Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Doesn't Air France plane have a GPS thing?

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • El Toro
    replied
    An interesting technological proposition from 10 years ago. Link

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by gh
    if a plane goes down in mid-ocean, what does tracking do?
    Isn't the point that you know why it went down (or at least what was happening on the plane) rather than where it went down? Might be useful from a preventive perspective if there is a design flaw in the plane.
    Recording the conversation in the cockpit would also be helpful, but I guess the pilots would want assurances that the recordings would only be listened to in the event of a crash, since I can imagine the conversations that might take place when three guys are alone during a ten hour transatlantic flight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    if a plane goes down in mid-ocean, what does tracking do?
    Isn't the point that you know why it went down (or at least what was happening on the plane) rather than where it went down? Might be useful from a preventive perspective if there is a design flaw in the plane.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Why would they have to store the data after the plane landed? They must erase those black boxes now.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    and it's incredibly expensive.

    And at the risk of being bold and cruel, if a plane goes down in mid-ocean, what does tracking do? The reason planes "disappear" in the Bermuda Triangle is simple... it's water! (posted with the understanding that they actually found some Air France wreckage, as unusual as that may be for to a mid-ocean tank job)

    Leave a comment:


  • hammer forever
    replied
    so every single plane in the sky, every where, continuously, will be transmitting its data back to some ground station? And that data is stored, hours and hours of it? Sounds like a lot of data.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Prophetic last paragraph of article.

    "Despite the hurdles to wireless transmission, it may not be too far off. Aviation specialist Paul Czysz, a professor emeritus at St. Louis University, believes that all it would take to spur an official drive for a telemetry system would be the crash of a major jetliner over mid-ocean in which the black boxes were unrecoverable—"a Titanic event," as he calls it. "You're going to have to have something like this," Czysz says of a real-time data link, "just to make sure you know what happened."

    Well, it happened.

    Leave a comment:


  • El Toro
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Maybe this is a dumb question, if so, it won't be my first, but could the data being recorded in the "black box" be constantly transmitted to a shore station so it is not lost if the plane goes down?
    Well, as we say around here, "There's no such thing as a dumb question, just dumb people." :lol: :lol:

    You are right that it is obvious solution and apparently the space shuttle does this but it's not yet a standard for aviation. I had a look around and found this article for you (and me).

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Maybe this is a dumb question, if so, it won't be my first, but could the data being recorded in the "black box" be constantly transmitted to a shore station so it is not lost if the plane goes down?

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    A decent piece on over-water travel and staying in touch:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 02517.html

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    [quote=El Toro]
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by "El Toro":iu9dpe2p
    From the manual for the Dukane D100
    The beacon will withstand depths to 20,000 feet (6096 meters). It can be detected at a range of 2000 to 4000 yards (1800 to 3600 meters).
    This is ambiguously worded to say the least.
    No ambiguity at all. It will work under water to a certain depth and you have to have a detector within a certain range of the beacon in order to locate it. Just because you might expect the detection range to equal the depth function, doesn't make the spec ambiguous.[/quote:iu9dpe2p]Are you saying that the beacon can be detected through 1800 to 3600 meters of water? If that's the case, you would only be able to detect it in water that deep if you're directly over the beacon. Otherwise, the depth of detection would get shallower the further you are away from it.

    Leave a comment:


  • El Toro
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by El Toro
    From the manual for the Dukane D100
    The beacon will withstand depths to 20,000 feet (6096 meters). It can be detected at a range of 2000 to 4000 yards (1800 to 3600 meters).
    This is ambiguously worded to say the least.
    No ambiguity at all. It will work under water to a certain depth and you have to have a detector within a certain range of the beacon in order to locate it. Just because you might expect the detection range to equal the depth function, doesn't make the spec ambiguous.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by El Toro
    From the manual for the Dukane D100
    The beacon will withstand depths to 20,000 feet (6096 meters). It can be detected at a range of 2000 to 4000 yards (1800 to 3600 meters).
    This is ambiguously worded to say the least.

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Interesting. Can it be detected in depths of 6.096m from 3.600m out?

    An update: Some debris has been found

    Leave a comment:


  • El Toro
    replied
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    Originally posted by EPelle
    I believe they can, but only if one is underwater within a range of 15m or so of the black box... and it only sends out a signal for approximately 30 days.
    15M?!! :shock: Did you mean meters or miles? Why not just make 15 inches then your sure to find it! :P
    From the manual for the Dukane D100
    The beacon will withstand depths to 20,000 feet (6096 meters). It can be detected at a range of 2000 to 4000 yards (1800 to 3600 meters).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X