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  • Overcrowded prison debacle

    "A panel of three federal judges has ordered California to reduce its prison population by about 40,000 by mid-September. The judges acted on the grounds that overcrowded prisons violate inmates' constitutional rights."

    What about the innocent people's rights who were violated by these imbeciles? Do they count? Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. :roll: :roll:


    http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/08/25/ ... index.html
    If you're ever walking down the beach and you see a girl dressed in a bikini made out of seashells, and you pick her up and hold her to your ear, you can hear her scream.

  • #2
    I am not a proponent of Get Out of Jail Free cards, but the prison population has soared in California due to tougher sentencing. Too tough now, or too lenient before ? I can't say.

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    • #3
      As our population grows, so does the number of criminals.

      I've never quite undertsood why people cite growing prison populations without mentioning overall population growth in the same sentence.

      We should work to reduce recidivism rates by making prison a horrible experience (hard manual labor, no tv, no conjucal visits, only water drink, etc).

      That's another reason they're overcrowded...crooks dont mind going back.
      The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TrackDaddy
        That's another reason they're overcrowded...crooks dont mind going back.
        ...and don't forget there's $$$$ to be made as private contractors are getting in the prison business (in terms of building facilities, employing those who have to man the facilities, and the warehousing of inmates).

        Howver, the question becomes after you continue stacking folks in prison, what happens to those whose sentances are up and due to be released. If they haven't learn'd concrete skills to successfully be re-intergrated into society, the same problem persists.

        While I'm not too in favor of a return to the Brubaker days of prison, some of what's occuring (manual labor, no TV, and such) isn't so bad. However, I believe you have to off-set some of that with some programs that are designed to re-intergrate inmates into society.

        Not everyone has life or multiple life (+399 year) sentances.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Dietmar239
          What about the innocent people's rights who were violated by these imbeciles?
          I would think, there are many inmates that committed "victimless crimes", such as non-violent drug users that never harmed anybody.
          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
          by Thomas Henry Huxley

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pego
            Originally posted by Dietmar239
            What about the innocent people's rights who were violated by these imbeciles?
            I would think, there are many inmates that committed "victimless crimes", such as non-violent drug users that never harmed anybody.
            \
            \It is my ( limited, yes) understanding that the huge increase in incarcerated Californians is in this category.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pego

              I would think, there are many inmates that committed "victimless crimes", such as non-violent drug users that never harmed anybody.
              According to Kristof in NYT it's 82 percent sentenced of non-violent crimes.

              The US sure leads the world in prisons, about five times the world average.

              Comment


              • #8
                How come no one ever thinks of the obvious solution to prison over crowding? You just start executing the worst criminals until you get down to capacity. :evil:
                Choose your "smiley"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lonewolf
                  How come no one ever thinks of the obvious solution to prison over crowding? You just start executing the worst criminals until you get down to capacity. :evil:
                  Choose your "smiley"
                  Works for me or ship em to Texas

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you're sending them to TX why keep them in prison? That's punishment enough. 8-)
                    If you're ever walking down the beach and you see a girl dressed in a bikini made out of seashells, and you pick her up and hold her to your ear, you can hear her scream.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Per Andersen
                      Originally posted by Pego

                      I would think, there are many inmates that committed "victimless crimes", such as non-violent drug users that never harmed anybody.
                      According to Kristof in NYT it's 82 percent sentenced of non-violent crimes..
                      I'd believe the Department of Justice stats over those of a vapid artist.

                      DOJ reports that 53 percent of prisoners in the US are violent offenders.

                      Given that the clearance rates of non-violent crimes are abysmal, it's safe to assume that those who are in prison are very bad people who have most likely committed many crimes for which they were never caught.


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by malmo
                        Given that the clearance rates of non-violent crimes are abysmal
                        Statistics I saw indicate about 500,000 (out of a total prison population of about 2.3 mil) being incarcerated for "non-violent drug offenses". I don't know, how many of them are dealers, but no doubt, several hundred thousand, between 10 and 20% of the total are users that caused no harm to anybody.
                        "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                        by Thomas Henry Huxley

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Good thing prohibition isn't still in effect - the prisons would really be overflowing then. And then there are the tobacco smokers. It seems so ridiculous to have people in jails for smoking a joint. We know it's going to change, so change it now. My opinion, only.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Pretty tough to refute DOJ statistics.

                            http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/prisons.htm

                            "In 2005 there were an estimated 687,700 state prisoners serving time for a violent offense. State prisons also held an estimated 248,900 property offenders and 253,300 drug offenders."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pego
                              Originally posted by malmo
                              Statistics I saw indicate about 500,000 (out of a total prison population of about 2.3 mil) being incarcerated for "non-violent drug offenses". I don't know, how many of them are dealers, but no doubt, several hundred thousand, between 10 and 20% of the total are users that caused no harm to anybody.
                              There's no such thing as "non violent drug offenses." If it involves drugs, there is a human toll -- and there is violence.

                              20% of all inmates are there for drug offenses. These aren't angels.

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