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  • Word of the Year

    The nominations are in.

    Some are oldies with new significance:
    Bailout
    Maverick
    Vet
    Subprime
    Taking a haircut

    Some are new, but obvious:
    Fringe English
    Obamamania

    But how many of these neologisms do you know?
    1. thinko
    2. toxic assets
    3. staycation
    4. recessionista
    5. shovel-ready
    6. bread crumbs

  • #2
    Toxic assets a no brainer.
    There are no strings on me

    Comment


    • #3
      Can't believe you missed "Lightning Bolt".

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by guru
        Toxic assets a no brainer.
        But it's fun as an oxymoron.

        Comment


        • #5
          How about "recession," a new euphemism for "depression."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tandfman
            How about "recession," a new euphemism for "depression."
            Apparently they are two different economic terms, or so we're led to believe. I know there's a difference between the two but don't ask me what it is. I'm sure there's an economist on the board who can explain.

            It's all semantic tho' if you're poor and out of a job!

            My word of the year? Syzygy, for obscure reasons.

            Comment


            • #7
              Slobber-knocked! I've heard it used several times this year after a lineman practically decapitates an opponent.
              If you're ever walking down the beach and you see a girl dressed in a bikini made out of seashells, and you pick her up and hold her to your ear, you can hear her scream.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by AthleticsInBritain
                Originally posted by tandfman
                How about "recession," a new euphemism for "depression."
                Apparently they are two different economic terms, or so we're led to believe.
                They certainly are two different economic terms. My point was that although everyone is calling this a recession, IMHO we're in the early stages of a real depression. The universal insistence on calling this something other than what it is may be breaking down. A Nobel Prize winning economist, Princeton Professor and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, now seems to agree with me.

                Let’s not mince words: This looks an awful lot like the beginning of a second Great Depression.
                http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/05/opini ... ugman.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tandfman
                  Originally posted by AthleticsInBritain
                  Originally posted by tandfman
                  How about "recession," a new euphemism for "depression."
                  Apparently they are two different economic terms, or so we're led to believe.
                  They certainly are two different economic terms. My point was that although everyone is calling this a recession, IMHO we're in the early stages of a real depression. The universal insistence on calling this something other than what it is may be breaking down. A Nobel Prize winning economist, Princeton Professor and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, now seems to agree with me.

                  Let’s not mince words: This looks an awful lot like the beginning of a second Great Depression.
                  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/05/opini ... ugman.html
                  Best definition was by Reagan - "Recession is when your neighbor is out of a job. Depression is when you're out of a job."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tandfman
                    Originally posted by AthleticsInBritain
                    Originally posted by tandfman
                    How about "recession," a new euphemism for "depression."
                    Apparently they are two different economic terms, or so we're led to believe.
                    They certainly are two different economic terms. My point was that although everyone is calling this a recession, IMHO we're in the early stages of a real depression. The universal insistence on calling this something other than what it is may be breaking down. A Nobel Prize winning economist, Princeton Professor and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, now seems to agree with me.

                    Let’s not mince words: This looks an awful lot like the beginning of a second Great Depression.
                    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/05/opini ... ugman.html
                    He has been using that word for quite a while, and even wrote a book on depression economics. I don't think you converted him.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No, I don't think so either.

                      Comment

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