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Does he really need that vaccine?

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by polevaultpower
    ....
    I don't know, I'm a little skeptical about the link to appendicitis which may be being underreported as being linked to the HPV vaccine.
    Is their credible sourcing on this link at any level?

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    IMO, the benefits of any approved vaccination outweigh apprehension of lossible long term side effects.

    Leave a comment:


  • polevaultpower
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by El Toro
    HPV vaccine - No matter how much you hope, or train, cajole or threaten, you can't guarantee your children will make sensible sexual decisions. In fact, nature is set up to ensure the opposite, especially in relation to that highly HPV infectious girl/boy they just love so much!

    As far as I am aware, most of the reported problems early on was due to group hysteria rather than any significant problems with the vaccine, so this is also a "do it."

    I don't know, I'm a little skeptical about the link to appendicitis which may be being underreported as being linked to the HPV vaccine.

    Leave a comment:


  • kuha
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by El Toro
    Vaccines along with water purification and sewerage are the foundations of modern population health and have been for 100+ years, so there is a reason people say they are a good idea!
    Yup. There's really no reason at all to voluntarily go back to the Middle Ages.

    Leave a comment:


  • El Toro
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Hepatitis B - Do it, you can't control life enough to ensure that s/he won't catch it.

    Chicken Pox - More difficult because it is mostly a mild disease but with the occasional major negative outcome. Don't forget the risk of shingles in later life. Having known somebody that suffered badly from this it would tip me clearly to the "do it" side.

    HPV vaccine - No matter how much you hope, or train, cajole or threaten, you can't guarantee your children will make sensible sexual decisions. In fact, nature is set up to ensure the opposite, especially in relation to that highly HPV infectious girl/boy they just love so much!

    As far as I am aware, most of the reported problems early on was due to group hysteria rather than any significant problems with the vaccine, so this is also a "do it."

    Vaccines along with water purification and sewerage are the foundations of modern population health and have been for 100+ years, so there is a reason people say they are a good idea!

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    I could figure out the POS part, but had to google the SH part.... good one!

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Doctors certainly do get things wrong - we are human. But on vaccines at least, and many medical things, your choices are often to believe us or people of the ilk of James Sokolove or John Edwards, and lawyers who advertise on late-nite TV. Edwards was known in North Carolina as a complete SHPOS, and at least the rest of the nation has now seen that to be true.

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by Pego
    Standards of care have been worked out over many decades by some smart, experienced people. If you choose to modify them on your own, that is your prerogative, but there is nobody on this message board, including the physicians that know more about it than the people that developed those standards. I am old enough to have seen severe cases of infectious childhood diseases from pertussis through diphtheria (missed polio by a couple of years - never saw a fresh case) and I am most grateful for the vaccines that they are largely eliminated.
    Agree with Pego completely. Those vaccines have saved millions of lives. I am old enough to barely remember the polio epidemics and how happy my parents were when my sister and I were able to get vaccinated. Almost all of the bad stuff about vaccines has been mostly discredited, notably the autism fallacy/fraud.

    Leave a comment:


  • BisonHurdler
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by polevaultpower
    We're doing _most_ the vaccinations on schedule. I plan to delay the following:

    Hepatitis B - Most commonly spread through needle sharing and sex. Obviously no one in my immediate family has this. He's not in daycare and we may homeschool. I tentatively plan to delay this vaccine until around age 12 or so, but may do it sooner if he goes to public school. Same for Hep A, I don't remember where that one falls in the normal schedule.

    Chicken Pox - My husband and I and all of our siblings had very mild reactions to the chicken pox. I would prefer Eddie gets it naturally, but if he hasn't gotten it by about age 12 or so, I would vaccinate, I know it gets more serious as you get older.

    HPV vaccine - Will delay until my kids are old enough to make a well educated decision about it for themselves. I don't find it to be a terribly well tested vaccine, as those things go, and it will be interesting to see where things stand in 10+ years.



    SO tell me why I am wrong and that I should give my kids these vaccines on schedule? :twisted:

    1. Hep B is probably one of the vaccines I would say is a no brainer, as the benefits greatly outweigh the possible risks. I agree that many kids in the US are not at super high risk for contracting Hep B, but when they do it's not good news. Approximately 95% of infants who become infected with Hep B end up with chronic hepatitis, as opposed to about 5-10% of adults (the remainder either clear the infection completely or become chronic asymptomatic carriers). Hepatits B is a pretty awful disease, and its extremely high prevalence in asian countries is largely responsible for the very high rate of hepatocellular carcinoma there.

