Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

the splendid splinter

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • houstonian
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Ted Williams and Muhammad Ali set the standard for amazing athletic productivity in spite of years lost in their respective primes.
    Williams also defined the prototype of the "born" hitter: 20/10 vision in his right eye (vision of a pilot) with hand-to-eye coordination good enough to be the self-proclaimed "best fly fisherman" of all time.
    In his refinement of acheivement, Williams was also a pioneer. I think he may have been one of the very first prodigious talents who also obsessively worked at his craft, yielding a glimpse of what was possible when talent fused with training. Could Williams have been the first "freak" to work at his game?

    Leave a comment:


  • user4
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by Marlow
    Yeah, I have a real problem judging people in many historical situations. As I tell my students, if you don't think you are capable of committing atrocities like the Holocaust, then it is sure to happen again. Only the fear of your own moral weakness can save you.

    As Mr. Burke said, "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." . . . and we are really, really good at minding our own business and doing nothing.
    Id settle for not having good men call evil good.

    As for the spledid splinter: Batting 400 while giving your best years to winning two world wars .. not bad, not bad at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Thanks for the heads-up.
    Unintentional humour ?
    I ain't that clever.
    I guess one could say, 'he often lost his head when dealing with the media.' 8-)

    Originally posted by user4
    Originally posted by jeremyp
    Love the sinner AND the sin? Now that I think of it those Slave owners were just doing what was natural. Also Jackie was proud of his racial/ethnic heritage.
    actually it is kind of true, exploiting other people comes natural to all of us.
    Yeah, I have a real problem judging people in many historical situations. As I tell my students, if you don't think you are capable of committing atrocities like the Holocaust, then it is sure to happen again. Only the fear of your own moral weakness can save you.

    As Mr. Burke said, "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." . . . and we are really, really good at minding our own business and doing nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • DecFan
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Charles McGrath's lengthy review in the NY Times helpfully compares this biography with earlier ones:
    "Williams’s 1969 autobiography, “My Turn at Bat,” written by John Underwood in a voice that uncannily reproduces the Kid’s own, is still one of the best instances of the “as told to” genre. In 2004, less than two years after Williams’s death, the Boston sportswriter Leigh Montville . . . published a quick but serviceable biography that seemed to cover all the bases. There is also a scholarly biography by Michael Seidel, a Columbia professor, that focuses on baseball and leaves the psychologizing to others.

    "What distinguishes Bradlee’s “The Kid” from the rest of Williams lit is, first of all, its size (thick enough to chock a car during a tire change, it’s surely one of the longest books ever about a sports figure) and the depth of its reporting. Bradlee seemingly talked to everyone, not just baseball people but Williams’s fishing buddies, old girlfriends, his two surviving wives and both of his daughters (a son, John-Henry, died in 2004), and he had unparalleled access to Williams family archives. His account does not materially alter our picture of Williams the player, but fills it in with much greater detail and nuance. He argues persuasively, for instance, that Williams’s .388 average in 1957, when he turned 39, was in its way an even greater feat than the youthful .406.

    Leave a comment:


  • JumboElliott
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Ted Williams' baseball reference page is like pornography.

    Leave a comment:


  • user4
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by jeremyp
    Love the sinner AND the sin? Now that I think of it those Slave owners were just doing what was natural. Also Jackie was proud of his racial/ethnic heritage.
    actually it is kind of true, exploiting other people comes natural to all of us. Selling your own race, on your own shores, into slavery comes natural. Buying people and transferring them to plantations across the sea comes perfectly natural. Paying the trader for ownership of the slave to work the fields and make a profit, that also comes very natural to people. What is really odd is that people today actually think they are inherently morally superior to their ancestors....but that sense of moral superiority also comes natural. Maybe we are all human and have allot more in common than we think.

