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  • Doping Penalties Increasing?

    I am pretty sure that this statement overstates the likely outcome, but it would be pretty harsh if enacted (see Front Page story):

    ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Olympic champion race walker Athanasia Tsoumeleka was charged Monday with using an illegal performance-enhancing drug.

    Court officials said prosecutor Costas Simitzoglou charged Tsoumeleka with breaking Greece's doping laws after she tested positive in January for CERA, an advanced version of the blood-booster EPO.

    The offense carries a maximum two-year jail sentence."The offense carries a maximum two-year jail sentence."

  • #2
    Originally posted by 26mi235
    The offense carries a maximum two-year jail sentence
    Two years in prison for increasing your hematocrit! The mind boggles.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pego
      Originally posted by 26mi235
      The offense carries a maximum two-year jail sentence
      Two years in prison for increasing your hematocrit! The mind boggles.
      it's not for having increased hematocrit as you well know but for being a lying, fraudulant, thief
      i deserve extra credit

      Comment


      • #4
        The subject line is slightly misleading. Doping "penalties" as meted out by the alphabet-soup organizations aren't changing (and after the recent decision against WADA, one wonders how a 4-year ban would fare in court).

        This is a case where a country has decided to criminalize PED use. And some would say, so they should.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mump boy
          Originally posted by Pego
          Originally posted by 26mi235
          The offense carries a maximum two-year jail sentence
          Two years in prison for increasing your hematocrit! The mind boggles.
          it's not for having increased hematocrit as you well know but for being a lying, fraudulant, thief
          Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
          by Thomas Henry Huxley

          Comment


          • #6
            The law should, and apparently does, recognize that when an athletes takes PED's in order to improve his/her performance, whether it's by raising hematocrit levels or otherwise, that athlete is actually stealing medals, prize money, and other benefits from other athletes. mump boy is right--these people are, in a very real sense, lying, fraudulent thieves.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tandfman
              The law should, and apparently does, recognize that when an athletes takes PED's in order to improve his/her performance, whether it's by raising hematocrit levels or otherwise, that athlete is actually stealing medals, prize money, and other benefits from other athletes. mump boy is right--these people are, in a very real sense, lying, fraudulent thieves.
              Should someone that sleeps in pressurized tent be jailed? Should George Brett have been jailed for corking the bat instead of being simply called out? Argument ad absurdum - should an offensive lineman, who does not bath for a week and eats loads of onions and garlic before the game be jailed?

              I am not arguing that any of these things could not be considered illegal within the context of the game, but criminal action? I just saw the movie Goya's Ghosts. The principal character is jailed by the Inquisition for abhoring pork. A secret Jewish sympathizer, therefore an enemy of the faith, that sort of thing.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tandfman
                The law should, and apparently does, recognize that when an athletes takes PED's in order to improve his/her performance, whether it's by raising hematocrit levels or otherwise, that athlete is actually stealing medals, prize money, and other benefits from other athletes. mump boy is right--these people are, in a very real sense, lying, fraudulent thieves.
                Should Maradona have gone to jail for stealing (and later so admitting) a World Cup chance from England? Spitball pitchers in the Hall of Fame?

                At what point should the law involve itself in the internal policing of a bunch of silly games?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gh
                  Should Maradona have gone to jail for stealing (and later so admitting) a World Cup chance from England?
                  Of course, what am I missing here? 8-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pego
                    Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
                    Laws do that already.

                    That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

                    The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.
                    Regards,
                    toyracer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by toyracer
                      Originally posted by Pego
                      Originally posted by mump boy
                      Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
                      Laws do that already.

                      That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

                      The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.
                      Intent to murder might be just a tiny bit different from an attempt to raise ones hematocrit by 10%.
                      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                      by Thomas Henry Huxley

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pego
                        Originally posted by Pego
                        Originally posted by mump boy
                        Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
                        Laws do that already.

                        That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

                        The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.
                        Intent to murder might be just a tiny bit different from an attempt to raise ones hematocrit by 10%.
                        What does the degree of motive or intent have to do with it? You asked a straightforward question, I gave the straightforward answer. I'm sorry if it isn't the answer you were looking for but the fact does not change: the law does indeed penalize motive.
                        Regards,
                        toyracer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's a stupid idea.

                          Drug "Cheats" are Tarred and Feathered enough without having to waste my money putting them up for a couple of years - I don't know if you could call them a threat to society with a straight face.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            People should have a legal right to participate in sports without taking PED's or being at a disadvantage when competing against those who do. It is perfectly legitimate, IMHO, for the law to protect that right.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chris McCarthy
                              It's a stupid idea.

                              Drug "Cheats" are Tarred and Feathered enough without having to waste my money putting them up for a couple of years - I don't know if you could call them a threat to society with a straight face.
                              so a accountant who commits fraud should only be barred from accountancy for a couple of years and not face criminal prosecution :?
                              i deserve extra credit

                              Comment

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