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  • #16
    Originally posted by Taliban
    I hate the title of this thread because it is so untrue.....Basketball...Baseball sometimes....Sprinting events on the track....The US is horrible it football so CR beating them is no shock.
    I think marlow was being intentionally ironic. :lol:

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    • #17
      One question I have from the game is, I thought the World Cup games had to be played on grass? That's why the Silverdome had a special grass field installed in 94 to be able to host a couple games. So, why are CR's home games allowed to be played on Artificial turf? It is quite different playing on that surface than grass. Could this be the factor for the bad USA play? As it seems everyone plays bad at CR. In the 2010 WC qualifiers CR is undefeated at home and a score differential of 19-1. :shock:

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Jnathletics
        So, why are CR's home games allowed to be played on Artificial turf?
        I don't know the answer but my quess would be that such rules only apply to the tournament itself, not the qualifying.

        Originally posted by Jnathletics
        Could this be the factor for the bad USA play?
        Definitely, especially since they lost the goals so early.

        I remember QPR and Luton went to astroturf for a few seasons. Does anyone remember how that effected their opponents play? i think the FA banned them due to increased injuries rather than unfair advantage to home team.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Daisy
          Originally posted by Jnathletics
          So, why are CR's home games allowed to be played on Artificial turf?
          I don't know the answer but my quess would be that such rules only apply to the tournament itself, not the qualifying.

          Originally posted by Jnathletics
          Could this be the factor for the bad USA play?
          Definitely, especially since they lost the goals so early.

          I remember QPR and Luton went to astroturf for a few seasons. Does anyone remember how that effected their opponents play? i think the FA banned them due to increased injuries rather than unfair advantage to home team.
          The ball bounces around all over the place on artificial turf. The home team gets used to it but it's usually a significant disadvantage for visiting teams. Plus, I do think they result in more injuries.

          I heard on FSN last night that Real Madrid are playing Toronto on their pre-season tour. Toronto are going to replace their artificial pitch with grass, for this one game, as Real Madrid refused to play on it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by marknhj
            Plus, I do think they result in more injuries.
            I'm not sure about that as a reason. Maybe at the elite level there might be an injury issue, but my experience with the newer A.T.'s have been positive. Of course I've never played on a fully manicored grass soccer pitch before, just the playground hard as rocks variety. :?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Daisy
              Originally posted by Taliban
              I hate the title of this thread because it is so untrue.....Basketball...Baseball sometimes....Sprinting events on the track....The US is horrible it football so CR beating them is no shock.
              I think marlow was being intentionally ironic. :lol:
              Oh ops:
              Afrikan

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Daisy
                I think marlow was being intentionally ironic. :lol:
                y'think?
                I'm a big rah-rah fan of USA athletics, but I get so tired of jingoistic fans . . . and especially radio-talk-show idiots who think we are Dog's Gift to the sporting world. The USA has one of the potentially best farm systems for soccer in the world, because every 5-year-kid in the nation is pushed into the sport. But we screw it up by making it a 'sport', as opposed to what it is everywhere else: fun. I seriously can't see a time in the next 50-100 years when the USA can be regularly competitive. Throwing money and bodies at soccer does not a world-beater make. It does in many other sports and that's why the USA is good at many other ones.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Marlow
                  Originally posted by Daisy
                  I think marlow was being intentionally ironic. :lol:
                  y'think?
                  I'm a big rah-rah fan of USA athletics, but I get so tired of jingoistic fans . . . and especially radio-talk-show idiots who think we are Dog's Gift to the sporting world. The USA has one of the potentially best farm systems for soccer in the world, because every 5-year-kid in the nation is pushed into the sport. But we screw it up by making it a 'sport', as opposed to what it is everywhere else: fun. I seriously can't see a time in the next 50-100 years when the USA can be regularly competitive. Throwing money and bodies at soccer does not a world-beater make. It does in many other sports and that's why the USA is good at many other ones.
                  I'm still learning personalities I thought you were the "other" type of fan. You know what will improve US sports...drop the arrogance and seek foreign help. Look at gymnastics.
                  Afrikan

