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End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 13:

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  • gh
    replied
    13. It was a British dominion, which means it had the same semi-autonomous status as Australia, South Africa and Canada itself.

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Originally posted by bambam
    And Newfoundland actually competed at the Olympics once, sort of, in track & field, specifially the 1920 marathon. The footnote from my book on the 1920 Olympics concerning the marathon runner Eric Robertson, who finished 35th (last finisher):

    Ture Widlund has noted tha...
    Poor Ture....how often do folks get one of those "d"s in his last name tangled up with his first name?? :?

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  • bambam
    replied
    And Newfoundland actually competed at the Olympics once, sort of, in track & field, specifially the 1920 marathon. The footnote from my book on the 1920 Olympics concerning the marathon runner Eric Robertson, who finished 35th (last finisher):

    Ture Widlund has noted that either Eric Robertson or Albert Smoke (DNF) must not have competed or must not have been Canadian, because Canada would then have had five runners in the race, with only four allowed. It is possible that Eric Robertson was British, as he is listed as such by L’Independent Belge. But Robertson's finish and time were given only in Velo-Sport, which listed him as Canadian. In addition, prior to the start of the athletics competition, VS gave a list of all entrants by nation and listed Robertson with the Canadians (and Smoke, also). Finally, Robertson's number was 81, which places him with the Canadian squad, whose numbers ranged from 70 to 85.

    In their recent book on Olympic marathons, Roger Gynn and David Martin have elucidated Robertson's status. He was neither a Canadian nor a British citizen, but was, in fact, a citizen of Newfoundland, which was independent of Canada until 1949. But Newfoundland did not have a recognized National Olympic Committee in 1920, so Robertson attempted to compete for Canada. However, Canada already had four starters in the marathon race, the maximum allowable. Robertson had competed for several years in Britain, previously. Since Great Britain had only three runners in the Olympic marathon, even though he had no British citizenship, he was allowed to start for Great Britain as their fourth runner, because Newfoundland was a part of the British Empire.

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  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Things I learned recently: Queen Elizabeth II is still the Canadian Constitutional Head of State. And here I thought them Canuckians were independent!
    Just look at their money.....

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Things I learned recently: Queen Elizabeth II is still the Canadian Constitutional Head of State. And here I thought them Canuckians were independent!

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  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    I agree with wino... it was a separate country.

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  • wineturtle
    replied
    Re: End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 13:

    Originally posted by gh
    13. Newfoundland didn't join Canada until 1949. To whom did it belong before that?
    Itself. I believe it first was a British colony then self-governing then to a Canadian Province in the Truman Era

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  • richxx87
    replied
    uk

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 13:

    Originally posted by gh
    13. Newfoundland didn't join Canada until 1949. To whom did it belong before that?
    The Eskimos, I mean the Inuits!

    second guess: Donald Trump

    final answer: the Hudson Bay Trading Co.

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  • gh
    started a topic End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 13:

    End of Year Geography Quiz, Question 13:

    13. Newfoundland didn't join Canada until 1949. To whom did it belong before that?
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