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  • Soccer Substitutions

    Does anyone out there know the time frames for allowing substitutions on the international level in soccer, for both real games and for friendlies?

  • #2
    Re: Soccer Substitutions

    Originally posted by KDFINE
    Does anyone out there know the time frames for allowing substitutions on the international level in soccer, for both real games and for friendlies?
    Time frames? You can sub at a throw-in or corner or goal kicks, or injuries, etc., whenever the ref says it's OK, up to the max # of subs allowed for that game (it differs).

    Comment


    • #3
      I think it's 3 players in the FIFA matches, as agreed by the parties for the friendlies. Before that, it was 2+a goalie. Prior to (I believe) the sixties, there were no substitutions allowed, even for an injured player. If a goalie got injured, a field player put on the goalies outfit and the game continued. There was also a lot less liberal added amount of time. 2-3 minutes would be a lot.
      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
      by Thomas Henry Huxley

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      • #4
        Is it purely an American bias or does it annoy people in the rest of the world how sloppily soccer (futbol) games are run? Nobody except the ref really knows when the game will end. On throw-ins the ref points to a specific spot on the sideline, places the ball, and then the player runs half-way down the field before releasing the it. Before penalty kicks players move the ball all over the place while the ref waves the defense back only to have them move closer as soon as his back is turned.

        Yeah, I know it is all no better than American football, where refs simply imagine where a ball really comes to rest underneath a mass of players and then make a big show of bringing chains out to measure precisely a placement that they have only guessed at to begin with. That annoys me, too.

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        • #5
          I guess there has been some misunderstanding as to my question. When I saw the 1966 World Cup final televised to the east coast of the USA, substitutes simply were not allowed. They players went the full 120 minutes. The next World Cup I saw on the tube was in 1998. By then, up to three substitutes were allowed, which is the current rule. In "friendlies" played today I believe that either 5 or 6 substitutes are allowed. How many were allowed in the past? When did international and "major" {e.g. Serie A, Budesleague, EPL etc.) league play go from zero to 3 substitutes, and the same question applies to "friendlies" which are exhibition games between national teams?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jhc68
            Is it purely an American bias or does it annoy people in the rest of the world how sloppily soccer (futbol) games are run? Nobody except the ref really knows when the game will end. On throw-ins the ref points to a specific spot on the sideline, places the ball, and then the player runs half-way down the field before releasing the it. Before penalty kicks players move the ball all over the place while the ref waves the defense back only to have them move closer as soon as his back is turned.
            It's you. :lol:

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            • #7
              Originally posted by KDFINE
              I guess there has been some misunderstanding as to my question. When I saw the 1966 World Cup final televised to the east coast of the USA, substitutes simply were not allowed. They players went the full 120 minutes. The next World Cup I saw on the tube was in 1998. By then, up to three substitutes were allowed, which is the current rule. In "friendlies" played today I believe that either 5 or 6 substitutes are allowed. How many were allowed in the past? When did international and "major" {e.g. Serie A, Budesleague, EPL etc.) league play go from zero to 3 substitutes, and the same question applies to "friendlies" which are exhibition games between national teams?
              I did not realise, they still had no substitutions in 1966, I do remember it from before the sixties. Are you sure? Not even for injured player? They must have adopted 2+goalie shortly after that. I have no idea when did it change to any three.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

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              • #8
                No subtitutions allowed at 1964 Olympics, but they were allowed (2/team/game) in 1968 so the rule came in in the interim - 1966 sounds about right.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pego
                  I did not realise, they still had no substitutions in 1966, I do remember it from before the sixties. Are you sure? Not even for injured player? They must have adopted 2+goalie shortly after that. I have no idea when did it change to any three.
                  it's true

                  archive footage shows one of the teams ( ?portugal ) hacking at Pele until he was just a hobbling wreck ( apparently refs didn't send anyone off in those days until they'd de-limbed an opponent ) - he had to be substituted but not allowed

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gm
                    Originally posted by jhc68
                    Is it purely an American bias or does it annoy people in the rest of the world how sloppily soccer (futbol) games are run? Nobody except the ref really knows when the game will end. On throw-ins the ref points to a specific spot on the sideline, places the ball, and then the player runs half-way down the field before releasing the it. Before penalty kicks players move the ball all over the place while the ref waves the defense back only to have them move closer as soon as his back is turned.
                    It's you. :lol:
                    Nah - you're right, gm. I can live with the fake injuries and the cheating throw-ins and all the other shenanigans, but the "I'll blow my whistle wherever the hell I feel like it to end the game" has GOTTA go. It's patently absurd in this day and age of .01 (or .001 :roll: ) timing.

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                    • #11
                      Is the extra time so random these days? i've seen games where the extra time that the ref has accounted for ends up as a count down clock when full time is up. So presumably there was access to his watch/notebook, or however he figures out how much time to add on?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No, there were absolutely no substitutes allowed in 1966. I guess I might have to resort to trying to try to call "Fox Football Fone-In" on Monday night when it is on the tube. (I've not succeeded in the past.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Subs were allowed in WC qualifying as early as 1954. English league in '66.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by KDFINE
                            No, there were absolutely no substitutes allowed in 1966. I guess I might have to resort to trying to try to call "Fox Football Fone-In" on Monday night when it is on the tube. (I've not succeeded in the past.)
                            I have no idea when the rules were changed. I watch Fone-In sometimes, post if you're going to try and call in!

                            btw - an integral part of the beauty of the beautiful game is the drama caused by the nail-biting, can't look at the TV, stand up avert your eyes and pray, anticipation of the final whistle. It's one of the highest drama's in the whole game and would be destroyed by having a clock counting down to the last 0.1 second. The way a match finishes is perfect for a game whose joy is largely based on anticipation and unanticipated drama...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marknhj
                              The way a match finishes is perfect for a game whose joy is largely based on anticipation and unanticipated drama...
                              I agree, but I have definitely seen a count down clock on a soccer game. i can't remember which one though. Possibly the MLS do it?

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