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Taliban
                    drop the arrogance and seek foreign help. Look at gymnastics.
                    Bora, Bora, Bora! He tried and failed, and he was one of the best. No diss to marknhj (ha!), but Ami youth soccer thinks that English soccer coaches are the be-all, end-all and bring them over here in droves. What happens is that we get the left-overs from Limey footie and they really can't cope with what they are presented here. Of the dozen or so I've worked with, I considered 2 of them on a par with the top-tier Ami coaches I've worked with. The Brazilians and Argentines who come here, however, usually ARE the real deal. I (and my players) learned more in one year from a Bzl asst coach we brought in, than my other 30 years of coaching and playing.

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                    • #25
                      So what's the problem? For me I see to many drills and not enough actual 'kick around'.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Daisy
                        So what's the problem? For me I see to many drills and not enough actual 'kick around'.
                        Someone, somewhere in US Soccer once said, 'don't scrimmage - they won't learn the skills they need unless you DRILL them (which is semi-true, as in Coerver drills)', and everyone believed him. It took me about 10 years to get the courage up to contradict him and then my teams got much better. Having them scrimmage with certain 'emphases' (2-touch, no passing till you've beaten a man, 5 passes before a shot, etc.) is the BEST way to learn the game IMO.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Marlow
                          Originally posted by Taliban
                          drop the arrogance and seek foreign help. Look at gymnastics.
                          Bora, Bora, Bora! He tried and failed, and he was one of the best. No diss to marknhj (ha!), but Ami youth soccer thinks that English soccer coaches are the be-all, end-all and bring them over here in droves. What happens is that we get the left-overs from Limey footie and they really can't cope with what they are presented here. Of the dozen or so I've worked with, I considered 2 of them on a par with the top-tier Ami coaches I've worked with. The Brazilians and Argentines who come here, however, usually ARE the real deal. I (and my players) learned more in one year from a Bzl asst coach we brought in, than my other 30 years of coaching and playing.
                          I believe, in order to have a deep, quality program, you need both participation and somebody to emulate. In Europe and Latin America (other places, too) you have mass participation, but also weekend adult games to go to at every level of competition from the premier league to fifth, sixth or whatever number league in cities and villages. We have mass youth participation, but not the other component.
                          Baseball has it all in USA, it is well organized and, therefore, prospers.

                          My grandson is really good at both soccer and baseball. This year due to a scheduling conflict, he had to choose. It was baseball as a no-brainer.
                          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                          by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Marlow
                            Having them scrimmage with certain 'emphases' (2-touch, no passing till you've beaten a man, 5 passes before a shot, etc.) is the BEST way to learn the game IMO.
                            Sounds like you're on the right track. Still, playing just plain pick-up helps a lot, especially with regard to spatial awareness and the speed of the game. That's how most kids in the world get their football instinct.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Marlow
                              Originally posted by Taliban
                              drop the arrogance and seek foreign help. Look at gymnastics.
                              Bora, Bora, Bora! He tried and failed, and he was one of the best. No diss to marknhj (ha!), but Ami youth soccer thinks that English soccer coaches are the be-all, end-all and bring them over here in droves. What happens is that we get the left-overs from Limey footie and they really can't cope with what they are presented here. Of the dozen or so I've worked with, I considered 2 of them on a par with the top-tier Ami coaches I've worked with. The Brazilians and Argentines who come here, however, usually ARE the real deal. I (and my players) learned more in one year from a Bzl asst coach we brought in, than my other 30 years of coaching and playing.
                              That's amazing! My suggestion would have been to seek help from S. America. Isn't diversity great!
                              Afrikan

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Daisy
                                So what's the problem? For me I see to many drills and not enough actual 'kick around'.
                                This has been my pet peeve on US soccer for a long time. Too many coaches, too many orange cones, too many practice vests, too much politics -- and not enough letting kids play soccer, unsupervised, in the streets. In the streets is where you develop the creativity and toughness that gives you that slightest of edge that makes the difference in soccer. BUT where do you ever see American kids voluntarily playing soccer on their own. It just doesn't happen here in this country that often.

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