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end of Year Geography Quiz, Question 21:

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    Originally posted by gh
    a quick Google finds a figure of -228ft for Salton Sea (or is that now down to Salton Puddle status?)
    Last time I saw it ( 3 1/2 years ago ) it looked like it still had plenty of H2O.

    So does this mean you should have said FOUR instead of three ?!
    no, it means the guy who created the quiz should have! (as he now admits in his errata/addenda)

    <<-- A reader who identified himself only as "rustam" pointed out that in our list of seas whose surfaces are below sea level, we should have included California's Salton Sea. He's right.>>

    I thought the original question was phrased poorly, because I took it that to satisfy the requirement one needed only name three of what was a larger number.

    Leave a comment:


  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    So you want to re-name the Caspian Sea as the Caspian Lake ?
    I want nothing of the sort. Everyone knows a guinea pig is not a pig, but that doesn't mean we should suddenly start calling it a guinea rodent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    That works fine, but you're not going to get people to re-name lakes that have been called seas for centuries.
    I won't be trying to do that, either.

    Originally posted by tandfman
    Also, it doesn't settle the question of what's the dividing line between lakes and smaller bodies of water like ponds.
    That distinction, to me, is just a matter of convention, and has no real meaning. A small body of flowing water may be called a creek, stream or whatever, but it still fits the definition of a river. Same case.

    Leave a comment:


  • cullman
    replied
    Originally posted by Pego
    Originally posted by cullman
    Sea of Galilee (largest fresh water lake)
    I thought the Lake Superior was the world's largest fresh water lake.
    Whooops...forgot the below sea level part.

    cman ops: ops: ops:

    Leave a comment:


  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by cullman
    Sea of Galilee (largest fresh water lake)
    I thought the Lake Superior was the world's largest fresh water lake.

    Originally posted by Powell
    I always thought the definition was very clear cut. If it's a part of the global ocean system, it's a sea. If it's unconnected to it, it's a lake (regardless of whether it has 'sea' in the name or not).
    Another definition is presence of fresh or salt water, isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    Originally posted by gh
    a quick Google finds a figure of -228ft for Salton Sea (or is that now down to Salton Puddle status?)
    Last time I saw it ( 3 1/2 years ago ) it looked like it still had plenty of H2O.

    So does this mean you should have said FOUR instead of three ?!
    Last time I saw it (yesterday) it still looked like it has plenty of h2o. Problem with the Salton Sea is it sometimes also has plenty of dead fish. It's big, 15 x 35 miles (mea culpa - had to cheat to get dimensions!)

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    Originally posted by cullman
    Getting a good definition of a lake is another matter.
    I always thought the definition was very clear cut. If it's a part of the global ocean system, it's a sea. If it's unconnected to it, it's a lake (regardless of whether it has 'sea' in the name or not).
    So you want to re-name the Caspian Sea as the Caspian Lake ?

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    a quick Google finds a figure of -228ft for Salton Sea (or is that now down to Salton Puddle status?)
    Last time I saw it ( 3 1/2 years ago ) it looked like it still had plenty of H2O.

    So does this mean you should have said FOUR instead of three ?!

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    That works fine, but you're not going to get people to re-name lakes that have been called seas for centuries.

    Also, it doesn't settle the question of what's the dividing line between lakes and smaller bodies of water like ponds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by cullman
    Getting a good definition of a lake is another matter.
    I always thought the definition was very clear cut. If it's a part of the global ocean system, it's a sea. If it's unconnected to it, it's a lake (regardless of whether it has 'sea' in the name or not).

    Leave a comment:


  • cullman
    replied
    Trivial Pursuit - Brain-Teasers and Lakes Edition ops:

    cman

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  • BillVol
    replied
    Where are you getting your questions, G?

    Leave a comment:


  • cullman
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Life and geography just ain't simple, are they?
    Caspian Sea (world's largest lake by surface area), Sea of Galilee (largest fresh water lake) and Dead Sea (lake with lowest elevation) are almost always the answer to weird below sea level bodies of water questions. Getting a good definition of a lake is another matter.

    cman

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    a quick Google finds a figure of -228ft for Salton Sea (or is that now down to Salton Puddle status?)

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Is not the Salton Sea in southern California also below sea level ?

    Leave a comment:

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