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End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 11:

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  • End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 11:

    11. Where is the Bridge of Sighs, what does it cross and why was it given that name?

    (don't confuse this with the Bridge Of Size, which crosses the Verazzano Narrows) :roll:

  • #2
    I have a faint recollection that it connects a prison to the city somewhere in Europe. Can't recall where and don't want to cheat.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley

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    • #3
      I know, I know - I saw it in my Navy travels (I don't think I actually stood on it). My hint is that it's not very big and it smells funky there (understandably).

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      • #4
        Venice; one of the canals; it's really gorgeous, so people sigh a lot.

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        • #5
          That's not why it's called the Bridge of Sighs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by richxx87
            Venice; one of the canals; it's really gorgeous, so people sigh a lot.
            Originally posted by tandfman
            That's not why it's called the Bridge of Sighs.
            It's not much to look at - more like an arch over an alley-way (watery that it is). I had to wiki it to remember the origin of the name but Pego was right. The sighs are very sad.

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            • #7
              Re: End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 11:

              Originally posted by gh
              (don't confuse this with the Bridge Of Size, which crosses the Verazzano Narrows) :roll:
              Sorry, but I believe you are the one who is confused.

              The Narrows is the tidal strait separating the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City. . . . The first recorded European entrance into the Narrows was in 1524 by Giovanni da Verrazzano . . . .In 1964, the Narrows were spanned by the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time, and still the longest suspension bridge in the USA (by length of the main span). Because the hyphen in the name is often omitted, the strait itself is sometimes erroneously called the "Verrazano Narrows."
              Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Narrows

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              • #8
                I don't know whether or not it crosses the Grand Canal (but that's the only one I can name in Venice), but I do know that it was used to transport convicted criminals into a prison (perhaps from the courthouse?).

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                • #9
                  Re: End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 11:

                  Originally posted by gh
                  11. Where is the Bridge of Sighs, what does it cross and why was it given that name?

                  (don't confuse this with the Bridge Of Size, which crosses the Verazzano Narrows) :roll:
                  Aha, but the "Bridge of Size" is allegedly in Boston!

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                  • #10
                    so we're clear, nobody has answered the question in full yet.

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                    • #11
                      Re: End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 11:

                      Originally posted by gh
                      11. Where is the Bridge of Sighs, what does it cross and why was it given that name?

                      (don't confuse this with the Bridge Of Size, which crosses the Verazzano Narrows) :roll:
                      This Nw Yorker never heard The Verazzano called Bridge of Size but has heard the Bridge on Boston Common Pond called Bridge of Size by a couple or 3 Boston folks
                      Tom Hyland:
                      "squack and wineturtle get it"

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                      • #12
                        Someone told me about this recently, maybe even showed me some pictures from a trip, and I can't for the life of me recall who or when or where. Unlike Pego, I want to cheat (never did it in school, need to start sometime) but will hold off on it and hope that several glasses of wine this Xmas eve jump start those neurons where this recent information is encrypted.

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                        • #13
                          Can't recall any travel photos recently, but an Impressionist exhibit at the Denver Art Museum in early September keeps coming to mind. I wonder if Monet or someone else painted The Bridge of Sighs? And yes, it is a bridge across which walked convicts, directly from their trial/sentencing, sighing because that would be the last time they'd see the outside world, or maybe sunlight. I don't recall if it led to death row or simply to a cell for life, but I suspect the former.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DrJay
                            Someone told me about this recently, maybe even showed me some pictures from a trip, and I can't for the life of me recall who or when or where. Unlike Pego, I want to cheat (never did it in school, need to start sometime) but will hold off on it and hope that several glasses of wine this Xmas eve jump start those neurons where this recent information is encrypted.
                            Not new, but fitting :wink: .



                            It is good to drink beer [ >> ]

                            There are a good number of very valid reasons for drinking beer, but the one that takes the cake is called the "Buffalo Theory". It originated in America and goes something like this:

                            A herd of buffalo can move only as fast as the slowest buffalo, and when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular culling of the weakest members.

                            In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells.

                            Excessive intake of alcohol, we all know, kills off brain cells, but, naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, constantly making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.

                            That's why you always feel smarter after a few beers.
                            "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                            by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pego
                              . . . you always feel smarter after a few beers.
                              Sigh!

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