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  • Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

    When I saw this posted on Facebook under "Marathon runner fined for running in Valley Forge National Historical Park during the government shutdown," I thought it was one of the Kenyans who train there. Then I see that it was a 56 year old of no competitive significance. Pretty bummed what qualifies as a "marathoner" these days.

  • #2
    Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

    Ever run 26.2 miles (or 42,195 meters) NON-STOP before??
    Flat or hilly course.
    Wind-aided or still.
    At 4:42.5 per mile pace...or 14:42.5 per mile pace!!
    No walking, no stopping, just slowing down a tiny bit to grab a cup of water.

    After you've finished one of them, get back to me about what your definition of a marathoner is!!

    Oh, almost forgot.
    Don't forget to remember all the many weeks and months of steady training it takes to get yourself into the physical AND MENTAL state of being able to even contemplate trying one of these monsters!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

      Originally posted by aaronk
      No walking, no stopping, just slowing down a tiny bit to grab a cup of water.
      Not sure what your point is. Lots of people do that during a marathon. Does that mean they're not marathoners?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

        recent discussion on this in Current Events

        viewtopic.php?f=1&t=52130

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

          My father, who has always been faster than the average runner his age and myself, someone who doesn't run because I have neither the will nor the attention span to run for longer than a few minutes at a time fundamentally disagree on this. He thinks that someone who runs a five hour marathon can call himself a marathoner and I think that they should only give out medals to people who finish inside of a certain time or placing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

            Listen to your father.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

              Speaking of the marathon.
              Today, a contestant on Who Wants to be a Millionaire, a 30ish young woman, bailed on the $100,000 question, which went something like this:

              How many marathons would a marathoner have to run to circumnavigate the globe?
              a. 350 b. 550 c. 750 d 950

              She had used all her lifelines to reach $56,000 and had to walk away from a guaranteed $100,000.
              Serves her right.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                How would a marathoner circumnavigate the globe? Wouldn't he/she need a footpath across the oceans. Last time I looked, there were none there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                  Originally posted by tandfman
                  How would a marathoner circumnavigate the globe? Wouldn't he/she need a footpath across the oceans. Last time I looked, there were none there.
                  I knew the moment I sent it someone would snipe at that technicality it but did not think it worth editing. Obviously there is no footpath along the equator.

                  The question was phrased to "equal the distance around the earth" or something like that.

                  The point was, she forfeited $100,000 because she either did not know the distance of a marathon, did not know the circumference of the earth or could not divide approx 26 miles into approx 25,000 miles to arrive at the only obvious correct answer, d.950..

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                  • #10
                    Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                    .......never mind

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                      Two divergent thoughts.

                      I have several friends that are not traditional runner types, some otherwise athletic, others not particularly so. Their efforts to run marathons may have a larger impact on the quality of their lives then my doing so, as I was always lean and it is usually easy to not gain weight [actually hard work to keep from going below 60kg].

                      I was a very mediocre high school runner (just barely made last man on the JV team my senior year on a decent but not really good team). Seven years later I started running regularly in August -- On December 1 I ran a marathon in 2:52 without knowing much at all, including what pace to run at so that I ran the first a last portion a minute/mile faster than miles 4-16. It does not take a really good runner to run 6:30 pace (or my next at slightly sub-6:00) which compared to my high school times of over 11:00 for two miles. And while a number of sports (e.g., in high school) that take 15-25 hours per week, even running 100 miles/week takes only 11-12 hours (for a male). I think I spent less than 200 hours running before my first marathon. So, while a five hour marathon is an achievement it really does not reflect much time spent in pursuit of the goal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                        Originally posted by JumboElliott
                        When I saw this posted on Facebook under "Marathon runner fined for running in Valley Forge National Historical Park during the government shutdown," I thought it was one of the Kenyans who train there. Then I see that it was a 56 year old of no competitive significance. Pretty bummed what qualifies as a "marathoner" these days.
                        Maybe he runs a lot of marathons and the run he was doing in the park was for the specific purpose of marathon training. In that case, marathoner is a an apt description of the man who was fined. It would be even more appropriate if marathon running is a big part of his identity.

                        Someone like Marlow might not be the best track fan in the world, and may even identify himself primarily as something else like teacher, coach, movie buff, etc., but a good headline would still read "Former PV Star Dragila Files for Restraining Order Against T&F Fan" (why would a movie buff stalk a former PV star?).

