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  • #46
    Originally posted by booond View Post
    Cost of medical care has nothing to do with the subject.

    This is about the health of football players. What tests should be done are the tests which best determine whether a player is healthy enough to go back into the game. It may be what they are doing now but it looked from my chair like Hoyer was having a problem after that sack at the end of the third quarter. He went back into the game for two more series, the third series after they were down by 27-6 and there was 11 minutes left in the game. If an independent 3rd party was controlling the player's health they may have decided to allow him to play or they may have pulled him from the game but there wouldn't be a conflict of interest.
    I assure you, at the major college or pro level, they are doing what is considered current standard of care testing. I know most of the major sports teams sports docs and they get more training now on concussions than most of them care to know about. In addition, there are now neurologists on the sideline for the pro teams, for certain, and for most of the major colleges. I just don't know what you're expecting them to do beyond that based on a diagnosis being made via the television.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by bambam1729 View Post
      I assure you, at the major college or pro level, they are doing what is considered current standard of care testing. I know most of the major sports teams sports docs and they get more training now on concussions than most of them care to know about. In addition, there are now neurologists on the sideline for the pro teams, for certain, and for most of the major colleges. I just don't know what you're expecting them to do beyond that based on a diagnosis being made via the television.
      BTW, and an important point for Hoyer's sake, he'd had a concussion four weeks earlier with memory loss. Here's a quote from an article about that game:

      "Hoyer stayed in the game for 14 more plays before being removed for Yates, but he wasn’t right.

      “He wasn’t functioning correctly,” O’Brien said, “as to how we know he’d usually function calling a play, receiving a play and trying to communicate it to the offense.

      “George pointed it out to me when the series was over and I went over to him and [Hoyer] said, ‘I’m having trouble remembering the plays right now,’ so that’s where he was at.”

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      • #48
        Originally posted by cubehead View Post
        I was going to post that myself. Sad story and so much for the theory that rugby is safer.
        Safer than what? American football? That article didn't cite any stats comparing the frequency of concussions in the two sports. However, the most surprising thing to me in that article is that rugby is mandatory in the schools in the U.K. I can't imagine any sport being made mandatory in American schools.

        EDIT: I really feel for the mother, who thought about intervening when her son took the first big hit, but decided not to because she didn't want to embarrass him. She will probably go to her grave second-guessing herself.
        Last edited by jazzcyclist; 12-15-2015, 03:45 PM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
          I can't imagine any sport being made mandatory in American schools.
          Dodgeball - in 7th grade PE classes! :-)

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Atticus View Post
            Dodgeball - in 7th grade PE classes! :-)
            That was then. This is now:

            http://priceonomics.com/how-dodgebal...monized-sport/

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            • #51
              Originally posted by tandfman View Post
              The funniest thing I ever saw was a dodgeball game between a girls 7th grade PE class and the boys varsity football team. The boys got killed because they were so conflicted. The boys tried to get the girls out but couldn't bear to throw hard. Meanwhile the girls were ruthless in their annihilation of the boys - going for head-shots from 3 feet away on the center-line, as the boys tried to defend themselves.
              We still play it here - no PCness for us. :-)

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              • #52
                Gee, freestyle skiers get concussions too. And they even hire law dudes. Whodda thunk it?


                http://www.insidethegames.biz/articl...er-concussions

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                • #53
                  Believe it or not, the first-ever game of basketball could have resulted in concussions. Here's a description by James Naismith, who is generally credited with having invented the game.

                  >>“the boys began tackling, kicking and punching in the clinches,” Naismith said. “They ended up in a free-for-all in the middle of the gym floor.”

                  The injury toll: several black eyes, one separated shoulder and one player knocked unconscious. “It certainly was murder,”<<

                  http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/16/sp...ken-words.html

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                  • #54
                    This reminds me of how far football has involved since its beginnings, before Teddy Roosevelt pushed for rule changes to take the barbarism out of it. Ironically, the two football schools that were the most brutal during this era were Harvard and Yale, whose most infamous battle was the Hampden Park Blood Bath of 1894.

                    The college game drew tens of thousands of spectators and rivaled professional baseball in fan appeal, but football in the early 1900s was lethally brutal. Football was a grinding, bruising sport in which the forward pass was illegal and brute strength was required to move the ball. Players locked arms in mass formations and used their helmetless heads as battering rams. Gang tackles routinely buried ball carriers underneath a ton and a half of tangled humanity.

                    With little protective equipment, players sustained gruesome injuries—wrenched spinal cords, crushed skulls and broken ribs that pierced their hearts. The Chicago Tribune reported that in 1904 alone, there were 18 football deaths and 159 serious injuries, mostly among prep school players. Obituaries of young pigskin players ran on a nearly weekly basis during the football season. The carnage appalled America. Newspaper editorials called on colleges and high schools to banish football outright. “The once athletic sport has degenerated into a contest that for brutality is little better than the gladiatorial combats in the arena in ancient Rome,” opined the Beaumont Express.
                    http://www.history.com/news/how-tedd...saved-football

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                    • #55
                      It turns out that all of this attention recently given to concussions has been seen as a business opportunity for some doctors, not all of them appropriately qualified, and even by some individuals with no medical degree at all.

                      http://www.statnews.com/2015/12/16/c...-big-business/
                      Last edited by tandfman; 12-18-2015, 06:05 PM.

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                      • #56
                        I was talking with several coaches here, and we were reminiscing about the good ol' days when we got concussed in sports and kept on playing. No drain bamage there! :-)

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                        • #57
                          Ignorance is bliss.

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                          • #58
                            No wonder I'm happy all the time! The things I'm ignorant about outnumber the things I know something about a gazillion to 1.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by tandfman View Post
                              It turns out that all of this attention recently given to concussions has been seen as a business opportunity for some doctors, not all of them appropriately qualified, and even by some individuals with no medical degree at all.

                              http://www.statnews.com/2015/12/16/c...-big-business/
                              And those at the most risk get in on the act, too.

                              http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/08/russ...s-a-concussion

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                              • #60
                                Bioethicists say tackle football should not be played in public schools.

                                https://sports.vice.com/en_us/articl...out-of-schools

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