Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bama hires 1st African-American coach in major sport

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bama hires 1st African-American coach in major sport

    http://www.rolltide.com/

  • #2
    :shock:

    Well I'll be a Birming Ham.

    If Bull Conner could see us now.
    The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry Harvey, guess T&f isn't a major sport!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler
        Sorry Harvey, guess T&f isn't a major sport!
        Now Bruce, how many people outside this board would say that T & F is a major sport at the college level? Shouldn't it at least make a cent in net revenue? Does even Oregon turn a profit in track and field?

        Edit: Even Grant says it:

        “Being the first African-American head coach in a major sport at Alabama is something that I don’t take lightly,” Grant said. “It is a tremendous honor.”

        http://www.govolsxtra.com/news/2009/mar ... t-alabama/

        Comment


        • #5
          Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.

          Comment


          • #6
            Did I miss where "major sport" is defined? Is it just men's basketball and football, or are baseball/women's bball also included? If it's the former, the majority of schools have likely not had a minority coach. If it's the latter, the numbers would be lower, but perhaps not as low as you might think.

            People who aren't familiar with collegiate sports might shake their head and consider this a "typical" Deep South thing, but the fact of the matter is that Bama may in fact be "progressive" this time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Texas
              Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
              I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Biden being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                Originally posted by Texas
                Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
                I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?
                Actually, Tennessee basketball hiring Wade Houston in '89 or '90 predates Evans by a few years.

                I think it is noteworthy. It is more noteworthy in football, where there are only 2 or 3 black head coaches. Ask the Black Coaches Assn if it is noteworthy when an AA is hired as head coach.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KevinM
                  Did I miss where "major sport" is defined? Is it just men's basketball and football, or are baseball/women's bball also included? If it's the former, the majority of schools have likely not had a minority coach. If it's the latter, the numbers would be lower, but perhaps not as low as you might think.
                  That's a good point, Kevin. I think most people look at top revenue producing sports as being major. Football and men's basketball. Also, those sports that are high profile, receiving a lot of media coverage and generating a lot of interest among fans. But many, if not most, of those programs do not turn a profit. Plus, there are other sports that produce some revenue: baseball, softball, soccer and track. Gymnastics makes money at UGA. Anyhow, I think most would agree that the major sports are football and men's basketball.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BillVol
                    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                    Originally posted by Texas
                    Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
                    I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Biden being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?
                    Actually, Tennessee basketball hiring Wade Houston in '89 or '90 predates Evans by a few years.

                    I think it is noteworthy. It is more noteworthy in football, where there are only 2 or 3 black head coaches. Ask the Black Coaches Assn if it is noteworthy when an AA is hired as head coach.
                    I only brought up Rob Evans because it was generally acknowledged, at least among Blacks, that Mississippi was the most racist state in America during the Jim Crow era, and therefore had the most to overcome. In other words, if the flagship university of Mississippi is enlightened enough to hire a Black basketball coach, then of course the other 49 states are similarly enlightened. To my knowledge, no other state had anything like the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission, which was basically a state run intelligence organization that gathered information about people involved in the Civil Rights movement (home address, work address, car description and license plate) and passed it off to the KKK.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                      Originally posted by Texas
                      Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
                      I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?
                      Irrelevant?

                      To black people in Alabama too?

                      Don't know about that. Certain things have been sacred... like Ala head coaching jobs.

                      There are people in Alabama who dont yet realize that the Confederacy lost the war. :lol:

                      I mean when you lose a war, your flag comes down and the winner's goes up...no?

                      Obama's office is in DC, not Tupelo, MS or Birmingham. And although it's not unusual for some of these cities to elect black mayors, for example, its generally because of white flight which effects the voting base but the resistence is just beyond the border...in the county.

                      Obama's only been president for a month and if you come to Texas you'll see just how unpopular he is. And that disdain appears to goes beyond his policies.

                      If you dont live in the South, just know that its still (even with Obama's election) in a different place, literally and figuratively speaking.
                      The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KevinM
                        Did I miss where "major sport" is defined? Is it just men's basketball and football, or are baseball/women's bball also included? If it's the former, the majority of schools have likely not had a minority coach. If it's the latter, the numbers would be lower, but perhaps not as low as you might think.

