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Brain Damage Reports Among Deceased NFL Players

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  • Cancer just claimed 85 year old Jack Charleton. He played centre-half alongside Bobby Moore on England's only World Cup winner in 1966. His younger brother Bobby was also on that team. Called Ireland's favorite Englishman he was Ireland's "gaffer." His obituary reported that he suffered from dementia for several years.
    Last edited by KDFINE; 07-29-2020, 01:34 PM.

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    • Yes I saw that last week...his more famous brother Bobby seems to be doing well. He was at Man U games last spring.

      Jack played at Leeds United when they had a fearsome reputation for aggression...

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      • I remember Charleton brothers quite well.
        "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
        by Thomas Henry Huxley

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        • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
          Jack played at Leeds United when they had a fearsome reputation for aggression...
          Despite it being some 45 to 50 years since their heyday, it is often still claimed that Leeds are the least popular team in the English game. Some of that is probably down to the hooligan fans that attached themselves to the club at about that time.

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          • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

            Despite it being some 45 to 50 years since their heyday, it is often still claimed that Leeds are the least popular team in the English game. Some of that is probably down to the hooligan fans that attached themselves to the club at about that time.
            And they made a fine movie about them, focused on Brian Clough of all people.

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            • we're wandeering rather far from the thread topic here

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              • Getting back to the subject from a surprisingly different angle....


                This Sledding Team Trained Hard for Gold in 2010. Some Members Regret It.


                In skeleton, the headfirst Olympic sledding sport, the opportunity for unlimited training on the track can be a huge advantage. But Canadian Olympians who had such access believe it was bad for their brains.

                The chance to host the 2010 Winter Games was supposed to be a godsend for Canadian athletes who compete in skeleton, the headfirst sled run down a twisting track.

                While most competitors get access to the track for just a handful of days leading up to the Olympics, the host country gets to practice far more, because its athletes are logistically closer and the sport’s rules allow it. The home team can memorize every detail of every turn on run after treacherous run.

                Mellisa Hollingsworth, who was favored to win a medal that year in skeleton, said she and her teammates took as many as 11 runs a day down the track, the fastest in the world, at Whistler, British Columbia, about 75 miles north of Vancouver. When a training session ended, they were so worn out they struggled to put sentences together. Noise was intolerable. Their brains felt scrambled.

                And that’s how Hollingsworth, now 39, and her teammates became case studies in a process that is beginning to realign how neuroscientists and a handful of coaches and athletes understand the connection between brain injury and sliding sports.

                https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/01/s...gtype=Homepage

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                • "sled head"!

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                  • Random sporting fact - the UK tops the all-time Olympic medal table in skeleton, despite having no tracks. This appears to be largely down to talent identification.

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                    • More likely Lottery funding...

                      Skeleton funding could be on the slide after failing to commit to success at Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang

                      Lizzy Yarnold and Great Britain’s other skeleton athletes were on Tuesday night in danger of being stripped of all their public funding after the sport failed to commit to delivering more than an eighth-place finish at the Winter Olympics.

                      Despite having been given £6.5 million in the four years leading up to Pyeongchang 2018 and boasting the defending women’s champion in Yarnold, the minimum target agreed between UK Sport and its most successful winter sport did not include winning a medal.

                      https://www.telegraph.co.uk/winter-o...uccess-winter/

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                      • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                        More likely Lottery funding...

                        Skeleton funding could be on the slide after failing to commit to success at Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang

                        Lizzy Yarnold and Great Britain’s other skeleton athletes were on Tuesday night in danger of being stripped of all their public funding after the sport failed to commit to delivering more than an eighth-place finish at the Winter Olympics.

                        Despite having been given £6.5 million in the four years leading up to Pyeongchang 2018 and boasting the defending women’s champion in Yarnold, the minimum target agreed between UK Sport and its most successful winter sport did not include winning a medal.

                        https://www.telegraph.co.uk/winter-o...uccess-winter/
                        That helps as well!

                        Yarnold was a heptathlete and pole vaulter as a teen, before becoming the first Brit to win 2 Winter Olympic golds.

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                        • are the NFL's concussion awards discriminatory?

                          https://www.mysuncoast.com/2020/08/2...gainst-blacks/

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                          • Wow. That article gives you something to think about. I would not want to be the one who stands up to defend the position of the NFL, or the doctor's opinions that they will rely on. Given the change of heart the NFL has had undergone recently with respect to kneeling, I hope they correct the apparently misguided approach to caring for their veteran players.

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