Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Does anyone know anything about cricket?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Does anyone know anything about cricket?

    While down under, I decided to watch some cricket on the tube. Ended up having no clue about the sport. Anyone here able to explain the game?

  • #2
    Lord knows who originally wrote this, but here's all you need to know...

    "You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

    "When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game."

    Comment


    • #3
      That's the clearest explanation of cricket that I've ever read. It seems to be very similar to CalvinBall...

      Comment


      • #4
        So now I know that GM is actually Dr. Irwin Corey. Brilliant!

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you GM. That really clears it up. You forgot about the tea breaks.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm (half) English and have played and have watched games and I still have no clue about it. Which may explain why we keep getting beat by Australia.

            It's actually a mystical rainmaking ritual of uncertain ancestry and age and "tea" is really a magic potion sent by Chinese wizards designed to enhance the "players" ability to bring forth rain ...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gm
              Lord knows who originally wrote this, but here's all you need to know...

              "You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

              "When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game."
              Love it.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

              Comment


              • #8
                But, but, but.... what do they actually do when they are in... or out? Does this mean there is a mixture of players from opposing teams in and out at the same time? Are there teams or is it everyman for himself? Do they play certain defensive positions or rotate as someone goes in .. or out.?
                I was googling Australia for running tracks and kept noticing numerous sorta oval/circular greenswards of various sizes with a strip near the center of the oval. Some had sizeable stands/spectator facilites, some were just there. I deduced they must be cricket grounds/pitches/fields/whatever they are called.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lonewolf
                  I was googling Australia for running tracks
                  If you haven't found it already, check out http://www.worldstadiums.com. A great site.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by KevinM
                    Originally posted by lonewolf
                    I was googling Australia for running tracks
                    If you haven't found it already, check out http://www.worldstadiums.com. A great site.
                    Fabulous site, KevinM, thank you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Does anyone know anything about cricket?

                      Originally posted by Jack Slocombe
                      While down under, I decided to watch some cricket on the tube. Ended up having no clue about the sport. Anyone here able to explain the game?
                      http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=cricket+rules

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lonewolf
                        But, but, but.... what do they actually do when they are in... or out? Does this mean there is a mixture of players from opposing teams in and out at the same time? Are there teams or is it everyman for himself? Do they play certain defensive positions or rotate as someone goes in .. or out.?
                        I was googling Australia for running tracks and kept noticing numerous sorta oval/circular greenswards of various sizes with a strip near the center of the oval. Some had sizeable stands/spectator facilites, some were just there. I deduced they must be cricket grounds/pitches/fields/whatever they are called.
                        Aren't those Aussie Rules Football Stadia? That's the sport that Ron Clarke attributed his early fitness to. His brother Jack apparently was a legend in this sport, and Ron said he tried to follow in his brother's footsteps. But, according to Ron, he wasn't very good at the game, so just spent most of the time running around chasing the ball, and thus became very fit, and also aware that he didn't have a future in Aussie Rules Football.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rasb
                          Originally posted by lonewolf
                          But, but, but.... what do they actually do when they are in... or out? Does this mean there is a mixture of players from opposing teams in and out at the same time? Are there teams or is it everyman for himself? Do they play certain defensive positions or rotate as someone goes in .. or out.?
                          I was googling Australia for running tracks and kept noticing numerous sorta oval/circular greenswards of various sizes with a strip near the center of the oval. Some had sizeable stands/spectator facilites, some were just there. I deduced they must be cricket grounds/pitches/fields/whatever they are called.
                          Aren't those Aussie Rules Football Stadia? That's the sport that Ron Clarke attributed his early fitness to. His brother Jack apparently was a legend in this sport, and Ron said he tried to follow in his brother's footsteps. But, according to Ron, he wasn't very good at the game, so just spent most of the time running around chasing the ball, and thus became very fit, and also aware that he didn't have a future in Aussie Rules Football.
                          I dunno. They don't have any yard markings or dileneation of playing area.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rasb
                            Aren't those Aussie Rules Football Stadia? That's the sport that Ron Clarke attributed his early fitness to. His brother Jack apparently was a legend in this sport, and Ron said he tried to follow in his brother's footsteps. But, according to Ron, he wasn't very good at the game, so just spent most of the time running around chasing the ball, and thus became very fit, and also aware that he didn't have a future in Aussie Rules Football.
                            Where Australian Rules is played (and that's not everywhere), the oval usually does double duty as a cricket ground (the pitch is the bit in the centre) because cricket is a summer sport and Rules is played in winter.

                            The Melbourne Cricket Ground where the 2006 CG was held fulfills both roles - after the football season has finished churning up the grass in the middle, they just drop in huge trays of grass for the cricket.

                            As to the original query, cricket has two sides of 11 players. One side is all out on the field at the same time and the other side has two batsmen in at a time.

                            The fielding team tries to get the batsmen out for the least amount of runs and when all batsmen are out, the teams swap activities and then repeat. The whole process can take a full five days at the elite level (Test cricket).

                            Runs are scored by running between the wickets (three vertical sticks at each end of the pitch) for one run each time, hitting to the boundary before a fielder can stop it, for 4 runs and hitting over the boundary on the full for 6 runs.

                            Whichever team gets the other all out twice for less runs, wins the game.

                            The bowlers bounce the ball off the grass pitch in an attempt to get the batsmen out by hitting the wicket at the other end of the pitch, if the batsmen hits the ball and it is caught on the full, that is also out. If a batsmen uses his body to prevent the ball hitting the wicket, then this is also out and finally, the fielding side can get a batsman out by hitting the wicket while the batsmen is out of his ground (on the wrong side of a white line drawn on the pitch) with while trying to hit the ball or attempting to score a run by running between the wickets. The bowlers deliver six consective deliveries, collectively called an over, and then the next bowler delivers from the opposite end of the field.

                            Each bowler specialises in one of the three main types of bowling; fast, medium or spin. Fast bowlers deliver at similar speeds to baseball pitchers (max 160km/h or 100mph), medium pace bowlers are slower but move the ball significantly throught the air and off the pitch and spin bowlers are slower still but create significant rotation of the ball so that it changes direction sharply when it bounces off the pitch.

                            All bowling styles must be delivered with a straight arm over the shoulder and have a run up prior to delivery which increases in length as the bowling speed increases. The bowlers can be used in any order by the captain depending on weather, the state of the pitch, weaknesses of particular batsmen, the time of day or capacity of the bowler.

                            The bowlers are allowed to bowl directly at the body of batsmen as a tactical measure and fast bowlers have a specialist delivery called a bouncer which hits the pitch much closer to the bowler and thus "bounces" up at a sharp angle towards the batsmen's head or upper body. Broken bones in the hand, ribs, elbow, concussion and broken jaws occur each year though not frequently. Depending on the state of the game, some batsmen continue despite the injury, a famous case being Rick McCosker

                            Batsmen also specialise to the extent that they take a regular position in the order of batting and generally 5 or 6 of the team are specialist batsmen with the remaining being specialist bowlers. Although all team members must bat and can bowl, there is another specialist called an all rounder who can bat and bowl with equal proficiency although slightly less well than a specialist. In rare cases an all rounder can match any specialist.

                            Hope this helps some.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A more complete description and some diagrams.
                              http://usa.cricinfo.com/link_to_data...F_CRICKET.html

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X