                        People who aren't familiar with collegiate sports might shake their head and consider this a "typical" Deep South thing, but the fact of the matter is that Bama may in fact be "progressive" this time.
                        But then that little caveat or qualification is the story within the story...

                        No?
                        The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                          Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                          Originally posted by Texas
                          Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
                          I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Biden being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?
                          Irrelevant?

                          To black people in Alabama too?

                          Don't know about that. Certain things have been sacred... like Ala head coaching jobs.

                          There are people in Alabama who dont yet realize that the Confederacy lost the war. :lol:

                          I mean when you lose a war, your flag comes down and the winner's goes up...no?

                          Obama's office is in DC, not Tupelo, MS or Birmingham. And although it's not unusual for some of these cities to elect black mayors, for example, its generally because of white flight which effects the voting base but the resistence is just beyond the border...in the county.

                          Obama's only been president for a month and if you come to Texas you'll see just how unpopular he is. And that disdain appears to goes beyond his policies.

                          If you dont live in the South, just know that its still (even with Obama's election) in a different place, literally and figuratively speaking.
                          I do live in the South and I work with a lot of the knuckle-draggers about whom you speak. I live in the state in which the majority of the Whites (55%) voted for David Duke when he ran for governor. And in November, McCain won 80% of the White vote in my state (I'm not comparing McCain to Duke, Garry). So I have first-hand experience with all the stuff you're talking about. But having said all this, do you really believe that Alabama has a worse legacy than Mississippi when it comes to racism and Jim Crow? :?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                            Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                            Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                            Originally posted by Texas
                            Hard to believe there is still talk/concern over the first Afro American to do anything.
                            I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think Obama made all this "first" talk irrelevant for Black folks. In 2000, there was a lot of talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Jewish Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party. In 2008, there was no talk about Joe Lieberman being the first Irish-Catholic Vice-Presidential candidate of a major party because of John Kennedy. Furthermore, didn't Ole Miss' hiring of Rob Evans 16 years ago also make Grant's hiring irrelevant?
                            Irrelevant?

                            To black people in Alabama too?

                            Don't know about that. Certain things have been sacred... like Ala head coaching jobs.

                            There are people in Alabama who dont yet realize that the Confederacy lost the war. :lol:

                            I mean when you lose a war, your flag comes down and the winner's goes up...no?

                            Obama's office is in DC, not Tupelo, MS or Birmingham. And although it's not unusual for some of these cities to elect black mayors, for example, its generally because of white flight which effects the voting base but the resistence is just beyond the border...in the county.

                            Obama's only been president for a month and if you come to Texas you'll see just how unpopular he is. And that disdain appears to goes beyond his policies.

                            If you dont live in the South, just know that its still (even with Obama's election) in a different place, literally and figuratively speaking.
                            I do live in the South and I work with a lot of the knuckle-draggers about whom you speak. I live in the state in which the majority of the Whites (55%) voted for David Duke when he ran for governor. And in November, McCain won 80% of the White vote in my state (I'm not comparing McCain to Duke, Garry). So I have first-hand experience with all the stuff you're talking about. But having said all this, do you really believe that Alabama has a worse legacy than Mississippi when it comes to racism and Jim Crow? :?
                            No, I don't.

                            Personally I believe each exists separate and apart from the other and shouldn't be confused.

                            I mean, after all, 'states rights' are specific to the state; so their legacy deserves the same consideration.

                            Didnt really think we were discussing which was worse though.
                            The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                              No, I don't.

                              Personally I believe each exists separate and apart from the other and shouldn't be confused.

                              I mean, after all, 'states rights' are specific to the state; so their legacy deserves the same consideration.

                              Didnt really think we were discussing which was worse though.
                              I do get your point about national politics being different than southern politics. That's why I brought up Rob Evans, who is more relevant to the topic than Basrack Obama. I just assumed that any progress that Mississippi made in this area can be presumed in the other southern states.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X