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Newsweek's list of the 100 best books ever

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  • #46
    Originally posted by bad hammy
    Originally posted by Daisy
    So while a command of English is important, one of the largest deficiencies in the student population is the inability to get to grips with relatively complex concepts.
    Both are important. The problems faced by those who grow up in our educational system are indicative of a dumbing down of standards starting early on, and folks never catching up.
    No disagreement from me on that.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Daisy
      one of the largest deficiencies in the student population is the ability to get to grips with relatively complex concepts.
      And most, if not all of my books above, deal with exceedingly complex issues of human nature. If you can't figure out what makes other people tick, you can't succeed at the most important venture in human experience, interpersonal relationships.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Marlow
        If you can't figure out what makes other people tick, you can't succeed at the most important venture in human experience, interpersonal relationships.
        Interpersonal relationships are the most important venture in human experience...this coming from a man who appears to spend a fair portion of his life in front of a computer screen....you're killing me, Marlow.... :lol:

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by K.I.R.
          Originally posted by catson52
          For typical Americans of today, the main characters of The Great Gatsby have little relevance.
          On the contrary, I think most Americans of today might as well be characters in The Great Gatsby. Unrestrained self-indulgence, materialism, amorality leading to immorality ... what have I missed?
          An interesting point. As far as I can figure out The Great Gatsby has been on the "must" reading list at most schools for many years. (I know at least 20 years and guess it is much more). So what did the greedy boys of today and yesterday grow up reading and did they learn anything from it? What about Ken Lay, Madoff, Sanford and Co.? Just reading stuff does nothing for you. Another American master, O'Henry is much shunned nowadays. He outlined the basics of con artists pretty well particularly with his Jeff Peters and Andy Tucker stories. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose. May as well add O'Henry to the "must" reading list. And why not add Leonardo da Vinci to the reading list - "he who would be rich in a day, will hang in a year".

          Comment


          • #50
            I think the list strikes a nice balance. Most (if not all) genres are represented. I've read 11 of those. My interests lie more in the Fantasy and Sci-Fi realm, and even those were mentioned in the list.

            Not a bad list at all.

            Lord Of The Rings (arguably the Fantasy godfather)

            The Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck nailed it)

            Gulliver's Travels (don't remember much of this)

            Canterbury Tales ( a high school requirement )

            The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe (VERY pleased to see C.S. Lewis included)

            To Kill A Mockingbird (A simple yet powerful tale )

            The Bible (Many times over. If you're a Believer or not, this is fantastic writing)

            Frankenstien (SO, SO pleased to see this. It's such a moving/touching story. Really a tear-jerker if you ask me. Nothing like any of the movies)

            Animal Farm (scary and thought provoking)

            Lord of the Flies (read this as a teenager. Was floored. Amazing)

            Charlotte's Web (As a child. Cute tale with nice undercurrents)


            I don't care what anyone says, Stephen King deserved at least ONE book on the list. He's a genious.

            List could have seen Bradbury, Wells, Verne and a host of others.

            BUT, like I said it was a decent list.

            Fun, fun, fun!!
            You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

            Comment


            • #51
              Does anyone here have a positive opinion about Herman Wouk's " The Winds of War" and its sequel, " War and Remembrance" ? I have read and re-read them both multiple times through the years.

              Comment


              • #52
                By the way....this is a GREAT thread. Interesting. Good way of getting to know others.
                You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by 2 cents
                  you're killing me, Marlow
                  Were that I were. As a TOE, I talk with people about intellectual pursuits far more than the average two-bit . . . I mean 2 cent . . . internet poster. :P

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Marlow
                    As a TOE, I talk with people about intellectual pursuits far more than the average two-bit . . . I mean 2 cent . . . internet poster. :P
                    Your recent streak of obnoxious arrogance has not left the building, obviously . . .

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by bad hammy
                      Originally posted by Marlow
                      As a TOE, I talk with people about intellectual pursuits far more than the average two-bit . . . I mean 2 cent . . . internet poster. :P
                      Your recent streak of obnoxious arrogance has not left the building, obviously . . .
                      reread it, dear hammy - not speaking to YOU! :roll:

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Marlow
                        reread it, dear hammy - not speaking to YOU! :roll:
                        I understand that I was not the specific target, but generically it was quite arrogant. Harkens back to your movie review posts.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by bad hammy
                          Originally posted by Marlow
                          reread it, dear hammy - not speaking to YOU! :roll:
                          I understand that I was not the specific target, but generically it was quite arrogant. Harkens back to your movie review posts.
                          Barking up this tree does not become you, bro!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            As one who works with the language (and others), and had a more-than-solid grounding in the classics in high school I gotta say that most of the books on these lists are pretentious to the point of being unreadable. (Mr. Michelin 3-star prefers Big Macs?)

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by catson52
                              An interesting point. As far as I can figure out The Great Gatsby has been on the "must" reading list at most schools for many years. (I know at least 20 years and guess it is much more). So what did the greedy boys of today and yesterday grow up reading and did they learn anything from it? What about Ken Lay, Madoff, Sanford and Co.? Just reading stuff does nothing for you. Another American master, O'Henry is much shunned nowadays. He outlined the basics of con artists pretty well particularly with his Jeff Peters and Andy Tucker stories. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose. May as well add O'Henry to the "must" reading list. And why not add Leonardo da Vinci to the reading list - "he who would be rich in a day, will hang in a year".
                              I know it's all the rage to have a go at the financial sector, but what I was talking about has permeated much more thoroughly than just Wall Street.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                think most Americans of today might as well be characters in The Great Gatsby.
                                I don't have Jay's cash, but I do live in West Egg and spend alot of time staring at East Egg.
                                have a positive opinion about Herman Wouk's " The Winds of War" ? "
                                "There's nothing left to do but win the war" (Pug) is one of my fav literary sentences.

                                Comment

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