Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ban qatar and bahrain!!!!!!!!!

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Allowing athletes to change nationalities will not end Western Civilization as we know it.
    For the third time Marlow, I (we) are not asking for it to be disallowed. All I (we) are saying, cases like Macypura are a sham.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley

    Comment


    • #47
      Imagine if the NY Yankees could only have athletes from NY. How ridicuolous would that be?

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Pego
        Igor Macypura was born in Kiev, as a young boy the family emigrated to USA. He became a figure skater of insufficient talent to make the US team. Either he or the Ukrainians were not interested in an association, so he approached Slovak authorities. He was accepted and now he represents Slovakia. The guy lives in Colorado Springs, visits Slovakia for the national championship. I am pretty sure, he doesn't speak the language either.

        How is this for a joke?
        that's not the only one, pego. remember that (hungarian?) woman hammer thrower who decided on a whim to represent cameroon? not that she'd ever live there or learn the language. there's plenty of these cases in figure skating and beach volleyball as well.

        marlow, you and others are obviously not reading well. there are clubs, have you heard of those?, such as chelsea football, etc. they can buy whoever they want. countries are not private clubs/teams. if that's the case, why bother have national sports committees? why bother have the world champs? why not a world club champ? and then bahrain clubs can compete with qatar clubs, and that's all there'll be. each gets 3 entrants in each event, the world champs are among 6 athletes. great work, marlow.

        Comment


        • #49
          Marlow, your idea that the WC/OG are not about medal counts is a myopic view. Without national uniforms and the desire to put a higher number on the medal table, a huge chunk of the public interest (and therefore, the public money) is gone, making things far more grim for the athletes from a monetary perspective than the status quo.

          No one rational is saying that athletes should never be allowed to change nationality -- just that the word "nationality" should not be perverted for the sake of sport and money.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Pego
            For the third time Marlow, I (we) are not asking for it to be disallowed. All I (we) are saying, cases like Macypura are a sham.
            And my point remains that your statement is only in your opinion. Many of us think it's merely a representation of a free-market economy.

            Originally posted by cacique
            marlow, you and others are obviously not reading well. there are clubs, have you heard of those?, such as chelsea football, etc. they can buy whoever they want. countries are not private clubs/teams. if that's the case, why bother have national sports committees? why bother have the world champs? why not a world club champ? and then bahrain clubs can compete with qatar clubs, and that's all there'll be. each gets 3 entrants in each event, the world champs are among 6 athletes. great work, marlow.
            Oh, you want to talk soccer. There are literally of DOZENS of international soccer players who do NOT represent their home country - instead they find some byzantine connection (my babysitter's cousin's hair-dresser's dogwalker's sister-in-law is Qatari) to a country they can play for. FIFA buys it.

            Comment


            • #51
              Of note, the Olympic Charter states that if an athlete represents one country in the Olympics, they cannot represent another until they have been a citizen there for three years. There are exceptions, usually by mutual consent of the nations, in which case the receiving nation pays a lot of money to the donor nation (now usually Middle East to African runner's nations).

              There are no rules concerning an athletes who has not already competed at the Olympic Games for another country, however. Jacques Rogge has commented on this and said that they need to take a look at it, but unlikely anything will happen.

              Its happened for the US as well. In 2008, there were two American basketball players, one male, one female, who played for Russia in Beijing. Neither could make the US team, and were playing professionally in Russia. In 1976, Diane de Leeuw, a US figure skater, did not look like she could make the US team, so she used her mother's Dutch citizenship, and started competing for the Netherlands. She became World Champion, and won a silver medal in 1976 behind Dorothy Hamill, so she could have eventually made the US Team, obviously, but had made her decision. There are many, many other cases. Another recent one was the Canadian ice dancer Tanith Beldin who got US citizenship to compete with an American partner.

              Is it right? I don't know. Not sure who I agree with here. Is it a pain in the ass to an Olympic statistician who keeps a database of all Olympic competitors and has to track their name changes and national changes? You bet Djibouti it is.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Marlow
                Oh, you want to talk soccer. There are literally of DOZENS of international soccer players who do NOT represent their home country - instead they find some byzantine connection (my babysitter's cousin's hair-dresser's dogwalker's sister-in-law is Qatari) to a country they can play for. FIFA buys it.
                and YOU, your hairdresser (specially him), fifa, qatar and bahrain are still DEAD WRONG!

                Comment


                • #53
                  A reasonable process of actually changing Countries is fine. But I just can not see how it is positive for any Country to just pay "foreigners" enough to compete under their National Flag. I am sure that many other Countries would just throw in the towel (or flag) at that point, because it absolutely flies in the face of why many tax-payers in many countries support their National Teams. And medal counts are not the issue, Marlow....just so you don't say that again, as opposed to again.
                  I assume that any USA folks that are in support of this idea would be just fine if Gay, Richards, Felix, etc.., etc., etc., were offered multi-million dollar, multi-year contracts to race for "X" country for the next few years, and that was all good with the various governing bodies. Is that fine with all?

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by rasb
                    A reasonable process of actually changing Countries is fine. But I just can not see how it is positive for any Country to just pay "foreigners" enough to compete under their National Flag. I am sure that many other Countries would just throw in the towel (or flag) at that point, because it absolutely flies in the face of why many tax-payers in many countries support their National Teams. And medal counts are not the issue, Marlow....just so you don't say that again, as opposed to again.
                    I assume that any USA folks that are in support of this idea would be just fine if Gay, Richards, Felix, etc.., etc., etc., were offered multi-million dollar, multi-year contracts to race for "X" country for the next few years, and that was all good with the various governing bodies. Is that fine with all?
                    I agreed with Marlow that under certain rules, it should be legal, but I still consider it a sham. Not everything legal is either moral or proper.
                    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                    by Thomas Henry Huxley

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Pego
                      I agreed with Marlow that under certain rules, it should be legal, but I still consider it a sham. Not everything legal is either moral or proper.
                      Do I hear my song? :lol:

                      The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by cacique
                        and YOU, your hairdresser (specially him), fifa, qatar and bahrain are still DEAD WRONG!
                        and I still defend your right to say that!!

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Its a freaking business, dont you get it? Do you want someone putting limits on how you make a living. Imagine the kids at home starving but at least daddy is running for his home country.
                          phsstt!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by SQUACKEE
                            Its a freaking business, dont you get it? Do you want someone putting limits on how you make a living. Imagine the kids at home starving but at least daddy is running for his home country.
                            What he said. :twisted:

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              After all this "strum und drang" in a teapot, I have an epiphany. I don't give a hoot, one way or 'tother. Let the athletes do whatever it takes to create a payday or chance to compete on the world stage and let delusional countries feel a foreigners success somehow reflects positively on his/her "adopted" country.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by lonewolf
                                After all this "strum und drang" in a teapot, I have an epiphany. I don't give a hoot, one way or 'tother. Let the athletes do whatever it takes to create a payday or chance to compete on the world stage and let delusional countries feel a foreigners success somehow reflects positively on his/her "adopted" country.
                                What he said . . . too.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X