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The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

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  • #16
    Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

    IMHO, there are two extremes in viewing this affair and both reflect badly (as in putrid corruption) on the NCAA.
    First, these athletes knew that they were skirting the rules and the NCAA is fully justified in imposing a punishment, BUT how the heck can the consequence for bad acts this year begin next year when there is a game next week? The hypocrisy here absolutely stinks... is there a single high school coach who would tell a kid that he is suspended from the team for violating policies but not until after he plays in the big game next week? (Yeah, I know that there are lots of high school coaches who would do that, more's the pity.)
    Second, the initial reaction of the athletes was to say that since they were given these items, they were personal property and they ought to be entitled to sell the stuff. Actually, this makes more sense to me than the NCAA stance. If the powers that be don't want athletes to benefit then the athletes should not be given personal property that has actual cash value or collector value! Period.

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    • #17
      Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

      Originally posted by jhc68
      First, these athletes knew that they were skirting the rules. . . .the initial reaction of the athletes was to say that since they were given these items, they were personal property and they ought to be entitled to sell the stuff.
      Because of the latter, I would say the former is a moot point.
      Reminds me of the 'free shoes' debacle at FSU a while back. Football players were told that they could come into the Footlocker store after hours and get some free gear. So they did. If you told that to ANY college kid, 99.9% would have also done it. I certainly would have! Similarly, if you GIVE stuff to athletes, why is it NOT theirs to do with as they please, i.e., sell if they so desire. Heismans have been sold!! Whether or not you're on the NCAA's clock seems irrelevant to me.

      But . . . once it's made out to be a suspendable offense, and you LET them play in the Bowl, that's just poor all the way around, right up to the University's President (wasn't he the one that already acted all high and mighty before?)

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      • #18
        Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

        Originally posted by jhc68
        IMHO, there are two extremes in viewing this affair and both reflect badly (as in putrid corruption) on the NCAA.
        First, these athletes knew that they were skirting the rules and the NCAA is fully justified in imposing a punishment, BUT how the heck can the consequence for bad acts this year begin next year when there is a game next week? The hypocrisy here absolutely stinks... is there a single high school coach who would tell a kid that he is suspended from the team for violating policies but not until after he plays in the big game next week? (Yeah, I know that there are lots of high school coaches who would do that, more's the pity.)
        All you have to do is look at the doublespeak in the NCAA's own statement for the answer to this question
        recognizes the unique opportunity these events provide at the end of a season, and they are evaluated differently from a withholding perspective
        Translation: We're a bunch of double-talking hypocrites.

        However, I will add that the biggest hypocrites of all are coaches like Nick Saban and Urban Meyer when they refer to agents as pimps. Remember, the crooked agents give the players money to entice the players to allow the agents to find gainful employment for the player, while the coaches give the players zilch while earning millions of dollars off of their free labor.

        Originally posted by jhc68
        Second, the initial reaction of the athletes was to say that since they were given these items, they were personal property and they ought to be entitled to sell the stuff. Actually, this makes more sense to me than the NCAA stance. If the powers that be don't want athletes to benefit then the athletes should not be given personal property that has actual cash value or collector value! Period.
        In principle, I'm okay with players selling personal items, but I can also see why the NCAA would want to stay off the slippery slope of players selling personal items to boosters for ridiculous amounts of money.

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        • #19
          Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

          Cutting to the chase: Contradictory/hypocritical rulings are the hallmark of the NCAA.
          That said:

          1. Selling of personal items should NOT be a NCAA offense.
          2. Since the NCAA has the authority to deem it so, penalties should be administered immediately, not deferred.

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          • #20
            Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

            The sad thing would be if the universities just stop giving these things all together because of the football players. There are a lot of athletes, including my nephew and nieces who compete in the Big Ten in track and really honor these tokens.

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            • #21
              Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

              Originally posted by Marlow
              Reminds me of the 'free shoes' debacle at FSU a while back. Football players were told that they could come into the Footlocker store after hours and get some free gear. So they did. If you told that to ANY college kid, 99.9% would have also done it. I certainly would have! Similarly, if you GIVE stuff to athletes, why is it NOT theirs to do with as they please, i.e., sell if they so desire. Heismans have been sold!! Whether or not you're on the NCAA's clock seems irrelevant to me.
              I was an NCAA athlete 11 years ago, and there was never any question that taking copious amounts of free gear because of my status as an athlete for State U would be a mistake - I imagine that for a football player in one of the premier programs in the country, that point was made dozens of times to the FSU and OSU players. We can debate whether these are silly or overly strict rules, but let's be completely clear that all of these athletes knew they were taking a risk, knew that there was potential hell to pay, and took the risks anyway.

              Originally posted by jazzcyclist
              Wow! Kirk Herbstreit absolutely trashed his fellow Buckeye Terrell Pryor on Colin Cowherd's radio show yesterday.
              Good for Herbstreit - this is the second time this season I've seen him take a stance that might not be popular with his bosses (the first being some fairly harsh criticism of the proliferation of all of these ESPN-owned minor bowls).

              That said, this line that Hebrstreit seems to embrace that Tressel is somehow a victim in this and that he just wants to run a clean program with class yadda yadda is as silly as Marlow's defense of Bobby Bowden in the face of FSU rules violations.

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              • #22
                Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

                Originally posted by KevinM
                That said, this line that Hebrstreit seems to embrace that Tressel is somehow a victim in this and that he just wants to run a clean program with class yadda yadda is as silly as Marlow's defense of Bobby Bowden in the face of FSU rules violations.
                I wouldn't call Tressel, or any other big-time coach football coach, a victim, but I also know that it's impossible for a coach to fully monitor the actions of 100 18-23 year-old young men. There's going to be a certain amount of knuckleheads in any group that size even at places like the service academies that you would think would weed out hte knuckleheads naturally. However, when you've had 30 players arrested in four years like Urban Meyer, you know that you're recruiting some bad actors.

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                • #23
                  Re: The Ohio State hoo-ha [split]

                  Originally posted by Conor Dary
                  The sad thing would be if the universities just stop giving these things all together because of the football players. There are a lot of athletes, including my nephew and nieces who compete in the Big Ten in track and really honor these tokens.
                  That was my entire point from the get-go. Classless clods. They should be ashamed but of course they are not.... because they are classless clods.

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