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  • #16
    Originally posted by eldrick
    do you ever change that syallabus ? isn't it about time for something like hamlet or king lear ?
    Yes, of course we do Hamlet, and Frankenstein, and Beowulf and Chaucer, and Milton, and Pope and Swift, and the whole canon, but HoD/AN is the culminating literary experience. From here we do a month of Philosophy and end with rock song lyrics (Sympathy For the Devil KILLS!). :twisted:

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Marlow
      Originally posted by eldrick
      do you ever change that syallabus ? isn't it about time for something like hamlet or king lear ?
      Yes, of course we do Hamlet, and Frankenstein, and Beowulf and Chaucer, and Milton, and Pope and Swift, and the whole canon, but HoD/AN is the culminating literary experience. From here we do a month of Philosophy and end with rock song lyrics (Sympathy For the Devil KILLS!). :twisted:
      Do you do other than English speakers? Just wondering. My kids had very little non-English literature instruction in High School. You can imagine, I cringed.
      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
      by Thomas Henry Huxley

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Marlow
        but HoD/AN is the culminating literary experience
        you woudn't last long teaching on the staff of a british public ( = private ) school with that as your crescendo :P

        we never heard of him at school - not rated as anyone worth studying in british schools

        shakespeare, shakespeare & more shakespeare with a possibility of george orwell or william golding as a brief diversion from the newly "hip" teacher, but he was soon told to go back to dickens by the senior master

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        • #19
          Originally posted by eldrick
          a possibility of george orwell or william golding as a brief diversion from the newly "hip" teacher, but he was soon told to go back to dickens by the senior master
          I do two Orwell essays - Politics and the English Language, plus Shooting an Elephant.
          As for 'non-English' lit, I'm sure you must know that Heart of Darkness was written by a Polish gentleman named Józef Korzeniowski. Senior year is nominally Brit Lit, but I do sneak in some Kafka and Sartre and Kant and other subversives! :wink:

          Golding's LotF is taught in the 10th grade. Catcher in the Rye in the 9th grade. When I'm feeling really feisty I teach William Ginsberg's Howl. That one gets public school teachers fired every year.

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          • #20
            not lord of the flies ( that was a junior school book ) for golding

            the inheritors

            & a mighty complex work it was to !

            & no, we didn't read "foreign" authors - i'm afraid they are not "rated" by british educators ( or weren't in the past ) - thinking was, when you have shakespeare & dickens, anything else is 2nd best

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            • #21
              Originally posted by eldrick
              when you have shakespeare & dickens, anything else is 2nd best
              Dickens is rarely taught over here any more. Great Expectations, his most 'didactic' book, fell out of the canon in the 60s, never to return. He's mostly seen as a pot-boiler, which is ironic, because he started out as just a pop-culture figure, beneath the dignity of the British public (private) school system.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by SQUACKEE
                I plan someday to watch all 3 Lord of the Rings back to back to back. Over 10 hours. Thats a lot of popcorn and beer my friend.

                LOL!

                I just borrowed the three disks from a friend last weekend to do the same thing!

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                • #23
                  Re: 10 movies ...

                  Originally posted by "Texas
                  Warriors
                  Ho! I commend you, my friend!

                  I usually get grief for my liking (owning the disk, actually) what has been labeled one of the prime "cult" movies of the past few decades.

                  All criticism usually stops when I show them the awesome work of Michael Beck...

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Marlow
                    Golding's LotF is taught in the 10th grade. Catcher in the Rye in the 9th grade. When I'm feeling really feisty I teach William Ginsberg's Howl. That one gets public school teachers fired every year.
                    For current TOEs this may be of interest but the Current A-level (16-18 y/o qualification) set texts are:

                    Poetry (1800-1945) is selections from William Wordsworth, Christina Rossetti, Wilfred Owen and Robert Frost.
                    Prose (1800-1945) is Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, The Age of Innocence, The Great Gatsby and A Handful of Dust.
                    Shakespeare: Henry IV pt I, Twelfth Night, Othello and The Winter's Tale
                    Drama and Poetry pre-1800: Dr Faustus, the Duchess of Malfi, School for Scandal and Aphra Behn's The Rover
                    Poetry pre-1800: The Pardoner's Tale, Paradise Lost Book 1, Donne's Selected Poems and The Rape of the Lock

                    From my own vague memories LotF and Beowulf was done 11-14, at 14-16 Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and Hamlet, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye. On the Road, Cider With Rosie, WWI poetry, Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm. But the curriculum changes every 4 years or so.

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                    • #25
                      Dang! I don't know how I have coped since my education predates practically everything mentioned here, except possibly Shakespeare

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Marlow


                        Golding's LotF is taught in the 10th grade. Catcher in the Rye in the 9th grade. When I'm feeling really feisty I teach William Ginsberg's Howl. That one gets public school teachers fired every year.
                        Allen Ginsberg wrote Howl. You can get fired for teaching that poem?

                        My kids in highs school read Camus, Dostoyevsky, Stephen Crane, Stevenson, Arthur Miller, Chekov, Hemingway and Shakespeare.

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                        • #27
                          Re: 10 movies ...

                          Originally posted by Brian
                          Originally posted by "Texas
                          Warriors
                          Ho! I commend you, my friend!

                          I usually get grief for my liking (owning the disk, actually) what has been labeled one of the prime "cult" movies of the past few decades.

                          All criticism usually stops when I show them the awesome work of Michael Beck...
                          [/quote]

                          Any movie with...

                          War-yarrrrrsss come out and pla-aaaaa.

                          ...is a keeper :lol:

                          Like I've mentioned before. Hollywood needs to bring Michael Moorcock's "Elric" to the silver scream. The saga of the albino prince and his vampiric runesword the mighty...Stormbringer..tailor made for the big screen. The world than Elric roams is every bit as wonderous as that of the Burroughs, Howard and Tolkien's stories.

                          paste...

                          The story of Elric, the last emperor of Melniboné, ruler of the dreaming city and keeper of the ruby throne, brings together many images of life and death, fate versus free will, generations of tradition and the destruction of that tradition, thought versus action, evil versus good , law versus chaos, and the difficulties faced when trying to reconcile and make meaning out of one's own existence. It is also a vehicle for Michael Moorcock to expound on yet another incarnation of "The Eternal Champion", a theme that runs throughout many of his fantasy novels. On this page I hope to give a brief overview and opinion of this tragic, yet action packed series. It is certainly one of the best offerings from Michael Moorcock, and changed my views on good fantasy forever. Having discovered the Elric Saga back in 1980 it introduced me to the new idea of an anti-hero and showed me that everything does not have to turn out "OK" in every book that I read. Truly an ambitious break from the fantasy genera of his day I have enjoyed Mr. Moorcock's vision and stunning tales for many years.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Per Andersen
                            Allen Ginsberg wrote Howl. You can get fired for teaching that poem?My kids in highs school read Camus, Dostoyevsky, Stephen Crane, Stevenson, Arthur Miller, Chekov, Hemingway and Shakespeare.
                            D'oh! It's Allen indeed!
                            No on Camus (Sartre instead), Dost and Crane in years gone by. Miller, yes, Hemingway (and Faulkner) yes. Norman Mailer yes. Poetry is mostly Dickinson, Whitman, Wallace Stevens (my fave), cummings, TS Eliot and Frost.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by lonewolf
                              Dang! I don't know how I have coped since my education predates practically everything mentioned here, except possibly Shakespeare

                              Ah, don't feel too bad. I'm still trying to figure out the plot for that Dick and Jane and Baby Sally thing...

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