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  • The Fastest Man in the Prison Yard

    "In here, people say, 'Oh, we haven't really heard of you.' Then it's, 'You had the world record? OK, now we know.' That means something."

    The World's Fastest Man has morphed into the fastest man in the prison yard. He is unbeaten there at every distance from 40 to 100 meters. He says he heads up a training group of about 15 inmates who work out regularly on the grass football and soccer fields.

    "You're in here with testosterone levels higher than ever," he says. "They say, 'You might be fast, but not without that juice [steroids].' I say, 'OK, tell me how far you want to go.' I can say this: I haven't lost yet. I have an inner challenge. If you want to fight, I'm gonna fight back.

    "In here, it is all about satisfaction and respect. Running has always been an outlet in my life. Since I've been here, my spirits have been low from time to time. I turn to the Bible a lot, and running. When you first get here, it is a respect thing. You know, 'Tim Montgomery is here.' Now, every time some new [inmate] gets off the bus, it's 'Can you run? You fast?'"

    http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/trackandf ... id=4487014
    The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

  • #2
    That is a very, very sad story. A cautionary tale for kids who think they need a fast-track (npi) to the top.

    Comment


    • #3
      To conform to the forum's current posting paradigm, let's change the title to "Can Bolt be the Fastest Man in the Prison Yard?", and hypothesize what his time would be if he was arrested and had to race Tim Montgomery. (Then Pelpa can ponder how much his potential corporate worth in China would change.)

      I've got the wind conditions covered. If the prison is Supermax, there'll be altitude assistance!

      Comment


      • #4
        Sad story.

        I wouldn't weep for Montgomery though, he knew what he was doing.

        Cautionary....that's correct. Hopefully others can take something from this.




        On a side note of interest to me is which of Marion Jones' sons will be faster;

        Montgomery's

        Thompson's


        Given the same training and interest.
        You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

        Comment


        • #5
          I say Thompson's because he ran 9.69. :-)

          They're both growing up in TX which means the gridiron will reap the benefits of that family's speed for sure!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JRM
            To conform to the forum's current posting paradigm, let's change the title to "Can Bolt be the Fastest Man in the Prison Yard?", and hypothesize what his time would be if he was arrested and had to race Tim Montgomery. (Then Pelpa can ponder how much his potential corporate worth in China would change.)

            I've got the wind conditions covered. If the prison is Supermax, there'll be altitude assistance!
            Tsk JRM, tsk. Its unbecoming that you are going to go all over the board and "mash up" threads to voice your personal feelings about the youngster or your fellow poster. One thing though; I hope your feeelings towards him wouldn't affect your alitutude adjustments if ever your input is infused.
            In danger of being an irony to myself, I will offer a comment on the topic at hand out respect to the board and say:

            I would love to see Timmy get a prison relay together and rally for a local meet. Now that would be a banger (would this be allowable given that they are are a minimum security prison)!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Marlow
              That is a very, very sad story. A cautionary tale for kids who think they need a fast-track (npi) to the top.
              I agree Marlow with you and scott.

              I've never been accused of being naive, but on this one -with Monty and Marion- those jokers had me completely fooled. I want this story to ring out loud and clear as you mentioned for our youth to see what fraud will get you.

              In reading the story I was little perpelexed at the seemingly unstructured apparatus that is the doping game. Its almost as though they were winging it with very little knowledge of medicine or science on their sides. In the article Monty speaks of Conte being a braggart which by know we've all noticed. But its also clear he was no scientist or pharmacologoist which to me is even scarier when you consider they may still be cheating if not for snitching on each other.

              How does a novice or amatuer chemist get away with that level of deception if organized bodies exists to stop them?!?

              Anyway...Marion, Monty, Conte, Graham, etc all need their pinstripe profiles taken behind bars posted in every teenage "what not to do" forum in this country.
              The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

              Comment


              • #8
                We can say this is a cautionary tale all we want ... but please, don't be naive. How many cautionary tales have been told over the last two decades or so in sports? I'm not just talking about steroids, but everything else: women, drugs, guns, cheating, etc.

                Whenever there's money involved, cautionary tales are quickly forgotten or simply ignored. Hungry people will chase the cash and take the risks. Happens over and over. Everyone thinks they'll be the ones who will beat the system.

                And you know what? I bet there are more cheaters who did get away than those who got caught.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What I took most from this article was this: Marion Jones not only had lousy taste in men, but she made one bad choice after another.

                  People say she was this smart, educated woman, yada, yada, yada, but in hindsight, was she really all that smart?

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                  • #10
                    You dont think ANYONE will observe what happened with Monty and choose a different route because of what happened to him?

                    Surely someone will be cautioned.
                    The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Do car wrecks etc. stop teenagers driving like idiots? Most think they will not crash, as, I assume, criminals think they will not be caught.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Daisy
                        Do car wrecks etc. stop teenagers driving like idiots? Most think they will not crash, as, I assume, criminals think they will not be caught.
                        Some teens, yes. Not all, but some.

                        And criminals arent deterred by anything, because at the point you can call them criminals its too late because they've crossed the line.

                        I don't know about you but if knowing it as wrong wasn't enough, then the penalty for committing a crime is certainly a deterrent for me.
                        The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I take that back. Marion Jones was driven by money, of course, and also the most enticing carrot of all: Flo Jo's records.

                          Every female sprinter in track knows that if they get either record, big $$ is coming. The 100 and 200 records are the proverbial twin pots of gold. Can you imagine the bonuses that are tied to those records?

                          Now we're talking Usain Bolt money.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                            Originally posted by Daisy
                            Do car wrecks etc. stop teenagers driving like idiots?
                            Some teens, yes. Not all, but some.
                            Not enough.

                            Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                            I don't know about you but if knowing it as wrong wasn't enough, then the penalty for committing a crime is certainly a deterrent for me.
                            But who is the target audience? Clearly deterrents don't work for many.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pelpa
                              Tsk JRM, tsk. Its unbecoming that you are going to go all over the board and "mash up" threads to voice your personal feelings about the youngster or your fellow poster.
                              Relax, Pelpa. It's a joke. I have nothing but admiration and respect for Mr. Bolt and his unparalleled accomplishments in our sport.

                              Comment

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