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  • Atticus
    replied
    Best drive we've had is across Colorado from Denver Pikes Peak to Durango and then up to Ouray and back across to Denver, Some scary stretches of road (sheer cliff drop-offs!), but ruggedly amazing. Tried off-road on the Alpine Loop, but WAAAY too scary for us suburbanites. We're doing Utah and N Ariz as part of our Eugene22 trip.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by J Rorick View Post
    I've driven most of Wyoming 212 (Beartooth Highway) in Wyoming & Montana, and it may be the most scenic I've ever traversed.
    I've been to all 50 US states and have done some very scenic drives. But when I think of scenic drives, what immediately pops into my mind is the Canadian Rockies. Mrs. tandfman and I once drove from Edmonton west to Jasper Lake, an overnight there and then down to Lake Louise, an overnight there and then East to Banff for another overnight, then to Calgary for the flight back to the US. Amazing trip. Fantastic scenery and excellent hotels at each stop.

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  • J Rorick
    replied
    I've driven most of Wyoming 212 (Beartooth Highway) in Wyoming & Montana, and it may be the most scenic I've ever traversed. I also did almost all of Arizona 160. I'll claim 2 1/2 of these, since I've gone on U.S. 50 numerous times (albeit in California on the way to Tahoe & Carson City before it crosses Nevada & Central Utah; I don't believe it comes near Arches or Canyonlands NPs, however, as stated in the article).
    Last edited by J Rorick; 12-08-2020, 04:45 AM.

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  • El Toro
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Hmm, FL-29, huh? I've been on it and the reason it's so quiet is that there's nothing on it, including no interesting scenery (scrub brush and then swamp). Pass.
    Sounds interesting and varied compared to the Hay Plains in Australia, formerly an ancient lake bed, so one of the flattest places on earth. Takes about 4-5 hours to traverse and mostly looks like this: https://sleeplivetravel.files.wordpr...6/img_3063.jpg

    An incredibly soporific drive, interspersed with random moments of terror as a mob of kangaroos cross in front of you, especially if it's at 3am.

    However, a very good place for stargazing due to lack of light pollution and the southern sky is a revelation for northern hemispherians. More info: https://travelista.club/guides/australia-the-hay-plains

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  • dj
    replied
    I’m surprised to see that I’ve been #s 2 and 6-10.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by bad hammy View Post
    America's Quietest Routes

    What’s the least-traveled route in America? Find the quietest routes in your state and get ready to hit the open road.

    https://www.geotab.com/americas-quietest-routes/
    Without consulting my courthouse chronology, I believe I have traversed all or part of every one of those highways. Although, the Dalton Hiway was not yet paved or so-called when I visited Alaska after the Prudhoe Bay discovery.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by bad hammy View Post
    America's Quietest Routes
    What’s the least-traveled route in America? Find the quietest routes in your state and get ready to hit the open road.
    Hmm, FL-29, huh? I've been on it and the reason it's so quiet is that there's nothing on it, including no interesting scenery (scrub brush and then swamp). Pass.

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  • bad hammy
    replied
    America's Quietest Routes

    What’s the least-traveled route in America? Find the quietest routes in your state and get ready to hit the open road.

    https://www.geotab.com/americas-quietest-routes/

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    Not sure if this has already been posted.

    Maps That Show Us A New Perspective

    https://www.exploredplanet.com/guide...w-perspective/

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  • Halfmiler2
    replied
    Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

    Trivia fact - New Jersey is the only US state more densely populated than England.
    And although we have our urban areas, we have plenty of suburbs and even rural areas.

    One suburb tends to run right into another suburb. My county Bergen has the biggest population (about 950K) but manages to fit 70 towns into 247 square miles. The largest town has only about 40K population. Lots of homes on quarter acre lots. My town had 3.5K population and about 2 square miles.
    Last edited by Halfmiler2; 11-09-2020, 02:42 AM.

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  • Halfmiler2
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Indeed, it's super dense in LV, but the rest of the state is mostly deserted.
    And most of the land is owned by the Federal government.

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  • bambam1729
    replied
    Bunch of fun maps here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T54QXY-XUsE

    Plus, this guy's YouTube channel Geography King has all sorts of interesting maps and geographic tidbits

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  • Atticus
    replied
    "How States Voted In Every Presidential Election, From George Washington To Donald Trump"

    with commentary

    https://youtu.be/gCG52EeOv38

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    I've driven through Northern Nevada several times. It makes Southern Wyoming or Central Nebraska feel like Times Square.
    Yes, it is sparsely populated in northern Nevada. On the Idaho/Nevada border in Owyhee County, there is a sign "Next gasoline 237 miles"

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    I've driven through Northern Nevada several times. It makes Southern Wyoming or Central Nebraska feel like Times Square.

    Leave a comment:

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