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  • Bob Hayes

    Just got elected to the NFL Hall of Fame. Long overdue. He changed the game from man-to-man to zone defenses because of his speed.

  • #2
    Sorry, didn't see this on current events first

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    • #3
      Bob Hayes has no bigger fan than myself. He's the reason I got into track. Imagine watching that Olympic 4x1 as it happened back in 64. It was... :cry: ...then..go Bob..go go..yes..YES!!!!!! Still one of the most amazing displays of speed ever witnessed. Absolutely incredible! I was hooked after that.

      However...

      When it comes to football Bob Hayes was not the first world class sprinter to play wide receiver. That was Bob Boyd a 9.5 guy (some might argue Don Hutson) out of Loyola who played for the Rams in the 50's. He was an NCAA champ and his 9.5 was as superior to the competition as Bullet Bob's 9.1 was vs his competition. Keep in mind by the mid 60's there were guys in the NFL who could run a 9.4. Something Boyd never faced. Boyd would gain a 1000 in a season and was a great deep threat. Surprised it wasn't him instead of Hayes who got defensive cordinators thinking "zone defense" because nobody could run with Bob Boyd.

      While Hayes was playing there was also Homer Jones a 9.3 guy out of Texas Southern who once beat Hayes in a 200 and is credited with the being the father of the spike.
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~

      Thrilled to see Hayes "finally" get the respect he deserves. If you look at his stats vs Lynn Swann, it's all Bullet Bob.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Texas
        That was Bob Boyd a 9.5 guy (some might argue Don Hutson) out of Loyola who played for the Rams in the 50's. He was an NCAA champ and his 9.5 was as superior to the competition as Bullet Bob's 9.1 was vs his competition. Keep in mind by the mid 60's there were guys in the NFL who could run a 9.4. Something Boyd never faced. Boyd would gain a 1000 in a season and was a great deep threat. Surprised it wasn't him instead of Hayes who got defensive cordinators thinking "zone defense" because nobody could run with Bob Boyd.
        Boyd had only one 1000-yard season, and with that exception, was never the constant threat Hayes was.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dj
          Originally posted by Texas
          That was Bob Boyd a 9.5 guy (some might argue Don Hutson) out of Loyola who played for the Rams in the 50's. He was an NCAA champ and his 9.5 was as superior to the competition as Bullet Bob's 9.1 was vs his competition. Keep in mind by the mid 60's there were guys in the NFL who could run a 9.4. Something Boyd never faced. Boyd would gain a 1000 in a season and was a great deep threat. Surprised it wasn't him instead of Hayes who got defensive cordinators thinking "zone defense" because nobody could run with Bob Boyd.
          Boyd had only one 1000-yard season, and with that exception, was never the constant threat Hayes was.
          Well aware of that fact. It's just that we are always lead to believe that Bob Hayes was the first track guy to make an impact as a wide receiver. That's not true. Don't get me wrong there is noway I ever discredit/criticize/disrespect Bob Hayes. If I can have a hero....

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          • #6
            why is it that I recall Lance Alworth as the one of the first "speed" receivers?
            ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by paulthefan
              why is it that I recall Lance Alworth as the one of the first "speed" receivers?
              Alworth was actually a running back while at Arkansas. Like Hayes he became a pro receiver. He did however come long after Boyd.

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              • #8
                Claude "Buddy" Young , US champion over 100m in 1944, was competing in the AAFC 3 years before Bobby Boyd appeared in the NFL. Curiously, both men ended up with 28 TDs in Pro Football

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rhymans
                  Claude "Buddy" Young , US champion over 100m in 1944, was competing in the AAFC 3 years before Bobby Boyd appeared in the NFL. Curiously, both men ended up with 28 TDs in Pro Football
                  Buddy Young (Illionis) was a running back as was Ollie Matson (U of San Francisco) the two real speed pioneers in the NFL. Young being only 5-5 170 pounds.

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