    Contrary to varicella (in which contracting the infection as a child is much better than as an adult), contracting Hep B as a young child just flat out sucks, and is easily avoidable.

    Hepatitis A is something I would worry much less about at this point. It's an acute disease that does not become chronic. Unless you're traveling abroad with your child, it's less of a pressing issue.


    2. As far as varicella goes, I can completely understand your viewpoint; however, vaccinating your child at a young age helps ensure that he or she will not contract the disease and more importantly (from a global gh-esque standpoint) not pass on the disease to adults who have not had the disease and/or been vaccinated.

    3. I can understand being unsure of the HPV vaccine due to its relative infancy. I know you didn't express this exact reason, but I feel that the common "this will encourage sexual activity in my daughter" is an extremely silly viewpoint. Anyway, it should be interesting what further developments occur on this horizon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by polevaultpower
    I dunno, maybe it's because my parents are doctors, but I don't believe in blindly following everything doctors recommend.
    We're not talking about individual doctors and feet-of-clay parental units; we're talking about an industry that's trying very hard to get it right, knowing that there's always a mal-practice suit just around the next ill-advised corner. Unless you really do know MORE than they do, I think it's unwise to contradict them (even though they ARE sometimes wrong!).

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Aren't the economics of C-sections such that hospitals like to do them because they make more money that way? Or is that an urban myth?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pego
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    This one is easy. Personal injury lawyers and juries feeling sorry for the bad baby regardless of anybody's negligence. Tops in my memory is a case in Phily (in eighties or nineties I believe). A baby was born with a chromosomal defect and while it was clearly shown to the jury, they still awarded a large sum, rendering the obstetrician liable. So, when faced with even the slightest possibility of stalled labor and a less-than-perfect baby, guess what. While I did my OB rotation half a century ago, I never got to see a C-section performed. We, at that time, had a next to zero risk of malpractice also.

    Leave a comment:


  • polevaultpower
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Originally posted by Pego
    I am old enough to have seen severe cases of infectious childhood diseases from pertussis through diphtheria (missed polio by a couple of years - never saw a fresh case) and I am most grateful for the vaccines that they are largely eliminated.
    Yes we are vaccinating on schedule for everything you just mentioned, and everyone in the extended family got up to date on their pertussis vaccines.

    I don't believe all vaccines are created equal though, and no, it has nothing to do with autism.

    I dunno, maybe it's because my parents are doctors, but I don't believe in blindly following everything doctors recommend. And no, I don't blindly follow something someone on a message board says either. Let me tell you, when it comes to giving birth, there is a lot that doctors recommend that is not the best thing necessarily, why do you think the c-section rate in the US is so high?

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    Becca, we've had very cogent discussion(s) on this in the past, and what I have taken away from it is that there is none of our (many) MD-types who post here who—correct me if I'm wrong—who doesn't adhere strictly to "standard" vaccination procedure. The only countering citations come from what I would kindly refer to as fringe "alternative medicine" sites.

    As mentioned elsewhere here today, if you want to get your medical advice from the public sector, then you're stuck with the Brit wacko who faked the autism data and deprived many innocent kids of protection they should have had.

    To cover myself against practicing medicine without a license, let me echo what Marlow says: yes, there are certainly cases of vaccines harming kids ("many" as an absolute number, "almost none" as a percentage, but we're dealing with huge numbers here).

    As a guy who was (just before Adam was a lad) a Bacteriology & Public Health major, with a particular interest in Immunology (taking graduate-level courses), my non-professional take is that of all the things—seriously, all—that modern medicine has brought us, perhaps nothing (including antibiotics) has done more to improve the human condition than protective injections.

    I noticed in the paper the other day that through a vigorous campaign of injections that India, one of the last hotbeds of polio (and boy, did I see many evidences of that whilst in Delhi last fall), is about to declare it gone. But it doesn't take all that many holdouts to create a reservoir for the bug.

    Off soapbox.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: Does he really need that vaccine?

    What Pego said . . . I NEVER don't listen to what the doctor recommends. My little pet fears are nothing compared to the doctors' collective experience. Can things go wrong with a vaccination? Yup. Can they go wronger if the kid gets the disease. Yup.

    Leave a comment:

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