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  • bambam1729
    replied
    This is pretty interesting:

    https://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition/

    Leave a comment:


  • AyZiggy
    replied
    A map of Europe if all separatist movements were successful
    http://imgur.com/CyJAT82
    Some of these separatist movements are more serious than others. For example, the Mercian separatist movement appears to be one guy with a Geocities-era website.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    the thread theme of "fun" doesn't exactly apply here, but this is informative: more than a century of lynchings in the U.S.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-...9&kwp_1=560115
    At least 2 groups of red skulls in the west (Oregon, Wyoming) were massacres of Chinese miners. You can check the dates and locations and read the stories on Google. And if you look at Texas you see a slew of yellow skulls(Mexicans) around 1915. Apparently the Texas Rangers killed thousands of Mexicans between 1915-1919. .
    Last edited by jeremyp; 03-30-2017, 04:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karl
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    the thread theme of "fun" doesn't exactly apply here, but this is informative: more than a century of lynchings in the U.S.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-...9&kwp_1=560115
    Not exactly a mid-day pick me up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karl
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    How do you define "straight", other than by longitude, given that the world is not flat?
    What do you mean "...is not flat"?

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    the thread theme of "fun" doesn't exactly apply here, but this is informative: more than a century of lynchings in the U.S.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-...9&kwp_1=560115

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    How do you define "straight", other than by longitude, given that the world is not flat?
    Quite true, as noted in my recent post.. those sides are curved !

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    That name the states deal ( for me at least) was easy ( 50/50 ) ... particularly because Colorado and Wyoming did not have dual choices of either for either of them. NM and AZ had a dual choice for one of them, so that took a closer look. Ditto for ND and SD.

    As to the phrase "rectangular" for CO and WY, not quite so... they, like most similar N-to S boundaries, are longitudinal, meaning these sides are arcs.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    How do you define "straight", other than by longitude, given that the world is not flat?

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    How about the No. 2 religion in each state?

    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-l...tianity-2014-6
    Hey, I thought discussing religion and politics on this board was a no-no??? You're supposed to know the rules - you wrote 'em!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Newly unclassified CIA maps. Don't know if we've done this.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ciagov...7674854602812/

    Leave a comment:


  • br
    replied
    The World's Tallest and Shortest Countries

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/ma...-in-the-world/

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Up close there are many oddities in state boundaries. When the oil biz reached the Texas panhandle in the early 20th century they discovered many "vacancies" between decades old surveys that were not accounted for.. enterprising drillers claimed them and there are hundreds of oil wells on these overlooked strips.

    Leave a comment:


  • Master403
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
    Only Co and WY are "identical" in shape with no wiggles in the border.
    Certainly for the purposes of this quiz, and differentiating between states, this is correct, but I ran across something recently that fascinated me.

    Heaven knows I'll never be able to work this into a conversation, so maybe hooking to your comment is the only way I'll be able to share this.

    I enter a lot of addresses in my smartphone contacts as GPS coordinates. While I was snagging the Four Corners coordinates, I noted some deviations in Google Maps along the Utah-Colorado border. That got me curious, so I found a few references, including

    http://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/surv...-utahs-border/

    The 276-mile border between Utah and Colorado was the result of an 1879 survey. Although the survey hit the Wyoming line over a mile west of the expected point, the survey was accepted as official. (Considering the equipment of the day, this was pretty much spot on.) Subsequent work identified a westward one-mile error between mileposts 81 and 89 and another half-mile westward between 100 and 110.

    Even though there are identified surveying errors, the official border remains the accepted 1879 survey, as Utah and Colorado have never acted to revise it.

    On a much larger scale, check out the history of the Northwest Angle above Minnesota.
    Last edited by Master403; 03-04-2017, 02:55 AM.

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  • gh
    replied
    ooo! it also contians a sub-map with religion by county

    Leave a comment:

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