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how the failing newspaper industry shot itself in the foot..

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  • #31
    Originally posted by tandfman
    I think the point of the Times article, and the fears expressed by some, is that because of the economics of the business, there may soon come a time when there won't be any free creditable news sources left.
    Sounds fair to me.

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    • #32
      Sounds terrible to me. I probably should have added that I agree with Marlow that this is not likely to happen any time soon.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by tandfman
        I think the point of the Times article, and the fears expressed by some, is that because of the economics of the business, there may soon come a time when there won't be any free creditable news sources left.
        It's hard to imagine CNN and Fox News going PPV any time soon.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by tandfman
          Sounds terrible to me.
          Terrible? Why? The alternative is a news organization run by private individuals.

          BBC might appear free but everyone has to buy a TV license. If the advertising revenue dries up what other options are there for "free" press (both financially and editorially free)?

          As far as i can tell the idea of free news is pretty recent with the internet, where did the free news come from in the past?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by tandfman
            An interesting column on this in today's NY Times.

            http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/13/busin ... 3carr.html

            Faced with an ad market that no longer supplies enough revenue to meet costs, many newspapers are now considering putting up pay walls on their Web sites, long an anathema in Internet culture. Consumers used to roaming freely across the Web in search of news and opinion may soon find themselves being asked to register at news sites and, in some cases, to fork over a credit card number.
            I don't think that's a new concept.

            But now the timing of it may be more appropriate given their struggles.

            It was tried before back when you had to register at many newspaper websites and a few asked for money. Ironically(?), I'm pretty sure the NY Times was one of them.
            The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Daisy
              Originally posted by tandfman
              Sounds terrible to me.
              Terrible? Why? The alternative is a news organization run by private individuals.

              BBC might appear free but everyone has to buy a TV license. If the advertising revenue dries up what other options are there for "free" press (both financially and editorially free)?

              As far as i can tell the idea of free news is pretty recent with the internet, where did the free news come from in the past?
              Arent news organizations already private?

              At least in the U.S.

              However, I agree that news has never been free.
              The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

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              • #37
                Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                Aren't news organizations already private?
                Yes, that is true. i guess I was thinking of the Washington Times run by Moon. At what point does the filtering of news become too strong? Most newspapers do at least attempt to have some balance.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                  It was tried before back when you had to register at many newspaper websites and a few asked for money. Ironically(?), I'm pretty sure the NY Times was one of them.
                  The Wall Street Journal still does. A good deal of their web content requires a paid subscription to the site, even if you are a paid subscriber to the print edition.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Daisy
                    Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                    Aren't news organizations already private?
                    Yes, that is true. i guess I was thinking of the Washington Times run by Moon. At what point does the filtering of news become too strong? Most newspapers do at least attempt to have some balance.
                    I'm not sure although there are a few media outlets who come to mind as suspect. 8-)

                    I agree that in my experience most legitimate papers try to be balanced.

                    What's funny is that now it seems that most people expect media to be on one side or the other (politically, at least).
                    The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

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                    • #40
                      http://news.yahoo.com/comics/nonsequitu ... sh6aLV1isC
                      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                      by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                      • #41
                        Yet another reason to justify not reading newspapers.

                        http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/20/techn ... green.html

                        a move last week by Marriott International, the global hotel and resort chain, suggested that, in an increasingly carbon-conscious world, newspapers have another sort of sustainability to worry about.

                        The hotelier announced that it would no longer deliver newspapers automatically to the doors of its guests . . . .Based on preliminary data, the company projects that newspaper distribution will be reduced by about 50,000 papers daily or 13 million papers annually, thereby avoiding 10,350 tons of carbon emissions.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Pego
                          http://news.yahoo.com/comics/nonsequitur;_ylt=AnCYALK4rtMPL224kXsh6aLV1isC
                          Ever notice how often multiple comic strips seem to randomly pick the same subject on the same day?

                          http://comics.com/pearls_before_swine/2009-04-20/

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                          • #43
                            Is this going on elsewhere?
                            The Daily Oklahoman, only daily newspaper in OKC, with state wide distribution has in recent months downsized to near tabloid size, smaller font, dropped comics, more concise articles (not a bad idea IMO) and quietly reduced staff.
                            This paper is owned by the Gaylord family, probably the richest family you never heard of, who also own maximun number of TV and radio stations allowed by law, Opryland in Nashville, Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Gaylordia CC in OKC and control the OKC Thunder NBA team. The paper editorally reports that is is profitable, possibly because it has taken such measures.
                            A possibly related indication of reduced advertising revenue is that the AMC 24 screen theatre, located in a modern upscale mall, has recently stopped advertising in the paper. It is kind of a nuisance to have to look up movies and show times on the internet.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by bad hammy
                              Originally posted by Pego
                              http://news.yahoo.com/comics/nonsequitur;_ylt=AnCYALK4rtMPL224kXsh6aLV1isC
                              Ever notice how often multiple comic strips seem to randomly pick the same subject on the same day?

                              http://comics.com/pearls_before_swine/2009-04-20/
                              Comic strip artists have been known to communicate with each other.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                It seems that newspapers are not the only medium in trouble these days.

                                http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/21/busin ... twork.html

                                Oprah Winfrey is fleeing broadcast television for cable. NBC, once arguably the biggest cultural tastemaker in the United States, is being shopped to Comcast, the country’s largest cable company.

                                Have we finally reached a tipping point that suggests a remarkable decline in the fortunes of broadcast television in America?

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