish to be the cause of your happiness in heaven. Thank us, then, for the good turn we do you.” And, carrying out kettles of scalding water, they poured them over his head in derision of the Sacrament. Still the beleaguered Jesuit cried out, “Jésus taiteur!” At last, in a frenzy, the Iroquois came at him in a group, hacking at his flesh with their knives until a chief finally cut out his heart and ate it in triumph, thinking to absorb some of the white man’s prodigious courage. After four horrible hours Father Jean de Brébeuf, “the Ajax of the mission,” was dead.

                Though he was far less sturdy of body, Lalemant, whose trial began at nightfall, survived for fifteen hours, probably because the Indians revived him periodically through the long night so that they might save him for a dawn sacrifice to one of their gods. He endured as bravely as de Brébeuf and died with equal heroism, exhorting the Huron Christians to the last...>>

                That excerpt (which skips over the part about cutting out his tongue so he'd quit talking) from this

                http://www.americanheritage.com/article ... 6_54.shtml

                Comment


                • #9
                  There's a Brebeuf High School in Indianapolis, by the way, named after him, which a few decades back had one of the better high school sprinters in the nation.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    History of the western world is loaded with similar brutalities.
                    No European nation is exempt.
                    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                    by Thomas Henry Huxley

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SQUACKEE
                      From now on im gonna call Marlow a savage because the Marlow's from the year 2145 will be so much more civilized. I hope he doesnt mind. :P
                      Not at all - seriously. I think that much of what we 21st Century Americans do is horridly savage. The Death Penalty for example. People who shoot animals for SPORT (!!) is incredibly savage. I wear the skins of animals on my feet and think it STYLISH!!! We are a brutal, savage people. I would even say we are MORE savage than our forebears because we don't HAVE to live as we do, they did. I really, really can't get worked up about some guy calling people from 400 years ago savage . . . sorry.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: pound makes racist statement about canada's indigenous p

                        Originally posted by edmond
                        i am appalled at this statement mr pound made that "We must not forget that 400 years ago, Canada was a land of savages,"
                        I wasn't aware of any change in the situation . . .

                        :twisted:

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wait, I'm confused. I thought these were Canada's indigenous people -

                          There are no strings on me

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Marlow
                            Originally posted by SQUACKEE
                            From now on im gonna call Marlow a savage because the Marlow's from the year 2145 will be so much more civilized. I hope he doesnt mind. :P
                            Not at all - seriously. I think that much of what we 21st Century Americans do is horridly savage. The Death Penalty for example. People who shoot animals for SPORT (!!) is incredibly savage. I wear the skins of animals on my feet and think it STYLISH!!! We are a brutal, savage people. I would even say we are MORE savage than our forebears because we don't HAVE to live as we do, they did. I really, really can't get worked up about some guy calling people from 400 years ago savage . . . sorry.
                            Fine. Say, we are all savages. He made a clear distinction between the natives and 10000 immigrants.
                            "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                            by Thomas Henry Huxley

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pego
                              He made a clear distinction between the natives and 10000 immigrants.
                              Uncivilized, in this context, means 'less technologically advanced'. I think that we can all agree that by what we understand as 'technoadvanced', the Euros were. I think y'all are taking this waaaaay too seriously. 'Savage' in this context does NOT mean 'cruel' or 'amoral'. Let's not play the 'that's what SHE said' pre-pubescent game here, and spin the meaning to something it is not.

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