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Track vs. baseball and standards

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  • Track vs. baseball and standards

    This post came RHB's way via facebook. Not my post. And RHB cannot stand baseball and sees it as a bit faster day in the library. Or fast golf. The poster is well known and I guess went to a game where Manhy Wigs are sellling out with no concern that he is a bonafide cheat.

    I have a question? Why is the American public so concerned or world audiencee that mistakes are made by track athletes in this area, yet...we embrace this loser?

    What do you think the answer is?



    Manny Ramirez. Confirmed unremorseful cheat. A fraud and a scam no better than Bonds, yet Mannywood is hotter than ever. Sell out fans supporting a cheat, parents buying their kids manny wigs. Lesson to son: "Go ahead and cheat. Don't need to atone either..... everyone does it." What does this say...anything to get ahead. Got a smile and some so called charm? You're good to go. This sickens me.... a long time Dodger fan
    Wolfie Lives

  • #2
    The answer is simple: the "pro" sports (read, non-Olympic) have never gone out of their way to demonize their stars. They've kept it quiet, in the family, had minimal penalties and practiced spin control on behalf of their sport.

    The Olympic sports have done the complete opposite, and rather than be rewarded for truth, justice and the Greek way, they've created an image of being filled with criminals. And their answer to fixing this ghastly image problem is to become even more Draconian. Talk about a death spiral.....

    The average sports fan, at least when it comes to team games, has shown that he thinks all this is a tempest in a teapot and just part of the way the game is played.

    We have a brutal row to hoe here.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by gh
      The average sports fan . . ..
      Die-hard track fans are anything BUT 'Average Sports Fans'. (duh!), nor would we ever want to be. The ASFdoes little thinking of his own, instead he spouts off what he's heard some talking head say, so he can sound 'intelligent' (sic) to his cronies, as they sit on the couch quaffing their Bud Lights.
      They keep their heads safely tucked in the sand, so their Weltanschauung can't be disturbed.

      Is that the model we wish to emulate? :twisted:

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      • #4
        diehard track fans are such a small part of the spectrum they're basically irrelevant to the big picture. (unfortunately)

        It's the man in the street that keeps the sport alive.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gh
          diehard track fans are such a small part of the spectrum they're basically irrelevant to the big picture. (unfortunately)
          It's the man in the street that keeps the sport alive.
          Is their really such a thing as a casual track fan? (sincere question)
          Who tunes in to TV T&F that doesn't understand its nuances? Everyone dabbles with the major sports because the mainstream media keep the teams and individuals in their consciousness, but not T&F. So who tunes in unless he (mostly men) knows wassup?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Marlow
            Originally posted by gh
            diehard track fans are such a small part of the spectrum they're basically irrelevant to the big picture. (unfortunately)
            It's the man in the street that keeps the sport alive.
            Is their really such a thing as a casual track fan? (sincere question)
            Who tunes in to TV T&F that doesn't understand its nuances? Everyone dabbles with the major sports because the mainstream media keep the teams and individuals in their consciousness, but not T&F. So who tunes in unless he (mostly men) knows wassup?
            Uh... I'm pretty sure we see them every 4 years... hundreds of millions of them. Everyone watches the olympics.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Atheist
              Uh... I'm pretty sure we see them every 4 years... hundreds of millions of them. Everyone watches the olympics.
              No, those are 'spectacle' fans. I'm talking about what's on TV between the Olympics.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gh
                The answer is simple: the "pro" sports (read, non-Olympic) have never gone out of their way to demonize their stars. They've kept it quiet, in the family, had minimal penalties and practiced spin control on behalf of their sport.

                The Olympic sports have done the complete opposite, and rather than be rewarded for truth, justice and the Greek way, they've created an image of being filled with criminals. And their answer to fixing this ghastly image problem is to become even more Draconian. Talk about a death spiral.....
                Not to suck up to the powers that be around here, but this is pretty much the most salient point to be established about how T&F treats PEDs vs. big time sports in the US. We are killing our own sport with the way we deal with PEDs . . .

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                • #9
                  Yeah, the problem is track and field is permeated with too much integrity. That is the problem. Get real. I believe the much bigger issue is that most spectators find the sport boring. You're kidding yourselves if you believe that PEDs are the biggest issue. The people need bread and circuses, and I believe they'll take their circuses with performance-enhanced performers. Many people find soccer boring, and I don't believe they've been stigmatized with drug scandals, have they?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 2 cents
                    Many people find soccer boring, and I don't believe they've been stigmatized with drug scandals, have they?
                    No, the problem there is that soccer is just downright boring, PEDs or not . . .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 2 cents
                      Yeah, the problem is track and field is permeated with too much integrity. That is the problem. Get real. I believe the much bigger issue is that most spectators find the sport boring. You're kidding yourselves if you believe that PEDs are the biggest issue. The people need bread and circuses, and I believe they'll take their circuses with performance-enhanced performers. Many people find soccer boring, and I don't believe they've been stigmatized with drug scandals, have they?
                      Could you please re-state your main point --- I'm missing it here...
                      Is anyone suggesting that we ignore PED's? Or downplay their role in our sport, or sweep them under the rug? Or encourage our kids to win at all costs, and cheat if you can get away with it?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rasb
                        Originally posted by 2 cents
                        Yeah, the problem is track and field is permeated with too much integrity. That is the problem. Get real. I believe the much bigger issue is that most spectators find the sport boring. You're kidding yourselves if you believe that PEDs are the biggest issue. The people need bread and circuses, and I believe they'll take their circuses with performance-enhanced performers. Many people find soccer boring, and I don't believe they've been stigmatized with drug scandals, have they?
                        Could you please re-state your main point --- I'm missing it here...
                        Is anyone suggesting that we ignore PED's? Or downplay their role in our sport, or sweep them under the rug? Or encourage our kids to win at all costs, and cheat if you can get away with it?
                        I don't know, are they? Rasb, I assume you're capable of reading the other posts in this thread.

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                        • #13
                          Yes, I actually can read...
                          But only what is written ---- the in between the lines stuff needs a bit of deciphering, which is why I posed the query...
                          I fully agree there is a difference between the way our sport, and various other "Olympic" sports are trying to cope with the PED issue. Especially as compared to so-called professional, entertainment-based sports, and that certainly is a difficult "row to hoe". How many ways can we have it? I don't know the overall answer - I only know my stance...

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                          • #14
                            you don't hang jaywalkers, and the man in the street thinks of PED use as jaywalking..... sad, but true.

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                            • #15
                              Allow me to enter exhibit A: front page now reporting that putter Brent Noon to go into Georgia's Hall of Fame. Admittedly, his doping positive didn't come until after he left the school, but if the IAAF/USATF were in charge of this—not to mention this board's lynch mob—you think he'd even get a sniff?

                              Here's a bottom-line thing for y'all. All the "experts" who post here keep saying that the sport needs better marketing. Marketing means selling to a mass audience, not just a small group of aficionados. If the masses are willing to live and let live, maybe one shouldn't be doing stupid things that alienate them.

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