    Observing the evidence of human nature over a span of 20 thousand years , we find a few instances where what would be expected and natural did not happen and one of them is the abolition of slavery. It took a rare and exceptional, almost supernatural, philosophy to undermine this ancient natural, and long enduring institution. The 18th and 19th centuries were remarkable for many reasons one being the conviction and courage of common citizens in Britain and the US to take on vast intrenched powerful financial interests to expand human liberty is one amazing contribution of that era.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruce Kritzler
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by Marlow
    [Thanks for the heads-up.
    Unintentional humour ?

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by jeremyp
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by jeremyp
    was met at the train station by a gaggle of 100 or so of the extended Mexican clan. Ted took one look at them from afar and beat a hasty retreat. He didn't want to be seen with them."
    Gee, mid-century and someone doesn't want to be a part of minority that is looked down at and discriminated against? Wonder where that conditioned behavior comes from? It's easy to judge him today, but at the time, that was par for the course. Jackie Robinson is our hero in accepting who he was, but he couldn't exactly hide from it, could he? Williams had other demons to contend with - he's gets a pass on the heritage issue from me.
    Love the sinner AND the sin? Now that I think of it those Slave owners were just doing what was natural. Also Jackie was proud of his racial/ethnic heritage.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by jeremyp
    was met at the train station by a gaggle of 100 or so of the extended Mexican clan. Ted took one look at them from afar and beat a hasty retreat. He didn't want to be seen with them."
    Gee, mid-century and someone doesn't want to be a part of minority that is looked down at and discriminated against? Wonder where that conditioned behavior comes from? It's easy to judge him today, but at the time, that was par for the course. Jackie Robinson is our hero in accepting who he was, but he couldn't exactly hide from it, could he? Williams had other demons to contend with - he's gets a pass on the heritage issue from me.
    Love the sinner AND the sin?

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by jeremyp
    was met at the train station by a gaggle of 100 or so of the extended Mexican clan. Ted took one look at them from afar and beat a hasty retreat. He didn't want to be seen with them."
    Gee, mid-century and someone doesn't want to be a part of minority that is looked down at and discriminated against? Wonder where that conditioned behavior comes from? It's easy to judge him today, but at the time, that was par for the course. Jackie Robinson is our hero in accepting who he was, but he couldn't exactly hide from it, could he? Williams had other demons to contend with - he's gets a pass on the heritage issue from me.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    not to put too fine a point on it, but there is a difference between ethnicity and race.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by jeremyp
    Originally posted by gh
    but he was very progressive on race…. some more good material here in an IV w/ Bradlee

    http://www.salon.com/2013/12/15/ted_wil ... o_on_race/
    Someone who goes to great lengths to hide his mexican heritage is hardly progressive about race. He may have been pro "Negroes" playing, but he was ashamed of being hispanic. My guess is he was for Blacks playing because he loved competition, and he wanted the best players to compete with. From a Bradlee interview: "He always spoke rather contemptuously of his extended family on his mother's side and referred to them as "the Mexicans" in not a nice way.There was a very telling moment in 1939 after Williams had completed his rookie year with the Red Sox and had made an absolutely smashing debut — hit well over 300 and led the league in runs batted in — and he returned to San Diego the conquering hero and was met at the train station by a gaggle of 100 or so of the extended Mexican clan. Ted took one look at them from afar and beat a hasty retreat. He didn't want to be seen with them."

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    but he was very progressive on race…. some more good material here in an IV w/ Bradlee

    http://www.salon.com/2013/12/15/ted_wil ... o_on_race/

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    One detail I learned about was that he had a mexican mother and was ashamed to be hispanic, keeping it a secret.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: the splendid splinter

    Originally posted by gh
    if you're a Ted Williams fan (he's maybe my all-time fave), this could be a must-have book. But even if you're just a general fan of baseball, reading this review has some nifty insights.
    http://www.sfgate.com/default/article/T ... 063362.php
    Thanks for the heads-up. I may have to get it. Willie Mays is my guy, but TW certainly fascinated me also. Seemingly simplistic, but accurate:

    to sum things up: a deeply flawed man with really great eye-hand coordination.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X