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Dr. Henry Louis Gates Arrested Entering His Own Home

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  • #16
    "HLG: I’ll be meeting with my legal team, and we will be deciding what kind of legal action I should take."

    Do all Harvard professors have "legal teams?" How much money does a professor make?

    I want my own legal team.

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    • #17
      Let me see if I can lay out what happened here.

      Professor Gates and his driver arrive home. As he stated. the front door wouldn't open so he went inside through another door to unlock it. Then, back outside he and his driver forced the jammed door open. In the process, a passerby saw the two men forcing the front door, and rightly called police, suspecting a break-in.

      Police respond, finding the two men in the house. Gates, not knowing the police have been CALLED to his home, immediately suspects random racial profiling. Already tired from a long trip, and probably annoyed from the front door problems, he immediately assumes an attitude and refuses to cooperate, escalating the issue, as the police don't know what might be going on behind that door. Finally, he comes out and provides ID, and as the officers leave the house to go to their cruisers to check his ID to the house, he follows them out, now really annoyed and belligerent. Finally, the police have had enough and arrest Mr. Gates.
      There are no strings on me

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      • #18
        When you have attitude, you need a legal team.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by guru
          Let me see if I can lay out what happened here.

          Professor Gates and his driver arrive home. As he stated. the front door wouldn't open so he went inside through another door to unlock it. Then, back outside he and his driver forced the jammed door open. In the process, a passerby saw the two men forcing the front door, and rightly called police, suspecting a break-in.

          Police respond, finding the two men in the house. Gates, not knowing the police have been CALLED to his home, immediately suspects random racial profiling. Already tired from a long trip, and probably annoyed from the front door problems, he immediately assumes an attitude and refuses to cooperate, escalating the issue, as the police don't know what might be going on behind that door. Finally, he comes out and provides ID, and as the officers leave the house to go to their cruisers to check his ID to the house, he follows them out, now really annoyed and belligerent. Finally, the police have had enough and arrest Mr. Gates.
          I think you nailed it guru, thats what i believe happened also. If the cops did something outwardly racist the professor would have mentioned it in detail, he didnt. The cop responded to a call, which the MUST do and if the professor was civil and showed his I.D. the whole thing would have been over- from what we have heard so far, thats what i believe is the thruth.

          I am not a cop lover, i have personally suffered from many of them being macho jerks.
          phsstt!

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          • #20
            Both parties made big mistakes in this case. Arresting a man at his own house because he has an attitude problem is a HUGE mistake, and it seems like the officer here did it mostly out of spite.

            Professor Gates was obviously already very stressed out and reacted in a way he normally wouldn't have. All of us have moments like that. Does anyone here (other than Dwight Love) really believe that Professor Gates would have been arrested had he remained calm and courteouse with this officer?

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            • #21
              I've heard the Boston coverage today, and I've yet to get an accurate explanation as to why Gates was arrested. I hope it wasn't because he was too loud? It couldn't have been for lack of cooperation. (For the record, there have been nine break-ins in his neighborhood in '09)

              If Gates expected an apology of some kind, he wasn't being realistic. That's not what police do.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Friar
                I've heard the Boston coverage today, and I've yet to get an accurate explanation as to why Gates was arrested. I hope it wasn't because he was too loud?

                Disorderly conduct.

                And as I said before - just because the police COULD arrest him I don't think they should have, once they were able to run his ID and confirm it was indeed his house.

                Sometimes putting up with unhappy customers is part of that line of work.
                There are no strings on me

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                • #23
                  Did he really keep repeating to the cop "Ya, I'll speak with your mama outside." ??

                  Sounds like the police responded to a call about a break in and this guy totally lost it and let a bunch of his own prejudices come to the surface. The cop probably ruffled some feathers because the guy was being an asshole about it.

                  Here's the news story I read

                  http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/ju ... st-harvard

                  Have I got it wrong?

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                  • #24
                    Just to reverse this, isn't there a whiff of Gates getting away with being abusive to a police officer because of his privileged social status and because he's mates with a bunch of law professors? Maybe Gates lost his temper because he felt his class, not his race, was being disrespected, then fell back on the easiest rhetoric available to him. Somehow he was tired and his pride got hurt and he kicked up a stinking fuss about nothing then reached for what crutches he could to support himself.

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                    • #25
                      There is probably a bit of blame all around, but the decision to drop charges implies that the cops did not have cause to arrest him.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by dakota
                        D....
                        Here's the news story I read

                        http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/ju ... st-harvard

                        Have I got it wrong?
                        Since it's an English newspaper not always renowned for non-sensationalizing, it's possible you might.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bad hammy
                          There is probably a bit of blame all around, but the decision to drop charges implies that the cops did not have cause to arrest him.

                          Well, if you're going down the interstate 5 miles over the speed limit you're not going to get pulled over when you drive by that cruiser. Give him the middle finger as you go by and that very well may change.
                          There are no strings on me

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by guru
                            Originally posted by bad hammy
                            There is probably a bit of blame all around, but the decision to drop charges implies that the cops did not have cause to arrest him.
                            Well, if you're going down the interstate 5 miles over the speed limit you're not going to get pulled over when you drive by that cruiser. Give him the middle finger as you go by and that very well may change.
                            In this case the folks back at the home office said no offense, no foul. In your example that would not happen - I'd still be paying for a speeding ticket.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by gh

                              Since it's an English newspaper not always renowned for non-sensationalizing, it's possible you might.
                              The Guardian isn't renowned for sensationalism. You must have it mixed up with The Sun or The Mirror or The Daily Mail or something.

                              It's an intriguing story though and one which witnesses would no doubt have told differently.

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                              • #30
                                DWB = driving while black

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