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The Hurt Locker

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  • The Hurt Locker

    Anybody else see it? I give it two thumbs up. A sobering, suspenseful, non-political movie.

  • #2
    Read a review of it in the local alternative paper that said it was one of the best American-made movies ever. Quite high praise.

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    • #3
      Not in very wide release yet. To see it this week, I'd have to travel 45 minutes across the city. I'll see at the local cineplex next week.

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      • #4
        I never really liked the director's Point Break though it had several memorable scenes and has a cult following.
        THL has done very well in the elite press. I had been pointing towards Matt Damon's Green Zone but will have to look for this film.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Friar
          I never really liked the director's Point Break though it had several memorable scenes and has a cult following.
          Check out her Near Dark. One of the best vampire flicks ever.

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          • #6
            I seldom know who directs a film or what they may have directed previously.
            I had never head of this director, Kathryn Bigelow, or any of the actors, until I read the review in this morning local paper. Even then, I was not familiar with any of their credits.
            I anybody else this clueless to such things? :?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lonewolf
              I seldom know who directs a film or what they may have directed previously.
              I had never head of this director, Kathryn Bigelow, or any of the actors, until I read the review in this morning local paper. Even then, I was not familiar with any of their credits.
              I anybody else this clueless to such things? :?
              Yes.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

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              • #8
                Saw Hurt Locker today. It's one of those films that’s difficult to watch, but very important nonetheless. The tension is so palpable, I actually had a stomach-ache for most of the movie. The story and the reality of it are so superb, that it seemed more like a documentary. Best of all, it makes the audience think about the situation we have made for ourselves over there. It's hard to recommend this since it's so depressing, but if you can handle it, do go see it. My wife didn't like watching it, but even she's glad she did see it!

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                • #9
                  I am pretty much in tune with Marlow except I did not find the movie depressing. Instead, whatever it reveals about my internal workings, I found it inspiring.
                  I have friends with kids and grandkids I have known all their lives in this one. One, a seemingly a clueless, rambunctious, nearly incorrigible teenager, gave up a D1 track scholarship on 9/12/01 to enlist. He just completed his 6th tour in Iraq / Afghanistan. With two Silver Stars and three Purple Hearts, the last of which sidlined him for a while, he has been kicked upstairs, against his wishes, to Special Forces instructor. His brother, who is in some sort of spook unit, is somewhere out there in the world on his fifth tour and only reports in to his mother by email once in a blue moon so she will know he is alive and well, assures her he is ten feet tall and bullet proof and futiley admonishes her not to worry until she hears differently.
                  Fortunately for all of us, there are young men like them and Sgt. James in the movie, who, for their own reasons, thrive on this stuff.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lonewolf
                    Fortunately for all of us, there are young men like them and Sgt. James in the movie, who, for their own reasons, thrive on this stuff.
                    Second lonewolf on this. Having spent 6 months of my residency at Fort Bragg and Womack Army Hospital and taking care a lot of these guys over the past 8 years, since many of their doctors have shipped out, and they get sent to us, despite what you see or hear in the media, most of these guys want to do this stuff - they do thrive on it. They are truly inspiring and almost all would take a bullet to save our freedoms. Inspiring.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lonewolf
                      Fortunately for all of us, there are young men like them and Sgt. James in the movie, who, for their own reasons, thrive on this stuff.
                      The problem is, Sgt. James preferred disarming bombs to being with his own wife and son. I don't blame the people, I blame the war. I understand that some wars are necessary, but it is very important to understand what war can do to a person, even if they come through it with no physical wounds. Sgt. James was truly psychologically disturbed. James was addicted to the rush of life and death situations, and he put himself and his team in harm's way, when he should not have.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Marlow
                        [Sgt. James was truly psychologically disturbed. James was addicted to the rush of life and death situations, and he put himself and his team in harm's way, when he should not have.
                        I can't dispute that. James was an adrenaline junky, although I don't remember that he put his team in danger. We had already seen the futility, in a much less dangerous situation, of the protective suit he shed.
                        James was a complicated man. Callous on the surface vs. his risky solo mission to avenge the young boy ,with whom he had connected , whose body he thought had been booby-trapped.
                        He told his buddies he was divorced, although that was never made clear in the movie. He was a torn individual, calling home and then not speaking to his wife when she answered.
                        I think the film maker put in the segment of his visit home partially to contrast the abundance of the supermarket with the street stalls in Iraq. I interpreted that as part of James motivation to re-up. Although he would never admit it, he cared about his mission and the people
                        Or,maybe I am giving him too much credit.
                        I think it is a great movie precisely because different viewers will come away with different impressions and opinions.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lonewolf
                          I think it is a great movie precisely because different viewers will come away with different impressions and opinions.
                          I agree. Even my wife and I couldn't fully assess his motivations.

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                          • #14
                            I downloaded it, really dug it and watched it again. I think Sgt. James is really depressed about his life and thus has no fear of dying. But, instead of doing something stupid, unproductive and something will cause shame on his family, like quietly committing suicide in the toilet, or shooting at American cops (who will then kill him), he utilizes the power of his own death wish to do something good/productive and actually saves the lives of people who DO want to live.

                            I don't want to demean this high-quality film by putting it in the same category, but that theme is similar to the Mel Gibson-Danny Glover film "Lethal Weapon." Gibson wanted to die, but couldn't do it himself, so he would do outrageously brave things (half-hoping he'd be killed.)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by richxx87
                              I downloaded it, really dug it and watched it again. I think Sgt. James is really depressed about his life and thus has no fear of dying. . . . he utilizes the power of his own death wish to do something good/productive and actually saves the lives of people who DO want to live.
                              Really? I thought he did NOT want to die; in fact he was really jazzed about his next bomb and needed his next fix. He loved his wife and son, but his addiction to adrenaline was stronger. The incident at the end with Beckham showed his total alienation - people bummed him out, but bombs turned him on. The barracks stomach-punching scene was all about this too.

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