Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Birth of a Cycling Colossus - Taylor Phinney

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Birth of a Cycling Colossus - Taylor Phinney

    at an incredible 18y of age, he has just won the 4km pursuit barely a few tenths off the "true" WR of non-competing double OG champ, bradley wiggins

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Phinney

    he also did the unheard double of winning silver behind a german's new WR in the 1k, barely 1s behind ( & less than 1s behind non-competing double OG champ, chris hoy's ole WR )

    you are not supposed to be able to double up in these events at globals - they are too difficult

    this guy will become the greatest track cyclist the world has ever seen

  • #2
    http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/27032009/ ... ecord.html

    American Taylor Phinney was second in 1.01.611...

    Hoy won the first of his four Olympic golds in the time-trial in Athens in one minute 00.711 seconds...

    In just his third attempt at the distance on the track, Phinney, the men's individual pursuit champion, won his second medal of the championships.

    The 18-year-old son of 1984 Olympic gold-medallist Connie Carpenter-Phinney and two-time Tour de France stage winner Davis Phinney is mentored by Lance Armstrong and is a phenomenal prospect on the track and the road

    Comment


    • #3
      http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/26032009/ ... -king.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for posting this Eldrick. I didn't even know the worlds were taking place now. This event used to take place in the fall.

        Comment


        • #5
          he's going for the omnium gold in a few hours ( the 1 race he claims to have actually targeted ( hogwash statement as i found out he clocked 1'01/4'15 in copenhagen last month !!! ) )

          http://www.myp2p.eu/broadcast.php?match ... art=sports

          it's inconceivable he'll lose this with 1'01/4'15 ability

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Birth of a Cycling Colossus - Taylor Phinney

            Originally posted by eldrick
            this guy will become the greatest track cyclist the world has ever seen
            The problem is that unlike track and field, where dominant track runners can earn just as comfortable a living as dominant road runners, in cycling there's a huge disparity in money that you can earn on the road and track. My guess is that Phinney will try to follow the path of his father, and make his living winning bunch sprints on the roads of France in July. Even Marty Nothstein tried to trim down and make the transition to the road. Don't you think Chris Hoy is envious of Mark Cavendish and would love to trade places with him?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Birth of a Cycling Colossus - Taylor Phinney

              Originally posted by jazzcyclist
              Originally posted by eldrick
              this guy will become the greatest track cyclist the world has ever seen
              The problem is that unlike track and field, where dominant track runners can earn just as comfortable a living as dominant road runners, in cycling there's a huge disparity in money that you can earn on the road and track. My guess is that Phinney will try to follow the path of his father, and make his living winning bunch sprints on the roads of France in July. Even Marty Nothstein tried to trim down and make the transition to the road. Don't you think Chris Hoy is envious of Mark Cavendish and would love to trade places with him?
              The really sad part of this is that as a spectator sport, track cycling is an incredible thing to watch. If you've never seen a world-class team pursuit you've missed something in your sports-watching life. In person at least, road cycling is nothing to watch, wait all day, and they go by in about 7 seconds.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Birth of a Cycling Colossus - Taylor Phinney

                Originally posted by bambam
                The really sad part of this is that as a spectator sport, track cycling is an incredible thing to watch. If you've never seen a world-class team pursuit you've missed something in your sports-watching life. In person at least, road cycling is nothing to watch, wait all day, and they go by in about 7 seconds.
                I agree with you here. The first time I ever went to see a meet at a velodrome, I was immediately hooked on the sport and went out and bought a track bike soon after. The only other sport that hooked me like that was track and field which I was introduced to as a high school freshman. But track cycling has one major obstacle that prevents its popularity from growing outside of Europe, and that is the paucity of velodromes. There are less than two dozen in the entire U.S. Fortunately, I live in a town that has one of them, but it's the only one in the state. Compare that to the number of basketball courts (thousands), football fields (hundreds) soccer fields (hundreds), baseball and softball diamonds (thousands), tennis courts (hundreds), golf courses (many dozens) in Louisiana and you begin to get the picture. The closest one to you is in Atlanta. On the other hand, in France, velodromes are almost as plentiful as tracks, which should come a no surprise.

                As for road cycling as a spectator sport, I agree with you to a point. Flat road races are like marathons from a spectator's perspective, and the best way to watch them is on TV. I've actually been in a town in which a Tour de France flat/sprint stage was passing through on one occasion, and I didn't walk the two blocks from my hotel room to see it. But the tifosi never goes out in force to watch these stages. The fun is at the mountain stages. The only stages of the Tour de France that I've ever seen in person.are mountain stages, because that's when the cyclists come by one at a time over a period of 45 minutes to an hour with nothing but excruciating pain on their faces, and they're only moving at 10-12 m.p.h. In France, a professional road race is similar to a big-time college football in the South in that it's an all-day affair with the eating and drinking that goes on, and you see portable TV's all over the place as people follow the race's progress before it reaches them. And you also have the parade that comes through before the race in which gifts and trinkets are thrown out to the fans similar to Mardi Gras.

                Comment

                Working...
                X