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  • #46
    It was obviously a mini-Big Bang from an infinitesimally small time-space singularity. After all, if it happened once, it can happen again. Fortunately it collapsed at .000000000000001 seconds, back into the Black Hole that had formed simultaneously , or we would have been all obliterated.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by bambam
      But it remains one of the most puzzling events in earth's history, primarily because it occurred in such an unpopulated, obscure area of the globe.
      Are there any known human deaths related to the event?

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Marlow
        It was obviously a mini-Big Bang from an infinitesimally small time-space singularity. After all, if it happened once, it can happen again. Fortunately it collapsed at .000000000000001 seconds, back into the Black Hole that had formed simultaneously , or we would have been all obliterated.
        i'd imagine the energy-fields of our universe prevents another big-bang happening in the same space

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        • #49
          Originally posted by eldrick
          i'd imagine the energy-fields of our universe prevents another big-bang happening in the same space
          There's always the possibility of a 'defect' in time-space that could rip open at any moment.

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          • #50
            in a void probably, but in an established exceptionally high-density material space with likely inhibiting energies like our universe/planet ( like an already pregnant woman doesn't get pregnant again during pregnancy no matter how hard you try ) the likelihood is probably several magnitudes lower than your quoted time number

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Daisy
              Originally posted by bambam
              But it remains one of the most puzzling events in earth's history, primarily because it occurred in such an unpopulated, obscure area of the globe.
              Are there any known human deaths related to the event?
              No, some animal remains were found. Siberian nomads several miles from the blast saw it and were interviewed in the 1920s.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Marlow
                It was obviously a mini-Big Bang from an infinitesimally small time-space singularity. After all, if it happened once, it can happen again. Fortunately it collapsed at .000000000000001 seconds, back into the Black Hole that had formed simultaneously , or we would have been all obliterated.
                One of the theories is that it was a black hole that passed rapidly thru earth's atmosphere. Hard to explain how it never came out the other side, however. If it didn't come out, it should have starting sucking the Earth into the singularity.

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                • #53
                  I think my discussing this like this probably eliminates me from consideration for the original topic of this post. Not that I was getting any votes anyway!

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                  • #54
                    2 Questions:

                    First ? is: Assuming the Big Bang theory of our present Creation is accurate ( I think it probably is), I have a larger question... how do we know there have not been a finite or infinite number of prior Big Bangs, followed by ultimate dissolution as is theorized for our current Universe's existence ?

                    2nd ? is: Do we know for sure that we know the outer limits of our current Universe. I know we beleive it is still expanding, but to repeat, do we know we have discoverd the outer perimeter, or in theory is it infinite in size ?

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by dukehjsteve
                      2 Questions:

                      First ? is: Assuming the Big Bang theory of our present Creation is accurate ( I think it probably is), I have a larger question... how do we know there have not been a finite or infinite number of prior Big Bangs, followed by ultimate dissolution as is theorized for our current Universe's existence ?

                      2nd ? is: Do we know for sure that we know the outer limits of our current Universe. I know we beleive it is still expanding, but to repeat, do we know we have discoverd the outer perimeter, or in theory is it infinite in size ?
                      regarding:
                      1) you are free to dream of any number of universes before and after ours, let your hair down and feel the groove. The present theory suggests that this is the last one based on measurements of speeds of expansion (cooling). Understanding is in flux and this could get revised. Knowledge of the "universe/matter/energy" before the bigbang seems not really open to scientific inquiry .

                      2) space is not well defined (exists) outside of matter and vice versa, we have no real grounds to discuss an "outer perimeter" of the universe as conventionally understood. Implied in this is the fact that you can never reach such a perimeter.
                      ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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                      • #56
                        dukester, paulie has given you some very good answers, but i'll embellish as i've been trying to get round to getting onto an evening college physics course for 30y without success, but i'm trying !

                        theories i've read

                        - no end to number of universe bang/contraction cycles & therefore we are somewhere in an infinite number along list

                        - however, doesn't rule out universes with not enough matter to cause a big "crunch" ( contraction ) - where we just fade away away into oblivion with all planets/galaxies spreading apart & everything returns to total darkness in an absolutely cold universe

                        - another bang starts in another part of the "void" way outside our universe - just quantum theory - remember we may just be a tiny big bang in an infinite void with infinite numbers of big bangs going on in other parts of the void

                        - void is the key

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by paulthefan
                          1) you are free to dream of any number of universes before and after ours, let your hair down and feel the groove. The present theory suggests that this is the last one based on measurements of speeds of expansion (cooling). Understanding is in flux and this could get revised. Knowledge of the "universe/matter/energy" before the bigbang seems not really open to scientific inquiry .
                          2) space is not well defined (exists) outside of matter and vice versa, we have no real grounds to discuss an "outer perimeter" of the universe as conventionally understood. Implied in this is the fact that you can never reach such a perimeter.
                          I'll go with

                          1) we live in the multiverse, which is an infinite number of universes all going BANG and CRUNCH on a 100,000,000,000 (plus or minus WTFK) year cycle.
                          2)Each universe exists in a finte field defined by the leading edge of Big Bang material/energy. Between each universe is Void, which is undefined in Space-Time parameters. Big Bangs occur whenever an imperfection 'develops' (don't ask, because you don't want to hear my version of its Cause (there - that's a hint)) in the Void (nothing is perfect, including . . . Nothing!)

                          This stuff has been going on . . . forever . . . and will continue . . . forever.

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                          • #58
                            There you guys go, thinking big again. Somethings we will never know. I have solved the dilema by refusing to think about it.

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                            • #59
                              Me, too. When people start talking about the origin of the universe, I tune out.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by tandfman
                                Me, too. When people start talking about the origin of the universe, I tune out.
                                Why? I'm sure you invest a great deal of gray matter with far more trivial 'unknowable' things, like "what actually goes on in a woman's brain?" The only thing more trivial than that would be trying to figure out if men think at all!

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