                        I'm a recreational jogger that also enjoys entering and training for road races. The marathon isn't my favorite distance, but I've finished 4 of them (inlcuding one 4 days ago).

                        As of this moment, I'm comfortable calling myself a marathoner at least until my quads feel normal while going down stairs or while running/jogging (hopefully by early next week). I was certainly a marathoner while running on Sunday (even if i wasn't a good one)! Other than that, I generally don't think of myself as a marathoner unless I'm discussing recreational marathon participation with another runner.

                        Please don't introduce me as a marathoner though. I worked too hard on my modest (but impressive to old guys who remember how low the WR was in the days before modern poles came into use) PV personal best for something like running 26 miles for no particular reason to be my primary athletic identity. Can I claim to be a PVer even though I wasn't even national class and haven't planted a pole in over 7 years?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                          Originally posted by 26mi235
                          And while a number of sports (e.g., in high school) that take 15-25 hours per week, even running 100 miles/week takes only 11-12 hours (for a male). I think I spent less than 200 hours running before my first marathon. So, while a five hour marathon is an achievement it really does not reflect much time spent in pursuit of the goal.
                          This depends on age and gender. A 5 hour marathon qualifies you for Boston if you are a woman over 75. It is only five minutes away from BQ if you are a man over 80. And those people spend far more time on running the same distance. (I remember an episode of an old lady who tried to follow the Lydiard training plan, and ended up running 20+ hours a week.)

                          Beyond that, the amount of training required for a sub-3, sub-4 or whatever marathon varies significantly even among people of the same gender and similar age. If you could run 2:52 on fewer than 200 hours of running, then you were very suited for distance running. (Think what percentage of men in your age could have done the same. And remember that high school cross country runners are a self-selected group.)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                            Originally posted by 26mi235
                            Two divergent thoughts.

                            I have several friends that are not traditional runner types, some otherwise athletic, others not particularly so. Their efforts to run marathons may have a larger impact on the quality of their lives then my doing so, as I was always lean and it is usually easy to not gain weight [actually hard work to keep from going below 60kg].

                            I was a very mediocre high school runner (just barely made last man on the JV team my senior year on a decent but not really good team). Seven years later I started running regularly in August -- On December 1 I ran a marathon in 2:52 without knowing much at all, including what pace to run at so that I ran the first a last portion a minute/mile faster than miles 4-16. It does not take a really good runner to run 6:30 pace (or my next at slightly sub-6:00) which compared to my high school times of over 11:00 for two miles. And while a number of sports (e.g., in high school) that take 15-25 hours per week, even running 100 miles/week takes only 11-12 hours (for a male). I think I spent less than 200 hours running before my first marathon. So, while a five hour marathon is an achievement it really does not reflect much time spent in pursuit of the goal.
                            The devil is in the details. I haven't weighed 60kg since I was 13 years old, and as we both know, distance running is all about VO2 Max, which is a function of body weight. When I was in my best shape, my 5K pace wasn't much faster than 6:30 pace, but I could also bench press over 400 pounds and I regularly hit speeds over 40 m.p.h. on the bike in match sprints races.

                            Former NFL football player Hines Ward will be competing in the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii tomorrow, and he claims that he's in the best shape of his life, having lost almost 40 pounds since he retired from football and begain training for triathlons, but he still weighs 193 pounds (87 kg). His goal is to run the marathon portion of the race at 9:00 pace. My point is that there are plenty of 90 kg guys, such as Crossfit Champion Rich Froning, who are well below 10% body fat, but who couldn't run a marathon at 6:30 pace no matter how much they trained, unless they lost a lot of muscle weight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Loose definitiion of "marathoner"

                              Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                              My point is that there are plenty of 90 kg guys, such as Crossfit Champion Rich Froning, who are well below 10% body fat, but who couldn't run a marathon at 6:30 pace no matter how much they trained, unless they lost a lot of muscle weight.
                              Froning's 5K PB is listed as 20:00. But I would be surprised if he could run a 3:30 marathon (8 minute pace) without losing significant weight. He may even not break 4 hours at his current weight.

                              http://athletes.roguefitness.com/rich-froning/

                              And this is the "fittest man on earth"? I guess their definition of fitness does not include endurance...

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