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  • KDFINE
    replied
    Of course this bill doesn't apply to doping in professional sports in the USA as long as it doesn't involve international competitions. I'll let the lawyers give their opinions as to the validity of such a law, but I suspect that it wouldn't pass judicial muster. If it passes I guess MLB will have to stop calling "it', the World Series!

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    A bill that would criminalize doping in international competition has been introduced in the U.S. Congress. The proposed Rodchenkov Act (named for the Russian whistle blower) would also provide a private civil right of action for athletes who are deprived of medals and financial rewards by doping offenders.

    https://www.insidethegames.biz/artic...l-competitions

    I've no idea whether this has any chance of passage.

    Leave a comment:


  • eldrick
    replied
    Originally posted by Pego
    BTW, I abhor thyroid substitution to euthyroid individual
    the london professors allow us to give 25mcg o.d. & re-test in 2/12

    Leave a comment:


  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by eldrick
    good point pego

    however, you know that it is common practice to treat borderline/lower-end-of-normal-thyroid with thyroxine without overt hypothyroidism on tests ( in my experience, it depends entirely on degree of ambivalence of patient to their "tiredness" - some want drugs, some will wait 6/12 & eat some beetroot ! )

    conversely, no anaemic will be diagnosed without a blood test & being usually Fe-deficiency it'll be Fe-supplements or a PPI; something to stop the menorrhagia or insidious gut-blood loss

    none will get EPO without a normochromic, normocytic anaemia due to usual renal failure

    hypothroidism & anaemia aren't same animals...
    Of course, not. I am talking about criminal proceedings, not medicine. BTW, I abhor thyroid substitution to euthyroid individual, just like giving antibiotics to the world travelers :wink: .

    Leave a comment:


  • eldrick
    replied
    good point pego

    however, you know that it is common practice to treat borderline/lower-end-of-normal-thyroid with thyroxine without overt hypothyroidism on tests ( in my experience, it depends entirely on degree of ambivalence of patient to their "tiredness" - some want drugs, some will wait 6/12 & eat some beetroot ! )

    conversely, no anaemic will be diagnosed without a blood test & being usually Fe-deficiency it'll be Fe-supplements or a PPI; something to stop the menorrhagia or insidious gut-blood loss

    none will get EPO without a normochromic, normocytic anaemia due to usual renal failure

    hypothroidism & anaemia aren't same animals...

    Leave a comment:


  • Pego
    replied
    [quote=mump boy]
    Originally posted by "Chris McCarthy":1cyeh6he
    It's a stupid idea.

    Drug "Cheats" are Tarred and Feathered enough without having to waste my money putting them up for a couple of years - I don't know if you could call them a threat to society with a straight face.
    so a accountant who commits fraud should only be barred from accountancy for a couple of years and not face criminal prosecution :?[/quote:1cyeh6he]

    Accounting fraud is illegal in every jurisdiction around the world. EPO is a legal drug for certain forms of anemia (don't jump, of course she did not have anemia, but how hard is it to produce a witness or two, who would testify that "lately she has been pale and tired").
    A couple of years ago, there was a thread about Galen Rupp feeling tired and some physician treated it with a thyroid supplementation. The lab published was clearly euthyroid. So, should Galen be sent to prison, just because some physician deviated somewhat from the evidence based standards? How does that differ from the "treatment" of non-existent anemia?

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  • Atanvarno
    replied
    If these things go to court, I would like to think they have better evidence than a positive test alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • eldrick
    replied
    what about :

    - unreliable tests ( none are 100% foolproof )

    - inadvertent +ve ( baumann said someone spiked his toothpaste ( ok that was probably nonsense but your drink/food coud be spiked ) )

    - nandrolone fiasco last decade, with reports of meat-eating leading to nandrolone +ves ( are athletes going to have to convert to vegetarianism in order to compete ? )

    going to jail for doing nothing wrong on your part ???

    Leave a comment:


  • mump boy
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris McCarthy
    It's a stupid idea.

    Drug "Cheats" are Tarred and Feathered enough without having to waste my money putting them up for a couple of years - I don't know if you could call them a threat to society with a straight face.
    so a accountant who commits fraud should only be barred from accountancy for a couple of years and not face criminal prosecution :?

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    People should have a legal right to participate in sports without taking PED's or being at a disadvantage when competing against those who do. It is perfectly legitimate, IMHO, for the law to protect that right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris McCarthy
    replied
    It's a stupid idea.

    Drug "Cheats" are Tarred and Feathered enough without having to waste my money putting them up for a couple of years - I don't know if you could call them a threat to society with a straight face.

    Leave a comment:


  • toyracer
    replied
    Originally posted by Pego
    Originally posted by Pego
    Originally posted by mump boy
    Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
    Laws do that already.

    That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

    The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.
    Intent to murder might be just a tiny bit different from an attempt to raise ones hematocrit by 10%.
    What does the degree of motive or intent have to do with it? You asked a straightforward question, I gave the straightforward answer. I'm sorry if it isn't the answer you were looking for but the fact does not change: the law does indeed penalize motive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by toyracer
    Originally posted by Pego
    Originally posted by mump boy
    Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
    Laws do that already.

    That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

    The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.
    Intent to murder might be just a tiny bit different from an attempt to raise ones hematocrit by 10%.

    Leave a comment:


  • toyracer
    replied
    Originally posted by Pego
    Are you suggesting the law should penalize motives instead of effect?
    Laws do that already.

    That is why there is a charge for Manslaughter and one for Murder.

    The end result is the same: someone is dead. However, the charge, and therefore the penalty, is based on the motive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    Should Maradona have gone to jail for stealing (and later so admitting) a World Cup chance from England?
    Of course, what am I missing here? 8-)

    Leave a comment:

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