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R.I.P.-Bob Feller

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  • R.I.P.-Bob Feller

    http://mlb.fanhouse.com/2010/12/15/b...ec1_lnk1|31672

    http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/news/tributes...r.jsp?c_id=cle

    Never made it there myself, but if you're in Des Moines for a meet, you might want to visit the Bob Feller Museum in nearby Van Meter, Iowa(his hometown)
    http://www.bobfellermuseum.org/

  • #2
    Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

    Rapid Robert was one of the very few legit 100mph+ throwers in MLB history. Great life story.
    RIP, Heater.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

      When he was a high schooler playing American Legion ball, his catcher--at least for one year--was Nile Kinnick.

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      • #4
        Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

        I remember reading a story about Feller when I was in elementary school and it talked about how he became the fastest pitcher because when he was a kid he spent hours on the farm throwing apples against the side of the barn.

        If only my family had had a barn or an apple tree I mighta been a 100mph dude too!

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        • #5
          Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

          Ever the frugal nit-picker, that strikes me as a lot of apples to '"waste" in Depression era Iowa. I would believe rocks, except there are few surface rocks in the deep loam of central Iowa.

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          • #6
            Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

            Originally posted by lonewolf
            Ever the frugal nit-picker, that strikes me as a lot of apples to '"waste" in Depression era Iowa. I would believe rocks, except there are few surface rocks in the deep loam of central Iowa.
            I agree with that. Even if they weren't very good apples. My 89 year old mother grew up, not far away, in Eastern Nebraska with stories from the 1930's of huge dust storms and other hardships.

            When I was growing up we use to play baseball against the side of the house with a square for balls and strikes. Using a tennis ball, I threw thousands of times against wall and I could have thrown it a million times and never, ever would have come close to 100 mph.

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            • #7
              Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

              My dad says he was the best pitcher he ever saw.

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              • #8
                Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

                Trivia question re Feller. Who was the valedictorian of his high school graduating class? And why is that a trivia question of some import?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

                  I woke up with a Eureka moment... Feller was throwing "crab apples", "wild apples" or "horse apples", (not to be confused with dried horse droppings, also called horse apples)
                  the fruit of a small, bristly, flowering tree that in most varities produces a very sour baseball sized fruit that was kinda knobby and woody. They facilitate pollination in apple orchards but in my old stomping grounds grew wild along bar (borrow)ditches and windrows, possibly the residue of failed attemps to grow apples in that hot, semi-arid country.
                  My maternal grandfather, who was born in Missouri, came to Oklahoma in 1902 (after already having homesteaded in western Kansas) when the Kiowa-Comance reservation was opened for homesteading. He planted a five acre orchard north of his homestead house, both for food and as a windbreak. Reportedly it was productive in the early years but by the time I was born in 1931, there was a solitary pear tree that produced a few pears some years but was great for climbing and mounting horses before we got big enough to grab a mane and swing up from the ground.
                  That orchard was (and still is) surrounded by unbroken buffalo grass pasture. The pasture has reclaimed it but when I was a child it was a cotton field where, when I was about six years old, was first trusted to drive a team of horses pulling a riding cultivator. A man could lift the levers raising the plow shares to make turns at the end of the rows but I had to dismount from the seat and overhead press the levers. Wise old Maude and Daisy, who had been farming for twenty years, patiently waited while I made the lift, then turned onto the next row and waited while I reversed the process. At noontime, I would unhitch the team, climb the harness onto Maude's back and ride them to the stock tank a quarter mile north of the house where they would walk belly deep into the pond to drink and I would dive from Maudes back into the water..(cultivation is in July when the temp is over 100 F and a mid-day plunge was eagerly anticipated in those un-airconditioned days . )
                  Today, I, and OSHA, would not think of turning a six year old loose with two tons of draft horses but these were special horses and in those days it was unremarkable.. what could possibly go wrong?.. I was, after all, close to the house
                  While crab apples would shatter if thrown against a barn, they do indeed make excellent, stinging ammunition in juvenile "horse apple" fights.
                  (Those of you who may have previously read/heard this narrative, please forgive my rambling)

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                  • #10
                    Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

                    lonewolf: Wonderful story!

                    I spent my first eight years in a semi-rural area in Connecticut. Across the road from our house was a general farm, which had chickens, hogs, several cows and two draft horses. Only the older (over six years old!) kids were allowed on the horses, but the younger ones among us were allowed to ride the cows.

                    You'd have to coax any of the animals over to the five-foot rail fence to be able to mount them, and we never rode outside the pen, but for a kindergartner with a cap gun it was a great way to play Lone Ranger!

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                    • #11
                      Re: R.I.P.-Bob Feller

                      He predicted Jackie Robinson would be a bust, said he was too muscle bound. Great hurler. A few years ago, when Ali received a lifetime honor, Feller said he wasn't worthy of the award because he dodged the draft.

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